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Timeline of The Space Race - Wiki Article
The Space Race was an informal competition between the United States and the Soviet Union that lasted roughly from 1957 to 1975. (01:20)
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UMMC Physician Profile: Seema Patil, M.D.
This two-minute video introduces viewers to Dr. Seema Patil, an assistant professor in the division of gastroenterology and hepatology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Dr. Patil's special interests include general gastroenterology, inflammatory bowel disease and women's health. Watch this video to learn more about her practice at UMMC. Related Links: UM Digestive Disease Center http://www.umm.edu/digestive/index.htm Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology http://www.umm.
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2.2 Scotland

Having enjoyed political independence until 1707, the survival of many of Scotland's institutions – notably its systems of law, religion and education – after Union with England contributed to the preservation of its singular identity. The different way in which Scotland began to be incorporated into the UK, through monarchical ascent (of James I of Scotland to the English throne) rather than by conquest (as was the case in Wales and Ireland), may account for the lesser impact the develo
Author(s): The Open University

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Social work learning practice
This free audio course, Social work learning practice, focuses on the importance of people's backgrounds and experiences in the field of social work. It identifies the diverse ways in which service users and social workers define themselves, helping you to understand how the two groups perceive each other and relate successfully to each other. An understanding of how people make sense of their experiences will help you to define yourself, and your own place within the process.Author(s): Creator not set

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

References

Allen, J. (2006) ‘Claiming connections: a distant world of sweatshops?’ in Barnett, C., Robinson, J. and Rose, G. (eds) A Demanding World, Milton Keynes, The Open University.
Barnes, D.K.A. (2002) ‘Invasions by marine life on plastic debris’, Nature, vol. 416, 25 April, pp. 808–9.
Barnett, C. (2006) ‘Reaching out: the demands of citizenship in a gl
Author(s): The Open University

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2.10 The distribution of repeated measurements

As noted in the previous section, if the same quantity is measured repeatedly, the results will generally be scattered across a range of values. This is perhaps best illustrated using a real example. Table 2 shows 10 measurements of a quantity called the 'unit cell constant' for an industrial catalyst used in the refining of petrol; this is an important quantity which determines how well the catalyst works, and can be measured by X-ray diffraction techniques. Notice that the cell constant is
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able:

  • describe social citizenship in relation to rights and obligations within society.


Author(s): The Open University

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"The Mind of the Market"
wasserstrom book coverAuthor and psychologist Michael Shermer explains how evolution shaped the modern economy-and why people are so irrational about money. How did we make the leap from ancient hunter-gatherers to modern consumers and traders? Why do people get so emotional and irrational about bottom-line financial and business decisions? Is the capitalist marketplace a sort of Darwinian orga
Author(s): The Center for International Studies at the Univer

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North Dakota Facts
4th grade students explore the State of North Dakota and even sing the state song!
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1.9.1 ‘I dunno’

In his analysis of Extract 5, Potter focuses on the phrase ‘I dunno’, which appears at the beginning and at the end of Diana's last turn above. This phrase seems throwaway, just one fragment, yet perhaps it illustrates something about people's methods or discursive practices more widely. Why is that phrase there? What work does it do? Given the point made in the previous section that events can always be described differently, why this description of this kind of mental state at this poin
Author(s): The Open University

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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand how chemical processes in the rest of the world affect the Arctic environment and the species inhabiting it

  • recognise the physical processes that determine atmosphere and oceanic flows in the Arctic

  • understand the scientific research process and the use of scientific evidence

  • use quantitative scientific evidence to examine the link between atmospheric carbon dioxide levels
    Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction to Sociology - Kelly Damphousse 2e
Joshua Davis
Introduction to Sociology was written by teams of sociology professors and writers and peer-reviewed by college instructors nationwide. The textbook was developed for OpenStax College as part of […]

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2012 Barksdale Awards
The Barksdale Awards were established to encourage students to test themselves in environments that don't have the built-in safeties of a classroom, teaching lab or library. Vide by Nathan Latil
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Warwick and Boston Partnership
Warwick's Professor Wyn Grant and Boston University's Professor Graham Wilson discuss Politics and the Financial Crisis along with the research collaboration and partnership between the two institutions.
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Choisir un navigateur pour consulter un site web (Module 6.3) (Vidéo)

MOOC "Données et services numériques dans le nuage et ailleurs" : cours en ligne délivré du 27 janvier 2014 au 31 mars 2014 sur la plateforme FUN-MOOC.

Semaine 6 : Ouverture ou cloisonnement, enjeux de l’interopérabilité
Cours 3 : Choisir un navigateur pour consulter un site web


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Tutorial 1: Google Charts Tutorial
Tutorial 1: Google Charts Tutorial - UNSPECIFIED Keywords:Tutorial
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Introduction

Any local newspaper describes the latest achievements of volunteers in the community: hospital fund-raising, a wildlife pond created. The advantages to the community are obvious, but this unit explores how engaging in voluntary work can enhance your employment opportunities.

It will focus mainly on how voluntary work can improve job prospects, for those actively job seeking or considering a career change. Employers are impressed by volunteering, but many volunteers don’t appreciate wh
Author(s): The Open University

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2.5 Looking ahead: understanding economic change

Section 2 has looked at different ways of understanding the new economy, of understanding what is actually happening.

Question 1

Look back over the different understandings of the new economy. Is there really a new economy – jus
Author(s): The Open University

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2.5.2 Punctuation

Some of the sentences we have looked at are harder to understand than they might be because they are not very well punctuated. Punctuation marks are the ‘stops’ in a sentence that divide it up into parts. They make it easier to follow the meaning of the words. For instance, it is easier to read this sentence of Philip's if we put a comma after ‘wealthy’:

With society becoming more wealthy, it was possible for t
Author(s): The Open University

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The World in 2016: Predictions, predictions
We discuss the global economy, whether Islamic State has peaked and the future of forecasting itself
Author(s): The Economist

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