References

James, W. (1950) The Principles of Psychology, New York, Dover (first published 1890).
Johnston, M. (1987) ‘Human beings’, in Journal of Philosophy, 84, 2, 59–83.
Robinson, J. (1995) ‘Startle’, in Journal of Philosophy, 92, 53–74.
Rorty, A. (1980) ‘Introduction’ in A. Rorty (ed.) Explaining Emoti
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Starting with psychology
The most 'important and greatest puzzle' we face as humans is ourselves (Boring, 1950, p. 56). Humans are a puzzle, one that is complex, subtle and multi-layered, and it gets even more complicated as we evolve over time and change within different contexts. When answering the question 'what makes us who we are?' psychologists put forward a range of explanations about why people feel, think and behave the way they do. Just when psychologists seem to understand one bit of 'who we are' up pops so
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions). this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

Grateful thanks is made to the pupils and staff of: The Henley College, Oxon; Langtree School, Wo
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1.5.2 Ways of organising yourself

How do you organise yourself?

Activity

Make a note of how you organise your:

  • emails

  • internet bookmarks or favorites

  • computer files

  • your h
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1.8.1 The experience of Hillsborough

We have explored the challenges of entering into situations which are ambiguous and open to competing interpretations. But what happens in a situation where nobody knows what is going on, where established meanings have collapsed altogether? Tom Heller gives a graphic account of such a situation in his description of his experience of the Hillsborough football stadium disaster.

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DUS : Verkeersveiligheid
DUS.png

Drive Up Safety (DUS) biedt verkeersveilige en ervaringsgerichte workshops en activiteiten aan rond verschillende verkeersveilige thema’s zoals:

  • zichtbaarheid,
  • gordeldracht,
  • afleiding,
  • alcohol en drugs. 

Met de …


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1.5 Young carers

Who is left out of the definition of informal carer? At first sight, taking account of the four complications noted above means that no one is left out. The definition can embrace anyone who is taking unpaid responsibility for the welfare of another person. Where do children and young people come into this? Maybe in answering Activity 5 you considered whether parenting young children makes you a carer. Looking after young children is not usually seen as making someone a carer. It is seen as m
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Lesson 05 - One Minute Romanian
In lesson 5 of One Minute Romanian you will learn to say that you're learning Romanian. Remember - even a few phrases of a language can help you make friends and enjoy travel more. Find out more about One Minute Romanian at our website - http://www.oneminutelanguages.com. One Minute Romanian is brought to you by the Radio Lingua Network and is ©Copyright 2008.Author(s): No creator set

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LQP Asks: What is the best advice you have ever received?
LQP Asks: What is the best advice you have ever received?
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1.11 Addition and subtraction in practice - fluid balance

A common healthcare example that uses addition and subtraction involves calculating the fluid balance of a patient.

Fluid balance is a simple but very useful way to estimate whether a patient is either becoming dehydrated or overfilled with liquids. It is calculated, on a daily basis, by adding up the total volume of liquid that has gone into their body (drinks, oral liquid medicines, intravenous drips, transfusions), then adding up the total volume of liquid that has come out of their
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Preamble

It is important to distinguish between the different dimensions of European identity, and we shall begin by identifying some of the different ways in which ‘Europe’ has been understood. Basic distinctions can be drawn between a number of quite different conceptions. These involve ideas of Europe as a geographical entity, Europe as a sequence of ideas, and – following the near destruction of Europe as a project – something that had to be created anew if it was to exist at all. In this
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5 Play structure

Just like a novel or a poem, a play will have some sort of structure. The traditional plot of a play will consist of an exposition, action leading to a climax, and a denouement or resolution. A certain amount of information about characters and events is necessary at the start of a play, and sometimes an explanation of what has happened in the past is required for the audience to make sense of what is to follow: all this is accomplished through the exposition. Some skill
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2.1 How do we use maps?

Reading about maps, I have been struck by the number of times that the idea of ‘maps as part of our everyday experience’ has been mentioned. In fact, I was thinking about it recently, when I was preparing to travel from Belfast to London. I left home with a mental map of my journey to the airport – but on the way I found that the road was blocked by a burst water main. ‘Plan B’ was to consult my local road map for the quickest alternative and, in doing so, I wondered i
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English: Brian Reed - Less is More: Contemporary Poems Composed Through Deletion
Open lecture by Professor Brian Reed, Department of English, University of Washington. Since the turn of the millennium, a number of poets have begun composing verse by taking pre-existing texts and selectively deleting words, phrases, sentences, and even whole sections. Does it make sense to call such poets "writers" in anything but a very loose sense, since, instead of generating text, they remove it? Moreover, since they give us nothing but passages of borrowed language with the original wor
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions). This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in thi
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Episode 14 – Exposure to the Elements

Have you seen Wolfram|Alpha? It’s not an internet search engine, even though it seems like one, but rather a computational knowledge engine. You ask it a question, and it actually computes the answer. Seems the perfect way to double-check if the meaning of life is really 42, like Douglas Adams wrote in A Hitchhikers’ Guide to the Galaxy.

However, it occurred to me that the answer should actually be 94 not 42. Here i
Author(s): accessallareas@museum.vic.gov.au (Museum Victoria)

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Air Pollution
How we can be sure our air is safe to breathe? This album introduces the principles and concepts of air quality management and looks at how we analyse pollution control problems. Five video tracks review the nature and characteristics of air pollution today and demonstrate how air quality data is interpreted. They include a comparison between shipping and car emission levels, the processes used to remove pollutants from the air, and ways in which British Aerospace could limit its Volatile Organ
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5.2 Precambrian and Lower Palaeozoic Basement

The Precambrian and Lower Palaeozoic Basement of the British Isles is a series of nine discrete, exotic terranes whose boundaries are fault systems that have undergone large but usually unknown amounts of lateral and vertical movement over time (Figure 11 and Author(s): The Open University

1.3.4 Diagrams for connectivity

Relationship diagrams offer one way of putting more order into your understanding of a situation. Each element of a situation is named in an oval and lines between ovals indicate that there are relationships between the particular elements – but no more than this!

Systems maps are another way of developing one's understanding of a situation. Systems maps are essentially ‘structure’ diagrams. Each element or sub-system is contained in a circle or oval and a line is d
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3.2 Analogue things

In I claimed that we lived in an analogue world, but put off defining what the term ‘analogue’ means. Here is a starting point: analogue quantities are ones that change continuously.

It is easy to misread this definition. What it does not mean is that analogue quantities are ones that change continually, or all the time. So what does it mean? We need an example.

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