12.1.1 Survey questionnaires

Questionnaires are lists of questions that enable information to be gathered efficiently from a relatively large number of respondents. Most questionnaires require a fixed type of response, such as a choice between available answers, or along a scale of response. For example, a product design questionnaire might suggest, ‘I found the product easy to use’ and provide a five-point scale of response from ‘agree strongly’ to ‘disagree strongly’. Or a question might be, ‘how often do
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Introduction

Social scientists collect evidence to support their claims and theories in different ways. Such evidence is crucial to the practice of social science and to the production of social scientific knowledge.

You may be aware of the idea of active reading, which is about reading with the aim of understanding and grasping something: a definition, an argument, a piece of evidence. What that suggests is that active reading is about reading and thinking at the same time. In
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1.7 Localization of signalling proteins

Since signalling proteins cannot diffuse as rapidly as small second messengers, they need be close to their downstream target in order to be able to function. Where they are located with respect to both their subcellular position and their immediate neighbours is therefore vitally important. The plasma membrane is usually the initial location, and proteins can be attached to the plasma membrane in various ways (Author(s): The Open University

6.3 Seaside photography

Image 88 Photographer/Painter: Anon. Subject: New Brighton beach featuring the canvas tent studio of James Ravenscroft, 1880s.

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Bytesize Science: The Chemistry of Acne
Here is some good news for you: you can blame the sounds and odors that come from your body on bacteria. Yup -- those little critters are the ones responsible for a lot of what goes on inside our bodies. People can be uptight about all these bodily sights and smells, but understanding the science behind what may appear gross may make these things a little less gross. Some key vocabulary words include sebum, bacteria, pore, whitehead, blackhead, benzoyl peroxide, and benzoyl radicals. (03:58
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Literary Festival 2016: Progress in Troubled Times: learning from "The Age of Genius" [Audio]
Speaker(s): Professor AC Grayling | What happened to the European mind between 1605, when an audience watching Macbeth at the Globe might believe that regicide was such an aberration of the natural order that ghosts could burst from the ground, and 1649, when a large crowd, perhaps including some who had seen Macbeth forty-four years earlier, could stand and watch the execution of a king? Or consider the difference between a magus casting a star chart and the day in 1639, when Jonathan Horrock a
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3.3.1 Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase)

Members of this family of lipid kinases usually have two subunits: one is a catalytic subunit with a lipid kinase domain and the other is a regulatory subunit, which contains two SH2 domains and a SH3 domain (p 85 PI 3-kinase in Figure 13).

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6.2.1 Studio conventions in street photography

Activity 23

Look at Images 81 and 82. Given your knowledge of conventional studio portraiture, can you see any similarities between studio and street practice?

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16.2.2 Storing and retrieving data

As each item is scanned, the checkout computer looks up its price. The running total for each customer's purchases is stored temporarily in the checkout terminal. Other data may also be stored, such as the amount of money that has been taken at that checkout during the day.


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17.2 Getting finance and organisational backing

Like talk, ideas are cheap. Even generating a prototype of an invention can be cheap compared with the resources needed to produce and market an innovation. The independent inventor or designer is likely to have to rely on family and friends for financial backing, particularly in the early stages. Seed capital is sometimes available in the form of innovation grants from government bodies, such as the Department for Trade and Industry in the UK, which offers development funding to individuals
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Analysing European Romanticism
The principal tenets of the movement known as Romanticism first began in Germany and England, with the former pioneering the moral and philosophical beliefs and the latter producing the first Romantic artists and poets. This album concentrates on the development and spread of Romanticism in mainland Europe, analysing in clear, concise terms the metaphysical questions and beliefs that engendered the movement, along with the cultural and historical contexts that encouraged its development. The alb
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

USA vs USSR: The Cold War: Crash Course World History, #39
In which John Green teaches you about the Cold War, which was occasionally hot, but on average, it was cool. In the sense of its temperature. It was by no means cool, man. After World War II, there were basically two big geopolitical powers left to divide up the world. And divide they did. The United States and the Soviet Union divvied up Europe in the aftermath of the war, and then proceeded to spend the next 45 years fighting over the rest of the world. It was the great ideological struggle, w
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Flooding, oceanic fungi, identifying old bones
This week in the Planet Earth Podcast: a look at ways to reduce the risk of urban flooding; identifying species and building biographies from tiny fragments of ancient bone; new species of fungi from the ocean.
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#390: The human cost of hate: The lasting damage caused by homophobia and transphobia

Psychiatric epidemiologist Professor Michael King discusses the devastating psychological harm suffered by victims of homophobia and transphobia. He also examines the role of families, governments and religion in curbing the problem. Presented by Lynne Haultain.

 


Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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#393: Antagonize your ageing: The science behind living healthier for longer

Geriatrician Professor Andrea Maier describes what happens to our cells as we age, and explains the causes of age-related diseases. She also discusses how positive lifestyle choices and preventive medical interventions can help us live healthier for longer. Presented by Dr Andi Horvath.


Author(s): up-close@unimelb.edu.au (University of Melbourne)

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17.1 Introduction

I'm going to pause here to try to put together some of the ideas we have encountered so far. I deliberately chose the example of a supermarket to illustrate some of the key processes involved in an ICT system. Figure 15 is a modified version of the block diagram for computers in a ne
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4.6 The Classification Theorem

In this subsection we state the Classification Theorem for surfaces, which classifies a surface in terms of its boundary number β, its orientability number ω and its Euler characteristic χ, each of which is a topological invariant – it is preserved under homeomorphisms.

Let us remind ourselves of these three numbers.

  • A surface may or may not have a boundary, and, if it does, then the boundary has finitely many disjoint pieces. The nu
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Introduction

Computers are designed to receive, store, manipulate and present data. This course explains how computers do this, with reference to the examples of a PC, kitchen scales and a digital camera. In particular it explores the idea that the data in a computer represents something in the real world.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 2 study in Author(s): The Open University

RVC 28 - Dietary Fatty Acids and Fertility of Humans and Animals
We’re constantly told that too much fat in our diet is bad for the health of ourselves and our animals. However it now seems that very particular types of fats are implicated in determining not only animal health but their reproductive performance. Here Dr Robert Abayasekara and Prof Claire Wathes of the Department Of Veterinary Basic Sciences at the RVC explain their work demonstrating the effect of different polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on human and animal fertility.
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