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Datblygu strategaethau astudio effeithiol (Develop effective study strategies)
Gall dod i wybod sut rydych yn dysgu eich helpu i ddatblygu technegau astudio sy'n gweddu i'ch anghenion a'r dasg dan sylw. Bydd gwella eich strategaethau astudio yn arbed amser i chi, yn ysgafnhau eich baich gwaith ac yn helpu i wella ansawdd eich gwaith. Yn yr uned hon byddwch yn dysgu technegau ac yn datblygu sgiliau a fydd yn eich helpu gyda'ch astudiaethau. Author(s): Creator not set

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

2.2 Actividad

Actividad 2.2a

In this activity you are going to listen to two people being interviewed about monuments and sights in their country. You will also learn how to say where things are.

1 Listen and choose the correct op
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Introducción

In this session you are going to learn how to ask about different places of interest in Spain, Chile and Uruguay: what they are, where they are and what they look like.

Key learning points

  • Asking and answering where a monument or a building is

  • Describing a building

  • Using estar to indicate location


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3.1 Listening to and taking notes from a telephone call

In this section you practise obtaining information on the phone. You describe a relocation site as part of the more detailed research into the advantages of possible locations.

In the next activity you listen to a telephone call between Steve Vance who works for the Reloc agency and an employee of the Commission for New Towns (CNT), an agency whose task is to promote the development of a number of new towns and provide information for companies that wish to relocate.

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2.1 Making a shortlist of locations

Once a company has decided to relocate it needs to research possible locations.

This section considers locations in terms of size, facilities, communications, population and amenities. You will collect information and work on descriptions, summaries and question forms.

The first step in the relocation process is to make a shortlist of locations that match the organisation's needs. This means considering the advantages and disadvantages of each site. Masito Electronics is consideri
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand spoken descriptions of holiday resorts

  • understand people talking about where and when they take their holidays and why

  • write an informal postcard or letter identifying the advantages and disadvantages of a holiday resort and/or describing personal holiday plans

  • make a short oral presentation about personal holiday plans

  • question other people about their plans
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Emotions and emotional disorders
In this free course, Emotions and emotional disorders, you will learn about some of the disorders related to the feelings of stress, sadness and anxiety including how these disorders are diagnosed, their biological correlates, and evidence of their possible causes. First published on Wed, 23 May 2018 as Author(s): Creator not set

4.11 Critiquing gender essentialism

Activity 19

0 hours 30 minutes

Look again at what Tannen and Gray say about men's and women's communicative behaviour. Then review the description of essentialism
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3.15 Exploring anti-oppressive practice

Click to read: Anti-Oppressive Practice

Activity 12

0 hours 4
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2.3.1 An essentialist perspective

One way of understanding apparent differences in people’s behaviour and needs is to account for them as a direct result of their membership of a particular social group or category. For example, it might be suggested that a patient expresses herself in a very physical way because she is of African-Caribbean origin, and therefore because of certain innate biological or psychological attributes shared by all members of that ethnic group. Or it might be argued that a male manager behaves aggre
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2.1 A communication ‘problem’?

This course starts by exploring at a general level the relationship between ideas of ‘difference’ and issues of interpersonal communication. In the first activity, you will consider a brief case study that offers a way into discussing these issues, which can at times seem quite complex and entangled. The case study is taken from research into the health and social care needs of black communities in the Brighton, Hove and Lewes area in the south of England (Yazdani and Anju, 1994, quoted i
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1.9 Conclusion

In this course you have seen the importance of the shared meanings that we construct together – how they enable us to act collectively within social situations. In particular, you have explored Goffman’s ideas about how those meanings are constructed through:

  • the way we present ourselves within social situations

  • the way we respond to other people’s presentation of themselves and help to shore up their performances.


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3.3.1 Care: a cautious definition

For study purposes, we do need a definition of care, just as we needed a definition of informal carer. So we propose that in the context of health and social care we define care as:

something that is needed when people cannot function in daily life without the practical help of others.

But, as I have shown, care is a loaded word. It is both a word used by ordinary people to mean love, tende
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2.4.3 abelling

The term ‘informal carer’ is a label. It was coined to describe people who take on unpaid responsibility for the welfare of another person. It is a term which has meaning only when the public world of care provision comes into contact with the private world of the family where caring is a day-to-day, unremarked-upon activity, like reminding a young child to clean her teeth. Labelling yourself as an informal carer requires a major shift in the way you see yourself, a shift neither Arthur n
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6 Audio clip 5: Alex Zinga

Figure 4: Alex Zinga

At the time of the intervi
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5.6 A few final thoughts

You will have seen from this section that it is difficult to talk about the heart without also talking about blood and veins and arteries. It is hard to isolate one body system or one body part and describe it by itself, without talking about other parts of the body as well. One of the important points that we would like you to remember about the biology of the human body is that everything is interlinked. An athlete hoping to maximise their performance in a sport has to work on all pa
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3.4 Type

To improve aerobic fitness the ACSM recommends exercise that employs large muscle groups, is rhythmic or dynamic, can be maintained continuously and is aerobic in nature (Garber et al., 2011). This type of exercise results in larger increases in aerobic fitness. Activities that would fit into this category include walking, running, swimming and cycling. This again depends upon the level of the individual and their goals and demands of their activity or sport.

Frequency, intensity, time
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3 Frequency, intensity, time and type (FITT)

In the previous section the principles of training were considered. When designing an exercise session or programme there are four factors that can be manipulated to adjust the training load – frequency (how often), intensity (how hard), time (how long) and type (what mode), which are commonly referred to by the acronym ‘FITT’.


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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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