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References

Hughes, M. (1991) Closing the Learning Gap, Network Educational Press Ltd.
Lucas, W. (2001) Power Up Your Mind, Nicholas Brearley Publishing.
Rose, C. (1985) Accelerated Learning, Accelerated Learning Systems Ltd.
UNESCO (1977) Suggestive, accelerative learning and teaching: A manual of classroom procedures base
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1.2 Challenges to child-centredness: the curriculum and assessment 5–14 programme

In Scotland, the Scottish Curriculum and Assessment 5–14 Programme is an essential part of the initiative that has been promoted by HM Inspectorate as upholding and maintaining the standard of pupils' achievements in Scottish schools. A Scottish Education Department (SED) consultative paper enjoined the inspectorate to ‘pay particular attention in their inspection of schools to the extent to which schools and education authorities have had regard to the national curricular policies’ (SE
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1.1 Introduction

In this unit you will find a discussion of the national curricula framework in Scotland. This is discussed in terms of the literacy curricula, and compared to the framework set up in England and Wales.

This comparison reveals differing emphases on a number of themes. For example, individual child-centred approaches are evident in the Scottish Curriculum Guideline developments. However, a uniform approach to all children is privileged in the whole-class approaches in the English Nationa
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Introduction

In this unit you will find a discussion of the national curriculam framework in Scotland. This is discussed in terms of the literacy curricula, and compared to the framework set up in England and Wales.

This comparison reveals differing emphases on a number of themes. For example, individual child-centred approaches are evident in the Scottish Curriculum Guideline developments. However, a uniform approach to all children is privileged in the whole-class approaches in the English Nation
Author(s): The Open University

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4.3 Formats

OpenLearn units can be downloaded or taken away in several formats:

  • Print Format

  • Unit Content XML

  • Unit Content RSS

  • OU XML Package

  • IMS Content Package

  • IMS Common Cartridge

  • Plain Zip

  • Moodle Backup

At the asset level the major formats you will find are:

  • text in XML or PDF

  • animation
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2 Online learning – What does the research tell us?

Marion Coomey and John Stephenson review a range of research to try to set out what designers of online learning should learn from experience.

Activity 2

1 hour 0 minutes

Read the article by
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1.2 Copyright and OER

I assume that you are reading this unit because you would like to create a unit similar to the materials that you can find on the OpenLearn website. You therefore have a teaching purpose and are particularly interested in the use of online tuition. Hopefully you are also keen to share your teaching materials with others in OpenLearn Works. But why bother creating a new Open Educational Resource? Surely there is so much material already available for free on the web anyway!

I would answe
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Acknowledgements

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Author details

Sue Platt has been a school governor for 21 years, at both primary and sec
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4 Evaluating success

Understanding the reasons for a school's success may require special expertise, but the fact of that success should be clear…..

Martin & Holt, 2002.

Take another look at the cycle for improvement (below).


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5 Conclusion

I hope this unit has made clearer what a business manager can do to impact positively on the school and its core function of teaching and learning as we move forward into a changing future.

You may now find it helpful to revisit your job description and the notes you made in Activity 1.

Equally, through some of the new developments that are taking place in society, the school itself will need business management in order to best position itself to help pupils, parents and communit
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3 Book awards

Members of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals will be familiar with the Carnegie medal, which is awarded for an outstanding children's book each year.

The BookTrusted website lists 35 different awards for children's books and, although the majority are judged by publishers and critics, some involve children in the selection process.

You might like to investigate how you can get your own pupils involved in selecting books for awards.

Although the
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2 Book reviews

The comments below all relate to the same book, Ruby Holler by Sharon Creech, and have been made by pupils at Churchill Community School, North Somerset – the ‘Churchill Chatterboxes’.

A captivating yet far-fetched book, I feel this would suit most younger readers but older readers would want something more demanding. (Margaret)

I think Ruby Holler is a very moving book, especially when Da
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1 What makes a good book?

I met a dragon face to face

I met a dragon face to face

The year when I was ten,

I took a trip to outer space,

I braved a pirate's den,

I wrestled with a wicked troll,

And fought a great white shark,

I trailed a rabbit down a hole,

I hunted for a snark.

I stowed aboard a submarine,

I opened magic doors,

I travelled in a time machine,
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Introduction

As adults we sometimes struggle to justify our feelings about particular books, but children are quite clear about what they like and don't like.

It is possible to get children to discuss why they liked or did not like particular books and to encourage them to think more deeply about the books they read.

This unit offers ideas and activities to engage pupils in discussing books. It is aimed at librarians, teaching assistants and other adults working with pupils in school librarie
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

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References

Bruner, J. (1996 ) The Culture of Education, Cambridge, Harvard University Press.
Caswell, B. and Lamon, M. (1999) ‘The Development of Scientific Literacy: the Evolution of Ideas in A Knowledge Building Classroom’ in Leach, J. & Moon, R.E. (1999) Learners & Pedagogy, London, Paul Chapman.
Cummins, J. and Sayers, D. (1995) Brave New Schools, Toronto,
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6 One hundred possibilities

The more teachers are convinced that intellectual and expressive activities have both multiplying and unifying possibilities, the more creativity favours friendly exchanges with imagination and fantasy.

Creativity requires that the school of knowing finds connections with the school of expressing, opening the doors to the hundred languages of children.

(Loris Malaguzzi, 1990)

In each of t
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5.2 Case study 3: Menon poetry

The class teacher (Menon, 1999) was keen to develop the sense of a ‘writing community’ early on in the term. In the first few weeks she invited her students to form groups of their own choice, research a poet from a selected list, then plan and carry out a presentation. Students were encouraged to use the internet as part of this research.

At such an early stage in the academic year, when getting to know a
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5.1 Introduction

Creativity should not be considered a separate mental faculty but a characteristic of our way of thinking, knowing and making choices. Creativity seems to emerge from multiple experiences, coupled with a well-supported development of personal resources, including a sense of freedom to venture beyond the unknown. The most favourable situation for creativity seems to be interpersonal exchange, with negotiation conflicts and co
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4.2 Case Study 2: A digital arts collaboration

The Virtual Identities Digital Arts Project (Learning Schools Programme, 1999a) involved post-16 art and design students from two Liverpool schools and two Kent schools in the United Kingdom. The project unlocked new ideas and ways of working by encouraging collaboration between students from different geographical areas, cultures, experiences and perceptions. Each student was assigned a partner. To begin with they exchanged a ‘digital postcard’ that represented one aspect of their
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