How are Earth's spheres interacting?
This Earth science investigation leads students through a brief introduction of the spheres of the Earth and an exploration of the interactions among the spheres. The seven-step investigation incorporates a mixture of informational text, questions, and images. After reading about and interacting with an image of the four main spheres (the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere), students are introduced to the concept of sphere interactions as part of the larger Earth system. Text, que
Author(s): TERC. Center for Earth and Space Science Education

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Ebola infection reported
This article describes cases and outbreaks of Ebola virus. The focus is on how little is known about Ebola and Marberg viruses, especially about how certain people survive those infections. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse
Author(s): Sean Henahan

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All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright 1994-2005 by Access Excellence the National Health Museum.

Ecological Footprint: Overshoot
In this two-minute sound segment, the director of the Sustainability Program for the public policy group Redefining Progress discusses the concept of your ecological footprint. This is the amount of nature it takes to support your lifestyle. He says that if we use more than can be replaced by nature we are in a condition called overshoot. He suggests that this can continue for a while but eventually someone will have to pay with a lower standard of living. This site is from an archive of a daily
Author(s): Creator not set

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Copyright 2002 Jim Metzner Productions, Inc. All rights reserved.

Seed Dispersal 101
This two-minute radio program introduces listeners to the variety of agents that disperse seeds. The program's guest, a plant biologist, cites examples of nonliving and living dispersal agents that include the wind, water, and such animals as birds and bats. He also explains that a plant's fruits or seeds often offer clues about how they are dispersed. The program, which is available here in audio and text, is the first in a series about seed dispersal. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearin
Author(s): Pulse of the Planet

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Copyright 2004 Jim Metzner Productions, Inc. All rights reserved.

Etymologies of Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry
What are the origins and roots of the words geometry, algebra, and trigonometry?
Author(s): Math Forum,Nikki

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Art of the Tetrahedron
Any four points in space that are not all on the same plane mark the corners of four triangles. The triangles in turn are the faces of a tetrahedron. It's the simplest of all polyhedra--solids bounded by polygons... To sculptor Arthur Silverman of New Orleans, however, tetrahedra are very special. He has been investigating variations of tetrahedral forms for more than 20 years in sculptures displayed in public spaces in New Orleans and other cities from Florida to California.
Author(s): Math Forum,Ivars Peterson (MathTrek)

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Examine evidence of Earth turning about an axis
Using an animation of the classic pendulum experiment, this resource supplies middle and high school students with evidence of the Earth's rotation on its axis. The introduction explains that although pendulums are known to swing in a fixed path, on Earth their path appears to shift over time. As the animation reveals, it is not the pendulum's swing that changes--it is the Earth beneath the pendulum that moves. The animation contains three screens: two with different views of a pendulum swinging
Author(s): TERC. Center for Earth and Space Science Education

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Winning secrets to teaching excellence
Using quirky metaphors, inspiring student questions and working day and night — these are some of the winning strategies that have led three Simon Fraser University professors to clinch an SFU 2010 Excellence in Teaching award. See also: http://at.sfu.ca/cwcBOy
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Get Your Motor Running
Students investigate motors and electromagnets as they construct their own simple electric motors using batteries, magnets, paper clips and wire.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

All Caught Up: Bycatching and Design
Bycatch, the unintended capture of animals in commercial fishing gear, is one of the hottest topics in marine conservation today. About 25% of the entire global catch is bycatch. This surprisingly high level of bycatch is responsible for the decline of hundreds of thousands of dolphins, whales, porpoises, seabirds and sea turtles each year. Through this curricular unit, students will analyze the significance of bycatch in the global ecosystem and propose solutions to help reduce bycatch. Student
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Do Plants Eat?
Through a teacher-led discussion, students realize that the food energy plants obtain comes from sunlight via the plant process of photosynthesis. They learn what photosynthesis is, at an age-appropriate level of detail and vocabulary, and then begin to question how we know that photosynthesis occurs, if we can’t see it happening. Elodea is a common water plant that students can use to directly observe evidence of photosynthesis. When Elodea is placed in a glass beaker near a good light source
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Cellular Respiration and Population Growth
Two lessons and their associated activities explore cellular respiration and population growth in yeasts. Yeast cells are readily obtained and behave predictably, so they are very appropriate to use in middle school classrooms. In the first lesson, students are introduced to yeast respiration through its role in the production of bread and alcoholic beverages. A discussion of the effects of alcohol on the human body is used both as an attention-getting device, and as a means to convey important
Author(s): Engineering K-Ph.D. Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Engineering K-Ph.D. Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

The Growling Stomach
In this lesson, the students will investigate what types of plants and insects they could eat to survive in the Amazon. They will research various plants and/or insects and identify characteristics that make them edible or useful for the trip. The students will create posters and present their findings to the class.
Author(s): Adventure Engineering,

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Copyright 2011 - Adventure Engineering, Colorado School of Mines,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Where's the Water?
In this lesson, the students will conduct an investigation to purify water. Students will engineer a method for cleaning water, discover the most effective way to filter water, and practice conducting a scientific experiment.
Author(s): Adventure Engineering,

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Copyright 2011 - Adventure Engineering, Colorado School of Mines,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Discover maths for chemists
Discover Maths for Chemists is a service from the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) which aims to improve the mathematical skills of chemistry graduates by providing a single point of access for UK resources designed to assist students to combine mathematics with chemistry.
Author(s): No creator set

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1.2.3 Pie charts: Nuclear power stations
This Unit will introduce you to a number of ways of representing data graphically and of summarising data numerically. You will learn the uses for pie charts, bar charts, histograms and scatterplots. You will also be introduced to various ways of summarising data and methods for assessing location and dispersion.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

1.3.2: Pie charts: surgical removal of tattoos
This Unit will introduce you to a number of ways of representing data graphically and of summarising data numerically. You will learn the uses for pie charts, bar charts, histograms and scatterplots. You will also be introduced to various ways of summarising data and methods for assessing location and dispersion.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

D-Day Invasion of Europe (2:01)
On June 6, 1944, Allied troops storm the beaches of Normandy in the largest amphibious assault in history. This is a good video that explains what happens on this day and has excellent graphics and clear explanations. A map of the area would be of benefit.





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Electrochemistry and Detection of Organic and Biological Molecules such as Catechols
This ASDL online article describes a lab experiment whereby students learn how to prepare a conducting thin-film polymer electrode for the analysis of catechol and the effect of ascorbic acid on the cyclic voltammetric results.
Author(s): Suzanne Lunsford

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