2.2 Surfaces in space

In this section we present a wide range of examples of surfaces in space.


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1.6.6 Professional bodies and societies

Consider joining a learned society or professional organisation. They can be very useful for conference bulletins as well as in-house publications, often included in the subscription. Don't forget to ask about student rates. Try looking for the websites of learned societies associated with your subject area (e.g. The Royal Society, the Author(s): The Open University

4.2 Subdivisions

In this subsection we formalise the idea of a net by introducing a useful concept called a subdivision of a surface. This is a standard kind of net drawn on a surface, and is defined in terms of vertices, edges and faces. It leads to the idea of the Euler characteristic of the surface.

All surfaces obtained from polygons by identifying edges arise from a net (of sorts) consisting of a single polygonal face, together with the edges and vertices that remain aft
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Alien Encounter Answer
Mathematical logical puzzle.
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3.3 What can genres do for you?

Think of it like this: each genre novel suggests certain char
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1.4 Summary of Unit A2

In this unit, you have learned about boxplots and about ways of dealing with data given in tabular form.

A boxplot is a way of presenting certain summary statistics and other characteristics of a data set in graphical form. It gives a quick graphical impression of the location, dispersion and the general pattern of skewness in data set, as well as drawing attention to unusually large or small values. In comparing two or more data sets, it is often useful to draw comparative boxplots (th
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to choose from on a range of subjects. 

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3.1.1 Try some yourself

Activity 19

In a supermarket the bill comes to £8.70, and you have discount coupons worth £3.50. The assistant says ‘that will be £12.20 please’. Is she right?


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1.3.1 Try some yourself

Activity 1

Round the numbers below:

  • (a) to the nearest 10.

  • (b) to the nearest 100.

  • (c) to the nearest 1000.

 
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Using and managing waste
Do you know what happens to the things you throw away? Sustainable management of municipal and industrial waste is essential in any society, but is particularly crucial for a future in which we face diminishing resources and a growing population. This album considers the issues that are driving the waste management industry across the EU, looking in depth at processes of recycling, landfill, incineration, obtaining energy from waste, and composting. In the bonus audio tracks Professor Andrew Por
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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

George Washington Carver: "I'm a Peanut, Let Me Be!" | SUNG HISTORY
George Washington Carver was a great friend of the farmer... but he's a peanut's worst nightmare! (02:27)
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5 ‘Indian’ on the outside

In 1801 and 1805, first Holland and then his assistant William Porden (1775–1822) had been commissioned to make sketches for altering the exterior to a Chinese style so as to match the extravagantly Chinese interiors, but these projects remained unfulfilled ( Plate 14 ). Drawing on the pictorial records brought back by William Alexander f
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 Licence

Course image: William Warby in Flick
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3.3 The purpose of the formal review meeting

The purpose of this meeting is to:

  • review performance against agreed objectives, and also in overall leadership of the school;

  • agree objectives for the next year;

  • set dates for in-year monitoring of progress.

A statement must be agreed between the headteacher and governors that covers all of these areas, and which may be seen by the appropriate committee of the governing body when they review the head
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7.1 Evidence required

This Part is about showing you can develop a strategy for using and improving your number skills, monitor your progress, and evaluate your overall performance and strategy. The evidence you present must show what you have done as you worked through the processes of planning strategically, monitoring, evaluating and presenting your work. Part A must relate directly to the work you have selected for Part B.

You must present evidence to show you can:

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3.19 Practical examples of negative numbers

Negative numbers occur in financial matters, in temperature or height measurements and many other practical situations.

Example 26

  • (a) If the value of a painting increases by £20 a year and it is worth £200 today, how much will it be worth in a year's time
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3.3.3 Higher aromatics

Benzene rings can be fused in various ways to create component parts for some of the complex aromatic repeat units shown in Table 5. One of the most important is bisphenol A, made by fusing two phenol rings with acetone:

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2 Sources of help

This assessment course is designed to be self-contained. However you might like to access the following sources for support and guidance if you need it. These sources include:

  • U529_1 Key skills – making a difference: This OpenLearn course is designed to complement the assessment courses. It provides detailed guidance and activities to help you work on your key skills, gives examples of key skills work from students, and helps you prepare and s
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5.2.1 Discrete variables

The charts about different modes of transport and that on attendance figures at a range of cultural events all use what might be called ‘word categories’. Each category (e.g. bus, rail, cycle, and walk) is quite distinct from any other in the set of categories. Such distinct categories are known in mathematics as ‘discrete variables’.

Word categories are not the only type of variable that is discrete; numbers can also be discrete. For example, at the beginning of this section, w
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5.1 EU law

The main sources of EU law are:

  • EU primary legislation, represented by the treaties

  • EU secondary legislation, in the form of regulations, directives, decisions, recommendations and opinions

  • rulings on cases brought before the European Court of Justice.

EU law is created by the legislative powers with which the EU member states have invested the EU institutions. The law created by EU institutions is al
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