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8.2 Broadening perception

Particular perspectives and points of view underpin speaking and writing. Being successful at many academic tasks, including balanced argument, often requires us to be conscious of and to try to break away from our usual perspectives and ways of thinking, and to attend to things we might not normally notice. The challenge is often to be more open-minded and broad in our thinking, to consider more than one point of view in the way that the caffeine article did. It can be useful to have strateg
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2.6 The portrayal of traditional symbols of power

Napoleon on his Imperial Throne is crammed with traditional symbols of power. The sceptre surmounted by a statuette, the other sceptre (the ‘hand of justice’) and the sword all had associations with Charlemagne. In the run-up to the coronation, the regime had adopted as official propaganda the flattering notion of Napoleon as a modern Charlemagne (which was already current, as we have seen from David's portrait). Much effort was expended on legitimating his imperial authority by li
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Acknowledgements

The material acknowledged below is Proprietary and used under licence (not subject to Creative Commons licence). See Terms and Conditions.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following for permission to reproduce:

Course image: tom_bullock in Flickr made available under Author(s): The Open University

Concerns over Crimea's future rise in Ukraine
Subscribe: http://smarturl.it/reuterssubscribe More Breaking News: http://smarturl.it/BreakingNews Feb. 25 - The mainly Russian-speaking territory of Crimea has become a topic of intense discussion following recent political upheaval in Ukraine. Nathan Frandino reports. Reuters tells the world's stories like no one else. As the largest international multimedia news provider, Reuters provides coverage around the globe and across topics including business, financial, national, and international
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Fluid Dynamics of Drag part 4
Fluid Dynamics of Drag part 4
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4.4 Professional values and a code of practice

Student teachers on school experience will be treated as professional colleagues and this role brings with it the professional responsibilities all teachers share, as well as the requirement for a degree of sensitivity as a visitor in the school. All who are awarded qualified teacher status must uphold the professional code of the General Teaching Council and demonstrate professional values and practice. The following areas have been identified as important for student teachers to consider as
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7.4 Closing thoughts

Of course, doing anything about this needs scientific evidence and understanding, but it also requires social, economic and technological changes, which can only be achieved through political will. If you want to explore some of the broader context, a good place to start would be the New Internationalist issue 357, ‘The Big Switch: Climate Change Solutions’ at New Internationalist.

Faced with the sort of predictions climatologists are making, is it sufficient for science teac
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Acknowledgements

Course image: Jim Nix in Flickr made available under Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this course:

This content is made availabl
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Introduction

This unit is from our archive and it is an adapted extract from Human Biology and Health (SK220) which is no longer in presentation. If you wish to study formally at The Open University, you may wish to explore the courses we offer in this curriculum area .

This unit looks at the human being in the context of an individual life
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2.1 How do we use maps?

Reading about maps, I have been struck by the number of times that the idea of ‘maps as part of our everyday experience’ has been mentioned. In fact, I was thinking about it recently, when I was preparing to travel from Belfast to London. I left home with a mental map of my journey to the airport – but on the way I found that the road was blocked by a burst water main. ‘Plan B’ was to consult my local road map for the quickest alternative and, in doing so, I wondered i
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1.6.5 Folate (folic acid, vitamin B9)

Folate is a generic name for a group of related compounds. The name ‘folate’ was based on the word ‘foliage’, after it was identified in a crude extract from spinach, though it is also found in liver, other green vegetables, oranges and potatoes and it is often added to breakfast cereals (usually listed as folic acid). Folate is less sensitive to heat than many of the B vitamins, though it is destroyed if food is reheated or kept hot for long periods. Folate is involved in amino acid
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Bla bla met ma en pa
1.png

'Seks? De bloemetjes en de bijtjes? Ja ja, dat weet ik allemaal wel.' Grote denkfout! Want weet je al àlle mogelijkheden en àlle voorwaarden? Het is goed om er eens met je ouders over te praten. Bijvoorbeeld als je met anticonceptie …


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1.4.1 Salicylic acid

The structural formula of salicylic acid, 2.1, looks quite complicated. However, it becomes less daunting if you unpack it a bit. One of the first things to do when confronted with an unfamiliar structure is to check that all the valencies are correct (four for carbon, two for oxygen and one for hydrogen). If any atoms have the wrong valency, it follows that there is a mistake somewhere and the molecule does not exist as drawn. It looks OK for the structure of salicylic acid. You proba
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Automobiles Freed Us from the Tyranny of Horses
By: Ryan McMaken
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Thanks to the automobile, Americans live in an age of extremely inexpensive transportation, by historical measures. 

In the United States in 2015, there was approximately one motor vehicle per 1.21 people. With the excepti
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Rights not set

Domm 1519 - 15 08 15 (1)

Edital do processo seletivo para estagiários - Secretaria Municipal da Educação de Marília - SP

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References

Badham, B. and Wade, H. (revised edition 2005) Hear By Right Standards for the Active Involvement of Children and Young People, Leicester and London: National Youth Agency and Local Government Association.
Leverett, S. (2008) ‘Children's participation’ in Foley, P. and Leverett, S. (eds) Connecting with Children: Developing Working Relationships, Bristol: Policy Press.
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5.1 Introduction to the social construction of scientific knowledge

This section explores how scientific knowledge and scientific literacy can be built up through working in communities of practice (groups of people who work together and share a common language). We also look at issues relating to the ideas of subjectivity and objectivity, and at deductive and inductive thinking. Finally, we explore the public understanding of science by examining how society, in wider terms, constructs or influences scientific thinking and understanding.


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3.1 Insect resistance

We will now look briefly at the science underlying the traits introduced into commercial crops, which you explored in Activity 1; a useful place to start is by considering how the property of resistance to insects is acquired by crops.

Insect damage causes huge losses of agricultural crops each year. For example, without co
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