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Season 3 – Lesson 29 – Coffee Break Spanish
Coming up in this episode:

In this week’s episode, Alba and Mark are en la cocina, making a Spanish tortilla. The episode is slightly different from our usual episodes as the audio was recorded live in the kitchen rather than in the studio. There’s no “Act II” this week as the conversation follows the entire process of making the tortilla.

Please note that lesson 29 of Season 3 was originally known as lesson 329 of Coffee Break Spanish. We have renumbered
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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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6.8 Sharing behaviour between use cases

For each use case there may be more than one scenario. In the process of requirements elicitation and specification, you may find a certain amount of common behaviour in two or more of your use cases. You may even find that an existing component can provide part or all of that common or shared behaviour. Indeed, if you do find such an existing component, this is an example of reusing requirements which is discussed more fully in MRP.

You can record the shared behaviour in
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Introduction

Anti-social behaviour, homelessness, drugs, metal illness: all problems in today’s society. But what makes a problem social? This unit will help you to discover how these issues are identified, defined, given meaning and acted upon. You will also look at the conflicts within social science in this area.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Social Policy: Welfare, Power and Diversity (D218) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want
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2.3.1 Structural isomerism

In the saturated hydrocarbons, whose structural formulae are shown in Figure 16, it is not possible to form distinct isomers with just three or less carbon atoms linked together. There is only one way in which one carbon and four hydrogen atoms can be linked together, the single compound being methane, CH4. A simila
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1 What are scattering and tunnelling?

The phenomenon of scattering was an important topic in physics long before the development of wave mechanics. In its most general sense, scattering is a process in which incident particles (or waves) are affected by interaction with some kind of target, quite possibly another particle (Figure 1). The interac
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5.1 Reasons for unclear meaning

The meaning of law in a statute should be clear and explicit, but this is not always achieved. Thus, many of the cases which come before the courts concern a dispute over the meaning of a word or phrase in a statute. In those cases the task of the court is to decide the exact meaning of that particular word or phrase. There are a number of factors which can lead to an unclear meaning.

  • A broad term – There may be words designed to cover several
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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Computing & IT. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance, and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


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4.5 Fibre in LANs

Fibre has been slower to be exploited in LANs than in the core transmission network, for similar reasons to the delay in the use of fibre in the access network, but as the data rate demanded of LANs has increased, the case for using fibre has strengthened.

Although Ethernet specifications (IEEE 802.3 series) have contained standards for the use of fibre backbones for some time, it was with the development of Gigabit Ethernet and 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10 GbE) standards that fibre became t
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07A - Néodocument : Métadonnées (CN15-16) (Vidéo)

Cours commun de culture numérique 2015-2016 - Hervé Le Crosnier

M1-DNR2i, Licence Professionnelle ATP, M1-EMT, M1-ESPE, M2-MDS, M2-Green

Amphi S3-049, Bâtiment Sciences S3, Campus Côte de Nacre

Le vendredi, de 14h à 16h

Ces cours sont ouverts aux auditeurs libres

Ces cours sont filmés par le CEMU (Centre d’Enseignement Multimédia Universitaire)


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4.5 Endocrine disruptors

Then he was a she…

(Lou Reed, American rock singer)

In 1996, a book called Our Stolen Future was published, bringing to public attention a debate that had been simmering among biologists for some time. Written by Theo Colborn and two colleagues at the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), this book presented the hypothesis that certain industrial chemicals, commonly found as environmental pol
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions) and is used under licence.

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

Unit Image

Krystia
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7.2 Should I unsubscribe from mailing lists?

Many spam messages have a line at the bottom offering to unsubscribe you from a mailing list, but you should be very wary of doing this. Quite often the senders of the spam will use the 'unsubscribe' option to verify that your email address is live. They may then sell your address to other people for use in spamming. So using the unsubscribe option can increase your spam rather than reduce it. Our advice is never to use the unsubscribe option unless the mail you receive is from a well-known,
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Introduction

This unit is an adapted extract from the course Pure mathematics (M208)

The idea of vectors and conics may be new to you. In this unit we look at some of the ways that we represent points, lines and planes in mathematics.

In Section 1 we revise coordinate geometry in two-dimensional Euclidean space,
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Harvesting Oil from the Earth
In this lesson, students investigate sources of fossil fuels, particularly oil. Students will learn how engineers and scientists look for oil by taking core samples from a model of the Earth. Also, students will explore and analyze oil consumption and production in the United States and around the world.
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PE.550 Designing Your Life (MIT)
This course provides an exciting, eye-opening, and thoroughly useful inquiry into what it takes to live an extraordinary life, on your own terms. The instructors address what it takes to succeed, to be proud of your life, and to be happy in it. Participants tackle career satisfaction, money, body, vices, and relationship to themselves. They learn how to confront issues in their lives, how to live life, and how to learn from it. A short version of this course meets during the Independent Activit
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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

HST.921 Information Technology in the Health Care System of the Future (MIT)
This innovative, trans-faculty subject teaches how information technologies (IT) are reshaping and redefining the health care marketplace through improved economies of scale, greater technical efficiencies in the delivery of care to patients, advanced tools for patient education and self-care, network integrated decision support tools for clinicians, and the emergence of e-commerce in health care. Student tutorials provide an opportunity for interactive discussion. Interdisciplinary project team
Author(s): Bryan Bergeron,Daniel Sands,Steven Locke,Mirena Ba

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

Acknowledgements
Have you ever wondered how scientists analyse the environment? This unit introduces you to the techniques used by science students at residential schools. You will learn how to determine where rocks have come from and how they were made. You will also examine the processes involved in determining the ecology of a particular area.
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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Learning outcomes
Have you ever wondered how scientists analyse the environment? This unit introduces you to the techniques used by science students at residential schools. You will learn how to determine where rocks have come from and how they were made. You will also examine the processes involved in determining the ecology of a particular area.
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Acknowledgements
Some of Britain’s most dramatic scenery is to be found in the Scottish Highlands. The sight of mighty Ben Nevis, the desolate plateau of the Cairngorms, or the imposing landscapes of Glen Coe can unleash the call of the wild in all of us. Although these landforms were largely carved by glacial activity that ended some 10,000 years ago, the rocks themselves tell of a much older history. The Highlands are merely eroded stumps of a much higher range of ancient mountains. This unit is an account o
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