APPLICATION OF SPATIAL DESIGN ABILITY IN A POSTGRADUATE COURSE
Spatial Design Ability (SDA) has been defined by the author (1983) as the capacity to anticipate the effects (psychological impressions) that architectural spaces or its components produce in observers or users. This concept, which requires the evaluation of spaces by the people that uses it, was proposed as a guideline to a Masters Degree Course in Architectural Design at the Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes in Mexico. The theory and the exercises required for the experience needed a mode
Author(s): Abad? Abbo, Isaac

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Acknowledgements

Amanda Burrows is a graduate of Laban and gained an MA in Education from The Open University. She has taught dance in secondary schools, FE colleges, universities and in community settings. Amanda is currently Head of Curriculum for Visual, Performing Arts and Media at Grantham College, and has produced materials for the Open Univerity's Teachandlearn.net, repurposed here for openlearn.

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3 Key skills assessment courses

This section gives advice and guidance to help you compile and present a portfolio of selected work. You are strongly advised to read through this section so that you have an idea of what is expected.

The key skills assessment courses provide an opportunity for you to integrate your development of key skills with your work or study. You may choose to concentrate on skills that you need to develop and improve for your job, for a new course, or personally to help you keep abreast of new d
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2.2.2 Drawing the boundary

Deciding where to place the system boundary is an important consideration in that we have to think about what to include and exclude. This isn't always an easy decision to make and it often depends on the perspective of the person viewing the system.

The system maps in Figures 1
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4.3 Dilemmas of climate change

In Section 4.1, we looked at claims that climatic change thousands of years ago triggered the movement of people into the ocean, eventually leading to the settling of islands like Tuvalu. We have also seen that these islands only rose out of the ocean because of dynamic geological processes coupled with dramatic changes i
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Acknowledgements

This course was written by Dr Robert Philip.

This free course is an adapted extract from the course A207 From Enlightenment to Romanticism, which is currently out of presentation

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5.1.3 Film Studies

Bawden, L.-A. (ed.) (1976) The Oxford Companion to Film, Oxford, Oxford University Press.


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Lesson 10 - One Minute Romanian
In lesson 10 of One Minute Romanian you will learn a few useful phrases which all learners want to learn. Remember - even a few phrases of a language can help you make friends and enjoy travel more. Find out more about One Minute Romanian at our website - http://www.oneminutelanguages.com. One Minute Romanian is brought to you by the Radio Lingua Network and is ©Copyright 2008.Author(s): No creator set

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12 Salience of Transport Pricing
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4.3 Thermally activated processes

Thermally activated processes are those that get going not because of average effects, but because the fraction of particles in the tail of the distribution increases with temperature. This is a basic property of the thermal distribution we have been discussing. For instance, what would take 30 000 years at room temperature may happen in under one second at 1000 K if it depends on how many particles have an energy in excess of 1 eV.

The next step in the study of energy distribu
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De Carle Lectures 2012: Professor James Cox – Making Mwari Christian: The Case of the Shona of Zim
Professor Emeritus James Cox of the University of Edinburgh presents his 2012 De Carle lecture on the topic of “Making Mwari Christian: The case of the Shona of Zimbabwe”. 16 May 2012.
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3.6.3 Balancing emotional commitment with awareness and understanding

People's first donation is often prompted by an instinctive and emotional response to a direct appeal. Very rarely is it an informed or carefully calculated decision. Building on that initial response requires you to balance a recognition of your donors’ emotional investment with a need to develop their understanding and awareness of your cause and concerns – the head and heart messages central to your case statement. See Author(s): The Open University

3.1 The NSPCC's 'FULL STOP' campaign

An example of a marketing communications campaign is given below. This National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Childred (NSPCC) campaign was named a ‘Campaign of the Year’ in the CIM&Sol;Marketing Week's 1999 marketing effectiveness awards.

Example 3 NSPCC's 'FULL STOP' campaign

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4 Unit summary

Sound recording really took off once the public's demand for recorded music had been acknowledged. The choice of technology, cylinder or disc, was determined more by the selection of the artist and material than the quality of the sound. Development of disc technology was slow due to the lack of better alternatives, remaining substantially unchanged for over fifty years. The development of radio broadcasting caused a slump in the record industry but eventually it not only provided improvement
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Grammar Representations to Facilitate Style Innovation - An Example From Mobile Phone Design
Previous research in generative design has suggested that shape grammar transformations could be used for developing new design styles by the systematic modification of grammars that encode existing styles. Our research explores how such grammar transformations can be facilitated to be responsive to changes in design style requirements. For this it is important to consider the structure and organization of rules, as well as the description of the styles of designs generated by a grammar. Using a
Author(s): Ahmad, Sumbul and Scott Chase

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1.2.7 In praise of cheap offshore labour?

Claims over the benefits of globalisation and the exploitation of cheap offshore labour generate strong feelings and, not surprisingly, divide opinion between those who favour the global marketplace and its detractors. The issue turns on whether the constant search for ever-cheaper manufacturing and service locations is seen as a good or a bad thing. It may appear odd, at first, to suggest that exploiting the poor of another country can, on any measure, be regarded as a good thing, but
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2.2.2 Hollow tubing surfaces

In their doughnut-shaped representation, toruses can be thought of as being hollow tubes. Many other surfaces in space can also be drawn as if they were made of hollow tubing. Figure 15 shows two such examples.

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Except for third party materials and/or otherwise stated (see terms and conditions) the content in OpenLearn is released for use under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-Share

3.1 Introduction

As well as looking at the behaviour of firms and the industries and markets to which they belong, economists also engage in a different style of inquiry, thinking about what economic change means for the lives of the people involved. Once again there is a variety of interpretations and different ideas but this time they concern the desirability of economic change. What benefits does the ‘new economy’ bring and what costs, or negative effects, does it impose on people? In analysing these b
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4.1.1 Disability discrimination legislation

This activity uses the UK Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) Part 4 as the basis for discussing the concept of making reasonable adjustments. The DDA may not apply to you directly, but many countries have similar legislation. We feel the underlying principles of such legislation reflect the moral standpoint or the right thing to do, regardless of whether or not legislation exists.


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5.1 Introduction

We have seen some of the difficulties that Mrs Biggs has faced when formulating a sufficiently general and sufficiently specific rule to deal with the conduct of the visitors to her garden. In Part D we take things a step further by looking at some of the difficulties which may arise when it comes to interpreting rules such as the one developed (with your help) by Mrs Biggs. In particular, we will be exploring the way in which our understanding of the language used in rules affects our interp
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