9.01 Introduction to Neuroscience (MIT)
This course is an introduction to the mammalian nervous system, with emphasis on the structure and function of the human brain. Topics include the function of nerve cells, sensory systems, control of movement, learning and memory, and diseases of the brain.
Author(s): Bear, Mark,Seung, Sebastian

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7.391 Concept-Centered Teaching (MIT)
Do you like teaching, but find yourself frustrated by how little students seem to learn? Would you like to try teaching, but are nervous about whether you will be any good at it? Are you interested in new research on science education? Research in science education shows that the greatest obstacle to student learning is the failure to identify and confront the misconceptions with which the students enter the class or those that they acquire during their studies. This weekly seminar course focuse
Author(s): Khodor, Julia

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3.1 Statutes and Acts of the UK Parliament

There are a number of ways in which our laws are created. As it is recognised as the supreme law-making body, we will start by considering the UK Parliament's role in law making.

The UK Author(s): The Open University

2.2 Finding out about social work

There is evidence that public knowledge about social work in Scotland is ‘fairly low’, with apparent confusion between social services and welfare benefits – ‘the social’ – and over the boundaries between social work and social care. The MORI survey also reported that those most likely to be in need of social support – older people, lower social income and minority ethnic groups – were particularly ill informed about availability and access to services (Davidson and King, 2005
Author(s): The Open University

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4.5 Technologies and the tacit dimension

In this unit we have discussed the intriguing notion of tacit knowledge, or perhaps better, knowing as a situated process. What might it mean to provide technological support which exploits the tacit dimension? If ‘tacit’ can mean ‘not yet codified, but could be’ in Nonaka and Takeuchi's (1995) sense, then we can devise computer systems that assist in formalising information and ‘transforming’ it into explicit, shared knowledge to feed the knowledge spiral. However, if ‘
Author(s): The Open University

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Cijferend optellen en aftrekken tot 10 000
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Werkblad waarmee leerlingen het cijferend optellen en aftrekken tot 10 000 (zonder en met ontlening bij 1, 2 of 3 cijfers) inoefenen.


Author(s): No creator set

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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • practise identification of ‘indigenous’ identity and culture

  • practise identification of ‘Roman’ identity and culture

  • study the development of Romano-African culture.


Author(s): The Open University

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6.2 Modes of managing systemically

Now I want to describe some of the possibilities I see as being available in the repertoire of an aware systems practitioner able to connect with the history of systems thinking and with the new theories of complexity.

David Robertson, in a presentation to the Society for Research into Higher Education in late 1998 entitled ‘What employers really, really want’ reported that: ‘research on employers in a number of English-speaking countries (an elite survey with senior corporate peo
Author(s): The Open University

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11.5 Programming languages

A computer program is written in a programming language and contains the instructions that tell the computer what to do. Developers write new software using specialised programming languages. The resulting programs (or 'source code') can be converted into the low-level instructions understood by the processor. There is a wide range of programming languages to suit different types of task; if you look at advertisements for programming jobs in newspapers or online you will get an idea of
Author(s): The Open University

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Lesson 03 - One Minute Romanian
In lesson 3 of One Minute Romanian you will learn to say that you can speak a little Romanian. Remember - even a few phrases of a language can help you make friends and enjoy travel more. Find out more about One Minute Romanian at our website - http://www.oneminutelanguages.com. One Minute Romanian is brought to you by the Radio Lingua Network and is ©Copyright 2008.Author(s): No creator set

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2.4.3 abelling

The term ‘informal carer’ is a label. It was coined to describe people who take on unpaid responsibility for the welfare of another person. It is a term which has meaning only when the public world of care provision comes into contact with the private world of the family where caring is a day-to-day, unremarked-upon activity, like reminding a young child to clean her teeth. Labelling yourself as an informal carer requires a major shift in the way you see yourself, a shift neither Arthur n
Author(s): The Open University

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Memory of Maestro Charles Vest
President Charles Vest conducting the "Stars and Stripes Forever" at Tech Night at the POPS during MIT's Reunion Week, June, 2004. A video reprise.
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3.6.6 Teach to learn

One of the most successful ways to learn something well is to teach it. Select a topic that you feel you know well and try teaching it to an imaginary person. As your teaching proceeds, you will quickly realise where there are gaps in your knowledge and understanding. Immediately you will begin to identify clearly what it is you are explaining. You will become aware of any aspects that you are less clear about, and can focus on those. Imagine you are explaining something to someone who keenly
Author(s): The Open University

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1.3 The perils of partnership: policy as an adaptive system

Here the focus is on an organic way of understanding the relationship between policy and action. From this perspective, government, public service organisations, contractors, staff and, more recently, the public themselves are viewed not as cogs in a machine but as mutually interacting elements of an adaptive policy system. As in other organic entities – populations, species, even the human body itself – change takes place around an equilibrium point at which the entity is in balan
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

School governors need the skills to develop working relationships with the school community. This unit will help you to understand what each stakeholder within the community needs, from headteacher to pupils and parents. Effective interaction between all parties can prevent problems from arising.


Author(s): The Open University

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Conclusion

This free course provided an introduction to studying Science. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.


Author(s): The Open University

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1 Expectations and administrative pressures

The medical prognoses and diagnoses of dying raise expectations of what will actually happen to the dying person. For example, someone is diagnosed with terminal lung cancer, they will be given a forecast that covers the estimated length of time before death, any likely symptoms, the development of the illness, and possible treatment(s). Of course, these types of medical expectations are not unique to death and dying: they are found in all treatments of illness, and no doubt you will have had
Author(s): The Open University

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Virtual Maths, Brick Density, Water Displacement method video
Video demonstrating how to measure the density of a brick using the water displacement method.
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

5.5 Multiple-cause diagrams

Multiple-cause diagrams are another way of using interconnectedness to structure a complex situation. In this case, the interconnectedness is that of causation. Multiple-cause diagrams represent both sufficient and contributory cause, without making a distinction between them. Drawing multiple-cause diagrams allows for the identification of systems of causation. Such a system can be pictured as an interconnected group of events or effects; the effect is of a system that behaves
Author(s): The Open University

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7.3 Summary of Section 7

  • The historian Linda Colley locates the birth of ‘Britain’ after 1707. She mentions three main factors that contributed to establishing the British nation: war, religion and the prospect of material advantage.

  • The creation of the UK was not free from conflict, resistance, war and military intervention.

  • The British Empire generated a unique opportunity for most UK nations to participate and enjoy some of the benefits it brough
    Author(s): The Open University

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