6.2.10 Portals

A portal is a website which collects catalogues and characterises a huge amount of information. By displaying a large number of hyperlinks such sites provide an entrance (or portal) to the World Wide Web. Search engines originally provided fairly basic searching facilities; however, the past two years has seen them evolve Portals on the nncmci into portals. Portals are categorised as either horizontal portals or vertical portals. A vertical portal offers an entrance to large am
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The range of work with young people
This free course, The range of work with young people, identifies some features that we might use to describe the various settings where work with young people takes place. This encourages us to identify similarities and differences between settings. It then introduces some theoretical perspectives to help us review these settings and thus understand more about the experience for young people and workers. Finally, it uses these perspectives to analyse examples of different settings, relating the
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The ‘why’ and ‘what’ of educational leadership and management
This free course, The 'why' and 'what' of educational leadership and management, introduces you to researching educational leadership and management and how undertaking research can contribute to both good practice and the building of leadership capacity. First published on Wed, 17 Feb 2016 as Author(s): Creator not set

Teaching citizenship: Work and the economy
The issue of 'citizenship, work and the economy' is often neglected in everyday discussions of citizenship. But a moment's reflection should demonstrate how important it is. The vast majority of us will spend the bulk of our adult lives working in some context or another, and our engagement with economic activity more generally is obvious (and not just as consumers). Many young people are also intimately tied up with work. School children often have part-time evening, weekend or holiday jobs of
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Advanced German: Regional landscapes
German regions and landscapes, local traditions and the notion of Heimat are at the centre of this free course, Advanced German: Regional landscapes. You will describe images, make notes from a variety of sources, and write a short piece about the three-nations region around Lake Constance. First published on Tue, 16 Oct 2018 as Author(s): Creator not set

Introduction

This course introduces you to the concepts of:

  • open educational resources (OERs)
  • issues involved in the creation, use and re-use, and pedagogy of OERs
  • a range of tools and media to support you in developing your own teaching and learning practices.

It will provide you with the skills and confidence to engage in further OER work as both creator and user.

Find out more about studying with The Open University by 
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5.2.2 The emergency stop technique

This exercise is an emergency relaxation technique to counteract panic and the build up of tension.

  1. Say sharply to yourself STOP! (aloud if the situation permits).

  2. Breathe in and hold your breath for a moment before slowly exhaling. As you do so, relax your shoulders and hands.

  3. Pause for a moment, then breathe in slowly again and hold. This time, as you breathe out relax your forehead and jaw.

  4. Stay qu
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3.2 Stage 1: Finding out about the exam paper

As a first step, it is a good idea to find out as much as you can about the exam paper for your course. Find out how your exam paper is set out, the way the questions are organised, and what weight each question carries in terms of marks. Different papers adopt different formats. Some require multiple-choice answers. Others ask for essay or short paragraph answers. Some require technical or numerical answers. Reading the instructions on the exam paper is particularly important, as the followi
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3.1 What is revision?

Revision is not, as the word suggests, simply 'looking again' at the material covered in a course - it is a more active task. It involves organising material and finding ways of remembering it, that suit your own particular learning style. Although the time you set aside for revision is important, the approach you adopt and the techniques you use to revise are more vital. Sometimes the thought of having to revise can seem daunting, but be reassured, revision skills and techniques can be learn
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1 Revision and exams

Most likely, you are reading this course because you feel unsure about your ability to do yourself justice in exams. You may never have taken an exam and are wondering how to prepare yourself. It may have been a long time since you took an exam, and you feel a need to refresh your technique. You may be looking for reassurance and advice because you may have had a bad exam experience in the past. Whatever your reason, we hope that this course will help.

This course is a practical one, an
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • manage time more effectively when revising and in the exam itself

  • learn, or brush up on, revision and exam skills

  • feel equipped to approach exams with less anxiety and stress.


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6.2.3 Precise reference to ‘linear’ texts

You may find it more difficult to provide evidence from texts in which sounds, words or images follow on from one another over time (such as music and videos, plays and novels). Music is perhaps particularly hard to pin down. Sounds weave in and out of each other so that at first you may experience the music as seamless. But there are different ‘movements’ or ‘passages’ in music; moments at which a ‘melody’ is first introduced and later passages when it is repeated, for example. Y
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3.2 Tables: Activities

Activity 3

Imagine that you have been asked to investigate population growth in the EU. You might be considering the details of population growth or you may be thinking about representing the reasons for population gro
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • reflect on the reasons for needing to improve skills in using charts, graphs and tables

  • understand the following mathematical concepts and how to use them, through instruction, worked examples and practice activities: reflecting on mathematics; tables; line graphs; bar charts and histograms; pie charts; analysis

  • draw on a technical glossary, plus a a list of references to further reading and sources
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7 Further reading and sources of help

Where to get more help with using and interpreting tables, graphs, percentages, and with other aspects of numerical work.


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4.8.2 Median

The median is the middle value of a set of numbers arranged in ascending (or descending) order. If the set has an even number of values then the median is the mean of the two middle numbers. For example:

1, 1, 2, 5, 8, 10, 12, 15, 24This set of nine values is arranged in ascending order and the median is 8.
32, 25, 20, 1
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1.3.3 Stage 1: Preparation

The task here is very different from our task when faced with numbers, where we need to deal with a high level of abstraction. Writing is often dense and multi-layered, and usually gives us, if anything, too much surface information about our subject. We need to make a mental effort this time in selecting and abstracting information ourselves. In order to do this effectively we need to be aware of the context of the writing. We need to check if we can, for instance, the political and s
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8.5 Constructing bibliographies

At the end of your assignments you need to include a bibliography or list of references. This is an alphabetical list of all the sources that you have used – each chapter, book and article that you refer to in the main body of your discussion. Bibliographies take a particular form and usually involve listing the:

  • author's name,

  • date of publication,

  • title of the piece, and

  • details of the publisher.


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Introduction

This course is about the very basic study skills of reading and taking notes. You will be asked to think about how you currently read and then be introduced to a some techniques that may help you to alter the way you read according to the material you are studying. In the second section you will be asked to look at some useful techniques for note taking and how you may apply them to the notes you make.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 1 study in Author(s): The Open University

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