Lesson 10 - One Minute Luxembourgish
In lesson 10 of One Minute Luxembourgish you will learn a few useful phrases which all learners want to learn. Remember - even a few phrases of a language can help you make friends and enjoy travel more. Find out more about One Minute Languages at our website - http://www.oneminutelanguages.com. One Minute Luxembourgish is brought to you by the Radio Lingua Network and is ©Copyright 2008.
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4.4 Predicting conformation from sequence

Given the amino acid sequence of a protein, it is possible to use computational methods to try to fit the sequence into folding patterns. This operation is called ‘threading’. Different conformations can be ranked according to how well they accommodate the sequence; that is, the most stable conformation is ranked highest. Of course, this technique can only be used for those folds that have been definitively described by X-ray diffraction or NMR, and the structure of those proteins whose s
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How to Learn Spanish Fast with Learning Paths
Start learning with your Free Lifetime Account at SpanishPod101.com
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Rights not set

2 The Ordovician seas

Before going any further, click on 'View document' below and read pages 68-71 from Douglas Palmer's Atlas of the Prehistoric World.

View document

Collecting seashells on an Ordovician beach would have been a rather curious experience. Whilst most shells were made of similar materials to those found on a modern beach, the detailed form of many would have
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3.1 Bullying – children as victims

In countries of the North, much of children's daily life is divided between home and school. It is therefore in schools that many children experience violence between their peers, from either being bullied or themselves bullying.

Click here  to view Reading A

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4.2 Social and political justice

A particularly important set of debates arises in relation to different notions of distributive justice. Do notions of distributive justice apply to the rights of individuals and the acts that they commit, or do they also apply to states of affairs, to the pattern of the results arising from those actions? In the former case, an outcome is just or unjust if it arises from just or unjust actions; whereas in the latter, the principles of justice apply to the pattern of outcomes. This latter not
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3.2 What are rights?

The modern discourse of universal human rights has a number of features. The idea that everyone, everywhere has rights refers to the concept that there are certain entitlements justifiably owed to all individuals by virtue of certain features that all human beings have in common. As the nineteenth-century French politician and historian Alexis de Tocqueville put it, the idea of rights ‘removes from any request its supplicant character, and places the one who claims it on the same level as t
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2.1 Introduction

Structures are not always doomed to fail, but they do usually have a limited useful life. Exceptions include many of the monuments that have survived from the ancient world, such as the Great Pyramid in Egypt (Figure 11a), the Pont du Gard in southern France (Author(s): The Open University

2.8 Further reading

Gombrich, E.H. (1971) ‘Psycho-analysis and the history of art’ in Meditations on a Hobby Horse (2nd edn), London, Phaidon, pp. 30–44.

Iseminger, G. (ed.) (1992) Intention and Interpretation, Philadelphia, Temple University Press.

Shiff, R. (1996) ‘Originality’ in Shiff, R. and Nelson, R.S. (eds) Critical Terms for Art History, Chicago and London, The University of Chicago Press, pp. 103–15.

Soussloff, C.M. (1997) ‘The artist in myth: early
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2.6 Caravaggio's sexuality

‘Caravaggio studies’ often provide good, and sometimes extreme, examples of the ways in which an artist's identity can be bound up in his work and vice versa. In the case of Caravaggio it is difficult to avoid assumptions about his sexual orientation in any modern study of his art. Bold statements sometimes presume that this is a resolved issue: he was, for example, ‘The one major painter of the late Cinquecento whose sexuality is otherwise freely expressed in his oevre’ (Saslow, 1986
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2 Activity and questions

Listen to the following audio clip between Terry O'Sullivan, Senior Lecturer in Management at the Open University Business School, and Chris Stalker, Head of Campaigning Effectiveness at the National Council for Voluntary Organisations.

This audio clip is followed by a series of questions. It is suggested that you listen to the audio before attempting the questions.

Click to listen to the audio clip. (13 minutes)


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Diabetes care
At least 171 million people worldwide have diabetes, and this figure is set to double by 2030. This chronic condition, which occurs when the body cannot produce or effectively use the insulin it needs, can be the cause of many serious health complications leading, amongst other problems, to blindness, foot ulcers and kidney failures. This album is a must-watch for diabetes sufferers and medical staff training to work with diabetes patients. Six video tracks introduce various aspects of a patient
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Living with Disability
How does living with disability and chronic illness impact on a person's quality of life? What are the consequences of physical limitations and treatment regimes? The tracks on his album explore real-life case studies in a variety of care environments. From domestic homes to residential and hospital settings, we explore physical, social and psychological impacts and investigate the extent to which care environments are enabling or disabling. The album also contains a fictional case study which
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5.2 ‘The prioritisation of a particular group – the nation – as a key constitut

No particular form of articulating the nation is required by the formulation of this first element; the nation might be ‘imagined’ or ‘constructed’ as homogenous or as pluralistic and diverse, for example. However nationhood is imagined, though, it will invariably involve some form of suppression of alternative ways of classifying peoples. Consider that for most of us there are linguistic, class, ethnic, location, gender, religious and other aspects to our identities. If nation
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4.2.2 Network

In the same way as in the network shown in Figure 8, this network conveys the data to the receiver, selecting the most appropriate route for it to travel. In order to do this, the network may need to manipulate and store or retrieve data.

Your computer sends the FirstClass message into the internet, via your ISP connection, a
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4.2.1 First computer (your computer)

In the block diagram, the computer receives data from the user and sends it into the network. It will manipulate and also store and retrieve data.

If you send a message to a FirstClass conference, your computer receives the message from you as data via the keyboard. The computer manipulates the data into a form that can be sent into the network, in this case the internet via your internet service provider (ISP). Your computer will also store or retrieve relevant data, such as details of
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14.2 Modelling networked computers

You met a block diagram showing a model of a communication system in Figure 8. In this model, a transmitter sends data into a network which conveys it to a receiver; but how does this model work when the transmitter and receiver are computers?

Sometimes the computer's user is communicating with another computer user, (for exa
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3.1 Spoken and written modes: an overview

Variations in context that can affect grammatical choice may relate to different modes of communication, such as whether it is speech or writing, telephone or email, and so on. I am communicating with you now through the written mode. I have no idea where you are or what is motivating you to look at this course. I don't know if you are alone, inside, outside, whether it is morning, afternoon or evening. To make my meanings clear to you, I type words into a computer that fit together in
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6.2 Concepts of Illness

Sontag (1979) wrote about the metaphors we use to describe illness. Metaphors are ways of speaking about something as if it were something else which is imaginatively but not literally applicable, for instance calling a new moon a sickle. Sontag was mainly concerned with life-threatening illnesses such as cancer and AIDS, and how the metaphors we use can serve to stigmatise the sufferers, for instance referring to AIDS as a gay plague. But people use metaphors to explain illness to themselves
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Advanced Device Physics
This course will focus for a large part on MOSFET and CMOS, but also on heterojunction BJT, and photonic devices.
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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/nl/deed.en - Original copyright TU Delft