Antisense regulation of gene expression

The term antisense refers to the use of a nucleic acid that is complementary to the coding (i.e. ‘sense’) base sequence of a target gene. When nucleic acids that are antisense in nature are introduced into cells, they can hybridise to the complementary ‘sense’ mRNA through normal Watson-Crick base pairing. Synthetic antisense DNA chains as short as 15–17 nucleotides in length have been used to block specific gene expression by either physically blocking translation of the tar
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Chaperones help polypeptides to fold

We have seen how steric restrictions and energetic considerations specify preferred polypeptide conformations and ultimately determine a protein's three-dimensional structure. It is possible, of course, that there may be more than one energetically favourable conformation for a polypeptide. This is particularly true for large polypeptides. For a protein with a specific function in the cell, misfolding will affect its activity. Indeed, the misfolded protein may actually have some aberrant unde
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4.2 Altruism

How is it possible then to sustain groups in which some individuals are prevented from breeding? They would have no lifetime reproductive success, none of their characteristics could be passed on to offspring.

SAQ 17

Name
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Virtual Maths - Shapes, Space and Measure, Theodolite Survey simulation
Simulation of using a thodolite to calculate the height of a building.
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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3.5 Summary

  • Social learning theory proposes that it is possible for children to learn by observing other people.

  • Bandura found that pre-school children would copy aggressive behaviour modelled by another person, and that this was most likely if the model was similar to them in some way and not seem to be punished.

  • Social learning research has informed the ongoing debate about television being either a positive or negative influence on young
    Author(s): The Open University

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Base pairing

Nucleic acid folding patterns are dominated by base pairing, which results from the formation of hydrogen bonds between pairs of nucleotides. In nucleic acids, as in proteins, the highly directional nature of this hydrogen bonding is the key to secondary structure.

SAQ 5


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1.8 Io

David A. Rothery Teach Yourself Planets, Chapter 9, pp. 107-39, Hodder Education, 2000, 2003.

Copyright © David Rothery

Of the welter of revelations provided by the Voyager tours of the outer Solar System, the discovery of active volcanoes on Io probably ranks top of the list. Prior to this, most people had assumed that bodies of Io's size, whether rocky like Io or icy like its companions, would be geologically dead like our own, similarly sized, Moon. This i
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What's Really Going on During a Lunar Eclipse?
When we watch a lunar eclipse, what exactly are we seeing? And what is the moon's perspective of this cosmic event? Music is by Bradley Kemp. (02:34)
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • explain the difference between a mineral and a rock

  • describe the textural differences between igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks

  • account for these differences in terms of the processes that produce these rocks

  • classify igneous rocks according to their grain size and mineralogical composition

  • recognise the difference between a body fossil and a trace fossil.

    <
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Virtual Maths , Shapes Space and Measure, Theodolite survey formula
Theodolite survey, information, formula, and calculation
Author(s): Leeds Metropolitan University

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3.2 Congruence
Number systems and the rules for combining numbers can be daunting. This unit will help you to understand the detail of rational and real numbers, complex numbers and integers. You will also be introduced to modular arithmetic and the concept of a relation between elements of a set.
Author(s): The Open University

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4.2 Crinoids

Figure 7 shows the fossilised remains of a type of echinoderm called a crinoid ('cry-noyed'). Although crinoids occur today, they were far more common in the Palaeozoic and Mesozoic Eras. Most crinoids feed by bending their umbrella-like arrangement of flexible appendages (called 'arms') downstream so as to catch a current, rather as in an umbrella being caught in the wind. Tube feet (multipurpose tentacles) on the arms gather food particles suspended in the water, which are then wafte
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8.022 Physics II: Electricity and Magnetism (MIT)
Parallel to 8.02: Physics II, but more advanced mathematically. Some knowledge of vector calculus assumed. Maxwell's equations, in both differential and integral form. Electrostatic and magnetic vector potential. Properties of dielectrics and magnetic materials. In addition to the theoretical subject matter, several experiments in electricity and magnetism are performed by the students in the laboratory.
Author(s): Katsavounidis, Erik,Fisher, Peter

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The Star Spangled Banner
A video compilation of some of The Library of Congress' audio and visual treasures related to "The Star-Spangled Banner."
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Advanced Bank Math Game in Montessori
This is a clip on how to learning to play a bank game composition of numbers geared for preschoolers.  The game activity is presented.

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Metal ring round white dwarf solves missing planets puzzle
Dr Boris Gänsicke and Professor Tom Marsh from The University of Warwick's Astronomy and Astrophysics Group within the Department of Physics talk about their recent discovery of a metal rich gas disc around a white dwarf in the Virgo constellation. Length: 16 minutes
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3.5 Bats

There are two more activities in this section that give you more practice in writing. You will see that you are again given an approximate number of words to aim for in your answer. This number is a guide to the level of detail required - you will often find the same thing done in course assessment questions. W
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流域管理のための水文学
This course focuses on the watershed scale hydrology to understand the movement of water through the hydrologic cycle in relation to environmental characteristics of watersheds. The course covers basic principles to hydrology and the mathematical description of underlying hydrologic processes. We also learn specific hydrologic models and their applications. In some sessions we pick up a set of papers and assigned students are required to present the summary of each paper including the objective,
Author(s): TOKYO TECH OCW

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3.A26 Freshman Seminar: The Nature of Engineering (MIT)
Are you interested in investigating how nature engineers itself? How engineers copy the shapes found in nature ("biomimetics")? This Freshman Seminar investigates why similar shapes occur in so many natural things and how physics changes the shape of nature. Why are things in nature shaped the way they are? How do birds fly? Why do bird nests look the way they do? How do woodpeckers peck? Why can't trees grow taller than they are? Why is grass skinny and hollow? What is the wood science behind m
Author(s): Gibson, Lorna

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Managing virtual project teams
Many projects are now ‘virtual’, i.e. some or all of the team are located remotely and may be working in different time zones. The project manager needs all the traditional soft skills, and more. This free course, Managing virtual project teams, looks at knowledge and techniques which underpin team selection and then consider the additional expertise needed to manage teams in a virtual environment.Author(s): Creator not set

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2