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Carlos Eire, Yale University: "A Brusque History of Eternity - Lecture 1: The Birth of Eternity" –
Until fairly recently eternity was no mere abstraction or metaphor in the Christian tradition, but rather the ultimate destination for humankind, a metaphysical conceit with practical implications as inescapable as legal obligations, or taxes, or death. Eternity was an ineffable mystery, to be sure, but of no less value in human interaction than money itself, or crowns and thrones. In our own day, however, eternity seems a purely abstract concept best left in the hands of astrophysicists, a frig
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Carlos Eire, Yale University: "A Brusque History of Eternity - Lecture 1: The Birth of Eternity" –
Until fairly recently eternity was no mere abstraction or metaphor in the Christian tradition, but rather the ultimate destination for humankind, a metaphysical conceit with practical implications as inescapable as legal obligations, or taxes, or death. Eternity was an ineffable mystery, to be sure, but of no less value in human interaction than money itself, or crowns and thrones. In our own day, however, eternity seems a purely abstract concept best left in the hands of astrophysicists, a frig
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Carlos Eire, Yale University: "A Brusque History of Eternity - Lecture 2: Protestantism and the Refo
Until fairly recently eternity was no mere abstraction or metaphor in the Christian tradition, but rather the ultimate destination for humankind, a metaphysical conceit with practical implications as inescapable as legal obligations, or taxes, or death. Eternity was an ineffable mystery, to be sure, but of no less value in human interaction than money itself, or crowns and thrones. In our own day, however, eternity seems a purely abstract concept best left in the hands of astrophysicists, a frig
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Carlos Eire, Yale University: "A Brusque History of Eternity - Lecture 3: From Eternity to Five-Year
Until fairly recently eternity was no mere abstraction or metaphor in the Christian tradition, but rather the ultimate destination for humankind, a metaphysical conceit with practical implications as inescapable as legal obligations, or taxes, or death. Eternity was an ineffable mystery, to be sure, but of no less value in human interaction than money itself, or crowns and thrones. In our own day, however, eternity seems a purely abstract concept best left in the hands of astrophysicists, a frig
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03 - Iterative deletion and the median-voter theorem
We apply the main idea from last time, iterative deletion of dominated strategies, to analyze an election where candidates can choose their policy positions. We then consider how good is this classic model as a description of the real political process, and how we might build on it to improve it. Toward the end of the class, we introduce a new idea to get us beyond iterative deletion. We think about our beliefs about what the other player is going to do, and then ask what is the best strategy fo
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23 - Paradise XXX, XXXI, XXXII, XXXIII
Professor Mazzotta lectures on the final cantos of Paradiso (30-33). The pilgrim's journey through the physical world comes to an end with his ascent into the Empyrean, a heaven of pure light beyond time and space. Beatrice welcomes Dante into the Heavenly Jerusalem, where the elect are assembled in a celestial rose. By describing the Empyrean as both a garden and a city, Dante recalls the poles of his own pilgrimage while dissolving the classical divide between urbs and rus, between civic li
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20 - Paradise XVIII, XIX, XXI, XXII
In this lecture, Professor Mazzotta examines Paradiso 18-19 and 21-22. In Paradiso 18, Dante enters the heaven of Jupiter, where the souls of righteous rulers assume the form of an eagle, the emblem of the Roman Empire. The Eagle's outcry against the wickedness of Christian kings leads Dante to probe the boundaries of divine justice by looking beyond the confines of Christian Europe. By contrasting the political with the moral boundaries that distinguish one culture from another, Dante opens
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05 - Inferno IX, X, XI
In this lecture, Professor Mazzotta discusses Inferno 9-11. An impasse at the entrance to the City of Dis marks Virgil’s first failure in his role as guide (Inferno 9). The invocation of Medusa by the harpies that descend while they wait for divine aid elicits Dante’s first address to the reader. The question of literary mediation, posed in the previous lecture in the context of Inferno 5, is explored further, and the distinction Dante draws between the “allegory of poets” and the “
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01 - Introduction
Professor Mazzotta introduces students to the general scheme and scope of the Divine Comedy and to the life of its author. Various genres to which the poem belongs (romance, epic, vision) are indicated, and special attention is given to its place within the encyclopedic tradition. The poem is then situated historically through an overview of Dante's early poetic and political careers and the circumstances that led to his exile. Professor Mazzotta concludes by discussing the central role Dante
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In depth explanation of the Immune System- Animated
Compares the body to a house or fort in need of military protection. Describes the immune system as soldiers protecting the fort. Shows process and steps and process the body/immune system goes through to protect from the cold virus. Shows the communication between the body and cells to combat illness and may destroy some cells that carry an illness. References how cells can remember a virus to combat it if the body comes into contact with it again.
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Ten Commandments Of The Native American Indian
A basic presentation of these Commandments. Good for any study of the Native Americans by students.
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Lecture 12: The Centenary Lubbock Lecture
Lord Browne of Madingley, President of the Royal Academy of Engineering "On being an engineer". As President of The Royal Academy of Engineering, Lord Browne's prime goal during his five years in office is 'to move engineering towards the centre of society'. In his opinion the words 'engineers design the future' have more resonance today than ever before. Drawing on global experience of the energy business, industry and political life Lord Browne reflected on what being an engineer means in the
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Prescription for Change at the FDA: A View from the Other Washington, Part 2
Professors at the University of Washington ask: Does the Food and Drug Administration need more rigorous reviews and trials before approving drugs and devices? Should the agency change the process for evaluating safety and effectiveness after products hit the market? What are the political and scientific forces that shape the context for FDA decision-making and how can the clinical and public health communities be included in the discussion? This is the second half of a two-part program on this
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17.433 International Relations of East Asia (MIT)
The aim of this lecture course is to introduce and analyze the international relations of East Asia. With four great powers, three nuclear weapons states and two of the world's largest economies, East Asia is one of the most dynamic and consequential regions in world politics. During the Cold War, East Asia witnessed intense competition and conflict between the superpowers and among the states in the region. In the post-Cold War era, the region has been an engine of the global economy while unde
Author(s): Fravel, M. Taylor

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Content within individual OCW courses is (c) by the individual authors unless otherwise noted. MIT OpenCourseWare materials are licensed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology under a Creative C

Site Epiphys
Epiphys est un espace d'apprentissage numérique transdisciplinaire pour comprendre et apprendre à manipuler des objets mathématiques en s'appuyant sur leurs interprétations en Sciences Physiques. Les connaissances sont organisées en un réseau de concepts parcourus au travers de six types d'articles : observer, analyser, synthétiser, transposer, calculer, pratiquer. Les contenus sont basés sur le questionnement et la mise en situation invitant le visiteur à renforcer sa compréhension du
Author(s): Michel Pavageau

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Cette ressource peut être utilisée librement dans les limites de la licence Creative Commons Paternité - Partage des conditions Initiales à l'identique 2.0 France http://creativecommons.org/licens

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Caplan on the Myth of the Rational Voter
Bryan Caplan, of George Mason University and blogger at EconLog, talks about his book, The Myth of the Rational Voter: Why Democracies Choose Bad Policies. Caplan argues that democracies work well in giving voters what they want but unfortunately, what voters want isn't particularly wise, especially when it comes to economic policy. He outlines a series of systematic biases we often have on economic topics and explains why we have little or no incentive to improve our understanding of the world
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Brady on Health Care Reform, Public Opinion, and Party Politics
David Brady of Stanford University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about American public opinion on changing the health care system. Brady discusses the impact of taxation on public opinion toward health care reform--if the poll includes a measure of the likely increase in taxes necessary to pay for expanding coverage, support for expanding coverage drops dramatically compared to generic polls that ignore costs. He also discusses the role of the party system and partisanship for the health
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Israel and the Middle Eastern Mud - Part 1
Point of View Seminars on International Conflict February 12, 2008 Ian S. Lustick, Bess W. Heyman Chair in Political Science at the University of Pennsylvania POV Seminar Series hosted by Nadim Rouhana, ICAR Faculty
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Traducción para el turismo y el ocio I y II (2015)
Traducción para el Turismo y el Ocio I está concebida como una primera toma de contacto con el mundo de la traducción de textos turísticos. Con esta asignatura se pretende que los alumnos conozcan las características de los textos turísticos y los principales géneros discusivos, y adquieran los conocimientos necesarios para enfrentarse a los retos que presenta la traducción de textos turísticos de nivel intermedio. Asimismo, se espera que los alumnos aprendan a realizar una labor de doc
Author(s): Purificación Meseguer Cutillas

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