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3.6.2 Making learning posters

You may find that, rather than reducing notes to small summary cards, you prefer to produce large posters detailing key points on particular topics. Use pattern, colour, diagrams and drawings in your posters, and display them in parts of your home where you might have an opportunity to gaze at them for some time and absorb the information. One student we know put them around the bathroom! If you have a strong visual memory, then lively posters really help the remembering process.


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7.2 Learning from feedback

This is actually quite a difficult thing for any student to do. It is most effective when your assignment is returned, but by then you may have moved on to the next part of the course. Even so, you do need to make time to re-visit your assignment when it is returned and take note of your tutor's comments. It is the one time when your tutor is able to give feedback and advice to you as an individual student so it is well worth taking time to really absorb their comments. Try to separate
Author(s): The Open University

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4.1 Preparing

In the preparation phase you should pause before starting a new section of work and think about it as a whole. What needs to be covered? What are the various components of this block of work? What are the learning objectives or outcomes? What will you need to know and be able to do at the end of it? What is required in the assignment?

There are two main activities during this phase, both directly related to your course work and assignment:

  • analysing
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2.5 Poor environment

Were you held back at all in your reading by the environment you were reading in? Were you reading in bed, in the bath, sitting at a desk, on the bus, or in the park? Any of these could be a good time and place, but did it actually work for you?

Were you able to maintain your concentration fo
Author(s): The Open University

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References

de Bono, E. (1999) de Bono's Thinking Course. London, BBC Books
Entwistle, N. (1994) quoted in Supporting Open Learners Reader (1996) Milton Keynes, The Open University
Holmes, O. W. quoted in Robbins, A. (1991) Awaken the giant within. New York, Simon & Schuster
Rice, M. (1999) Observer Magazine, 7 November
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7.2 Other ways of structuring thought

Distinguishing between generals and particulars can help you in reading, note taking and writing for your course. But, looking at things in a hierarchical general-particular way is only one approach to giving structure to ideas and information.

Activity 14

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5.2 What have I learned about my knowledge?

It is worth spending some time thinking back over what you have learned from the unit materials. The text and video have presented you with some challenging ideas and a wide range of perspectives. You have been asked to apply this to your own learning for change. As you look back over these, and at your responses to the activities, you will be reminded of the ground you have covered.

It may be helpful to think briefly about the perspectives that were the focus of each section:


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5.1 Introduction

You have almost reached the end of Learning to change and we hope that you will continue to use learning to achieve change in your life. This section is an opportunity to reflect on what you have learned as a result of doing the unit. ‘Reflecting backwards’ is an important part of learning because it helps you to be clear about what you have learned. Looking back also enables you to hold on to what you have learned after the unit finishes. This means that you can ‘reflect
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4.7 Conclusion

We return to what we said at the beginning of this section by reminding you that the action plan is not something that is set in stone, but something that you can return to again and again; revising your goals, or the way you might reach them, in response to the learning you acquire in the process of ticking off the steps you have worked through. As we learn, we change, and as we change, our priorities may also change.

This does not mean that it is not worthwhile drawing up a plan. Havi
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4.5.6 Thinking about personal qualities

Some people are much more open than others to making the changes in their life that lead to (or result from) learning and personal growth. Sometimes, it may feel easier to stay within our comfort zone, even though we are not satisfied with our life, than to venture out into new territory. Fiona Harrold suggests that we have to:

… get used to feeling comfortable with a little discomfort and a little uncertainty alongside a great
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4.5.3 Formal routes to learning

Here we are thinking both of educational institutions (schools, colleges and universities) and work-based learning, such as National Vocational Qualifications (which accredit learning on the job), apprenticeships, and secondments which allow for rehearsal of old skills in new areas, or the development of new skills to take back to the old setting.

Hand-in-hand with the emphasis on lifelong learning, there has been a growth in flexibility and in the idea of personalised learning. It is n
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4.4.6 Agreed

You are more likely to achieve your goal if you have people on your side. If you want to make a change at work, for example, it makes sense to consult your manager about the wording. If you want to make changes in your personal life, you may need to discuss this with family and friends.


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4.4.4 Specific

You need to be quite clear what you are setting out to do. If you are not clear, your goal may be open to different interpretations and you may become unsure of what you intended. For example, suppose you chose a goal like ‘to get better at giving people feedback’. This could be interpreted in at least two ways:

  1. To improve your self-confidence about giving feedback, so that you no longer get nervous about having to do i
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4.2.1 Theories of globalisation

There are many different theories relating to globalisation. Some see globalisation as positive or beneficial. These theories argue that globalisation will encourage ‘good things’ like the growth of online communities that can span the world and might be able to break free of repressive regimes. Others suggest that there will be negative consequences to globalisation. They argue that globalisation makes it easier for jobs to be exported to wherever labour is cheapest. In this view there a
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4.1 Introduction

In Sections 2 and 3 you have been thinking about the past and the present. You have gathered evidence about your current knowledge, skills and personal qualities. You have also explored the value of other perspectives on your learning. These perspectives have included the views of other people and the ideas in some academic theories. This section continues the exploration of academic ideas. In particular, it picks up on the issue that was first raised in Section 3 in relation to the theories
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3.4 Preparing to move on – connecting theory with skills

This section has been encouraging you to think about using two additional sources to help you prepare for change. The first of these sources has been other people that you know. The second has been a selection of ‘academic’ theory that can be linked to learning. We hope that this has added to your knowledge and understanding of your own learning.

In this next section, the focus shifts to gauging how your work with these two sources has used and (we hope) developed a number of your s
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3.3.6 A ‘health warning’ about groups

It can be great to belong to a group, especially if you are a highly respected ‘core’ member. Other people can look up to you and ask you to share your expertise. The process of moving from being a peripheral member to being a core member can also be very satisfying. However, groups are sometimes defined as much by whom they exclude. Groups may not just have ‘insiders’; they have ‘outsiders’ who are not seen as part of the group. Often this may not matter much. No one can be a mem
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3.3.2 What problems might you have with this?

One way to think about the problems you might have with using academic theory on Learning to change is to think about the difference between getting personal feedback and using academic ideas. Academic theory about learning is unlikely to have considered your particular experiences or the story of your life. This may mean that some parts of theory may not seem to apply to you. Often theory is found written down in books or journal articles which are read by other academics; they
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3.3 Your learning – what does ‘theory’ offer?

The previous section of this section focused on using feedback to enhance what you already know about your qualities, knowledge and skills. This section explores how you might draw on theory in the same way. However, it can be very difficult to include theory with other sorts of understanding.

Let’s start by thinking about why it might be useful to pay some attention to what theories about learning have to say. This leads on to a brief discussion about the difficulties that can arise
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3.2.2 What problems might you have with getting feedback?

Only you can answer this. However, you might think that you will not find it easy to ask someone else to be a mentor and give you feedback about your own qualities, knowledge or skills. There may be all sorts of reasons for this. You might not feel that you know anyone that you would trust to give you feedback in a way in which you would find helpful. Acting as a feedback giver can put someone in such a powerful position that you might feel uncomfortable. You might feel that you do not know a
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