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1.9 Models of health care delivery: alternative or holistic models

Many CAM modalities have grown from a wide range of concepts of the body and health and healing that differ from the models discussed so far. As Fulder notes:

The body, in Chinese medicine, is energetic. In yoga and healing, the body is spiritual. In modern (conventional) medicine, the body is physicochemical. In homeopathy, it is phenomenological. In naturopathy it is vital, etc. All of these conceptions do not necess
Author(s): The Open University

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1.6.3 Mailing lists and newsgroups

Mailing or discussion lists are email-based discussion groups. When you send an email to a mailing list address, it is sent automatically to all the other members of the list.

The majority of academic-related mailing lists in the UK are maintained by JISCMail. You will find details of joining these mailing lists on the JISCMail website. Mailing lists
Author(s): The Open University

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1.4.8 Summary

In this section we have introduced you to the PROMPT checklist as a useful tool for assessing the quality of any piece of information. If you use it regularly you will find that you develop the ability to scan information quickly and identify strengths and weaknesses. As a closing exercise you might like to pick one of these websites:

Diagnose-Me.com

Author(s): The Open University

1.3.4 Databases

At a basic level, a database is a collection of information which can be searched. It is a way of storing, indexing, organising and retrieving information. You may have created one yourself to keep track of your references – or your friends' names and addresses. They are useful for finding articles on a topic, and can be used to search for many different types of information.

You may find some of the following databases useful for your topic. They contain different types of informatio
Author(s): The Open University

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1.2.3 Basic principles

Whatever resource you choose to use to find information on the internet, many of the same principles apply. Each source that you use will probably look quite different from the one you tried before, but you'll notice that there are always features that are similar – a box to type your search terms in, for instance, or a clickable help button. Different resources refer to the same functions using different terminology, but the principles behind them are exactly the same. The trick is to chec
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1.1.6 Keeping up-to-date

How familiar are you with the following different ways of keeping up to date with information; alerts, mailing lists, newsgroups, blogs, RSS, professional bodies and societies?

  • 5 – Very familiar

  • 4 – Familiar

  • 3 – Fairly familiar

  • 2 – Not very familiar

  • 1 – Not familiar at all


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1.1.4 Evaluating information

How well does the following statement describe your approach to evaluating the information that you use?

When I come across a new piece of information (e.g. a website, newspaper article) I consider the quality of the information, and based on that I decide whether or not to use it.

  • 5 – This is an excellent match; this is exactly what I do


    Author(s): The Open University

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3.1 Social work values and legal values

Social work practice is founded on and informed by a value base; however, this value base is uncertain and changing (Shardlow, 1998). It is important that practitioners are able to reflect on their values and prejudices and consider the implications of these for practice. The next activity requires you to think about this before going on to look in more detail at what is meant by social work values.

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1.5 Accountability

Social workers have to act within the law and can be called upon to justify their actions to courts and managers as well as to service users. The law can define a worker's accountability in some detail. Furthermore, service users have a right to complain. Social workers are also employees and thus can be called upon to justify their actions to their line management and agency; this will be outlined by their agency requirements.


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Understanding children: Babies being heard
Here you will find out some of the things very young babies can do. You will also discover how babies can contribute to family life and relationships from birth. You will look at what they need from other adults and children, and what they can learn. First published on Wed, 04 Jan 2012 as Author(s): Creator not set

Understanding society: Families
Here you will explore how different families have different ideas about how work in the home should be divided. You will also investigate the diversity of families. We will see how any discussion of the division of labour has to recognise that families differ in terms of shape and size. First published on Fri, 06 Jan 2012 as Author(s): Creator not set

Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.

Every effort has bee
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2.3 Why we value play

Play is notoriously difficult to define, but this in itself is not problematic. What is important is that practitioners, parents and children within a setting share their ideas about what constitutes play and that we, as adults, are clear about why we value play. In order to do this, you need to take a step back and think about what you think play does and, from there, consider why it is valuable.

In Author(s): The Open University

7 Different babies, different families

In the first part of the unit we learned that babies can do more than adults think, despite having not been in the world for long. We then looked at how adults and older children can help babies learn and develop. What the extracts have shown is that:

  • babies’ temperament

  • how they experience the world

  • how they behave towards other humans and

  • how humans behave towards them

all matter, and tha
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3.1 Choice of placements

Activity 3: Where are children ‘looked after’?

0 hours 20 minutes

Introduction

This unit is from our archive and it is an adapted extract from Working with children and families (K204) which is no longer in presentation. If you wish to study formally at The Open University, you may wish to explore the courses we offer in this subject area.

You are probably aware that most children live with a parent or parents, with siblings and relatives and
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2.1 Introduction

In the unit overview we explored some of the images and discourses about young people's health currently in circulation. But what assumptions are being made in these stories about what it means for a young person to be healthy, whether physically or mentally? What kind of model of wellbeing is being used in these discourses, and are there alternative approaches?


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2 What is brain-based learning and teaching?

Neuroscientists now have more sophisticated ways of examining living brains than was ever possible before. It is now possible to obtain images of the brain that show activity as it occurs. The importance of the first years of life has always been recognised by early years practitioners but the new information about the brain deepens our understanding about why this might be.

Perry and Pollard (1997) reported on the effects of sensory stimulation, or the lack of it, on early brain develo
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • acquire and critically apply the research, analytical and evaluative skills needed for effective practice and the promotion of equality across universal and specialist services for children;

  • develop a skilled, dynamic and ethical approach to working with children;

  • understand and analyse the contributions of different approaches to the study of children, childhood and families, and recognise the potenti
    Author(s): The Open University

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Ping 161: Scroogled, Xbox sales, Windows Store wins, IE 10 trolls | Ping!

Laura and Paul bring you all the top stories- but it's YOU we want to hear from! Check out the latest episode and then jump in on the conversation...don't be shy, we like you, promise. Here are some convo kick starters:

Scroogled!  [05:22]

Author(s): Laura Foy

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