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Activity 1

Click on 'View document' below to open and read part of Audrey Linkman's article on 'Photography and art theory', then answer the questions.


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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • explain the relationship between research on national cultures and the development of the culture perspective in business studies;

  • describe some of the problems of working in, and doing business with, businesses in other countries;

  • offer a definition of organisational culture;

  • recognise the factors that constitute or influence the culture of a business.

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Introduction

Culture is just one perspective that can help us to understand more about a business. 'Business culture' is not just about how others see a business, but also about how the individuals within an organisation understand it. In this unit we explore how the concept of culture developed from research into differences between cultures at a national level. It is possible to see, or ‘feel’, that one business is different from another, and that this involves more than just how it presents it
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.

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Form vs. Function
Students model and design the sound environment for a room. They analyze the sound performance of different materials that symbolize wallpaper, thick curtains, and sound-absorbing panels. Referring to the results of this analysis, they then design another room based on certain specifications and test their design.
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Snakes Go to Great Lengths to Fool Predators-Find Out How!
Watch how a none poisonous snake use its tongue to trick predators, and a double headed snake having the same features of its tail as its head(Running Time 2:00).                
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions). This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

All materials included in this unit are derived from content originated at the Open University.


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Studying changing faces in the solar system
In this middle-school level activity, students work as NASA scientists to make repeated observations of our Sun and the planets to determine their rotation rates. First, students create a playground model of rotation and create representative diagrams. Students then observe NASA images of sunspots to determine the rotation rate of our Sun. In the last phase, students download NASA movies from the Internet and measure rotation rates for objects in the solar system.
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IITA Video
Four examples of International Institute of Tropical Agriculture's (IITA) programs for developing agriculture in Africa.
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HUTCHINSON-GILFORD SYNDROME
Recent studies suggest that, as in other aging syndromes, the Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome is due to a defect in the mechanism of DNA repair. Mutations have been found in the Lamin A gene (LMNA) situated on chromosome 1.
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How Much Water Do We Use?
What is our water budget? Studying watersheds is one way to understand how much water we use.
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should be able to:

  • evaluate technical descriptions of communication protocols and demonstrate your understanding of their operation;

  • describe the characteristics of circuit-switched and packet-switched networks, and of connectionless and connection-oriented modes in packet-switched networks;

  • describe the role played by primitives in the OSI reference model;

  • explain how ‘vertical’ and ‘hori
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Introduction

People have always communicated with each other – initially by face-to-face communication through gestures and sounds, then over a distance through written messages and signals in the form of fires, lights or flags. Technology, for instance in the form of electrical signals, has reduced many of the limitations of distance. Communication networks have become very important, and modern society depends on them for the smooth operation of economic and social activities. In this unit we regard a
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Special Restrictions: Teach Global courses are governed by the Teach Global site Terms and Conditions. Please ensure you read
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Science and Religion on the Radio
Mr Martin Redfern : Course
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Learning outcomes

After studying this unit you should:

  • be able to explain what is meant by the term ‘the global dimension’;

  • be familiar with the terminology used in relation to the global dimension;

  • know why the inclusion of the global dimension in the primary school curriculum is important;

  • know how the global dimension can enhance the primary school curriculum;

  • be able to plan the global dimension into the secondary curriculum
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Introduction

This unit provides access to Teach Global, where you will find a set of courses and resources aimed at supporting teachers who wish to extend their teaching of the global dimension through all aspects of school life.

Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

Illustration by E
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2.2 Profile of teaching assistants: an overview

Traditionally the primary education sector has employed a high proportion of women teachers. In England and Wales in 1980, male teachers constituted around 23 per cent and female teachers 77 per cent of the workforce (DES, 1980). By 1999 the number of men had decreased to 17 per cent and that of women had increased to 83 per cent (DfES, 2002). There is reason to think that this trend is continuing. Primary teaching is certainly a ‘feminised’ workforce, but there are also anomalies re
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1 The rise of the paraprofessional


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