Money talks: Clutching at straws
This week we discuss whether policy-makers are out of ammunition to fight global financial jitters, pondering efforts to prop up oil prices and signs that central banks will ease monetary policy further
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Elephant rides CC97_00710

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Zoological Gardens, Regents Park, London. Stereoscopic view showing members of the public mounting an elephant for a ride. Photographed by York & Son, 1870-1900.
© Historic England


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4.2.1 Quantifying thermal energy

Thermal energy is associated with random motion – that is, in effect, a definition. Because it is random, it only makes sense to talk about it in connection with a large population of atoms. I began with fifty million million million silicon atoms – that should be enough. If whatever motion they have is random, some may have lots of it, others very little. With such a large population it is reasonable to try to think about an average motion or, better, to define an average energy of the p
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1.9 Community and identity

In an Italian exhibition of cartoons on the theme of globalization (reported in the Financial Times (Lloyd, 2000)), one depicted two women sitting on a couch. The first woman explains enthusiastically ‘Thanks to globalisation, we know immediately what's happening all over the planet!’; the other, crying, says ‘I just want the gossip from next door!’ This was interpreted as a longing for a previous era of emotionally and physically closer communities. The reality of such ‘good
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3.3 The projective plane

We now consider one of the most important non-orientable surfaces – the projective plane (sometimes called the real projective plane). In Section 2 we introduced it as the surface obtained from a rectangle by identifying each pair of opposite edges in opposite directions, as shown in Author(s): The Open University

3.2 (2B): Developing a relational model of the Powerdown Show programme

In this activity you will be challenged to reinterpret the following programme extracted from the Powerdown Show DVD: Energy Descent Pathways. The reason this programme was selected, from the many audio-visual programmes currently available online that tackle environmental and social issues, was because it presents an "ecotopian" approach to tackling the converging social, econ
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5.4 The 5 Ds

If you don't use a system at all, then you could suffer from the effects of information overload:

  • losing important information

  • wasting time on trying to find things

  • ending up with piles of physical and virtual stuff everywhere

One technique you might like to apply to your files (be they paper or electronic) is the 5Ds. Try applying these and see if you can reduce your information overload.

The 5 Ds
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1.2.6 Learning new computing skills

There are several principles for learning new computing skills:

  • Don't be afraid to try things out and explore. You almost certainly won't do any harm by making mistakes – modern software will usually let you undo errors, and will warn you before performing potentially damaging actions.

  • Look for patterns. Find the differences and similarities between the ways in which things are done in different software, so you can begin to guess what
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1.9.2 To sum up

Such an analysis reinforces the notion of discourse as a form of work or labour. It also implies a strategic speaker. But, again, is this the case? Are speakers strategic in this way or just doing what comes naturally? It can suggest, too, a duplicity in Diana's actions. Potter is not implying this, however. Rather, as knowledgeable speakers and competent members of discursive communities, we are all, like Diana, skilled in a range of methods for accomplishing different activities such as sta
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Derived copy of The Small and Large Intestines
Stephanie Fretham
By the end of this section, you will be able to: Compare and contrast the location and gross anatomy of the small and large intestines Identify three main adaptations of […]

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A Conversation with Meg Munn
A conversation with Meg Munn MP, former Minister in the Blair and Brown governments. Hear an 'insider's' take on the UK political scene - a crucial general election due within six months, the 'expenses scandal' entangling Westminster MPs, an unpopular Labour leader, and the UK’s relationship with Europe being questioned again. Held 7 December, 2009.
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand methods of introducing film music to secondary school pupils

  • understand how the concept of music accompanying image can be applied to skills of composition

  • understand how to develop techniques of appraising and analysing film music through classroom activities.


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1.12.2 Constructing discursive spaces

Finally, the notion of discursive space draws attention to the broader social practices which construct such spaces. Thus social scientists and discourse researchers have been interested in the practices of production of newspapers and the media and in the ways in which economic and technological developments construct discursive spaces. E-mail, the internet and computer-mediated communication are good examples of how changing practices produce new spaces which construct new kinds of discursi
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Chelsea Barracks AA60_01116

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Chelsea Barracks, Chelsea Bridge Road, London. The barracks of 1861-63 from the south, photographed by Herbert Felton in 1960. These buildings were demolished circa 1960-61, shortly after this photograph was taken.
© Historic England


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The Early Years Transition and Special Educational Needs (EYTSEN) Project: Technical Paper 1 - Speci
The Early Years Transitions and Special Educational Needs (EYTSEN) project builds on the work of the Effective Provision of Pre-School Education (EPPE) project, a major longitudinal study of a national sample of young children’s progress and development through pre-school and into primary school until the end of Key Stage 1 (age 3+ to 7 years) (Sylva et al., 1999). Both the EPPE and EYTSEN research studies are funded by the DfES. The EYTSEN study explores evidence of possible special educatio
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The Effective Provision of Pre-School Education (EPPE) Project: Technical Paper 5 - Characteristics
This paper reports on interviews conducted with the managers of the EPPE pre-school centres. This interview was designed to provide information likely to help differentiate effectiveness in pre-school settings by contextualising information from observational profiles (reported in Technical Paper 6 in this series), other interviews with centre managers (reported in Technical Paper 3) and case studies (reported in Technical Paper 10). The paper reports on wide differences in provision across the
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4.2.2 The significance of the average energy

The average thermal energy of the atoms in a solid indicates how much they are 'rattling' or vibrating around their mean positions. Since the atoms are close together, virtually touching, and because atoms are almost incompressible, they cannot get much closer. But they can get further apart. So, since thermal energy is manifested in the vibrations of the atoms, bigger vibrations mean that the atoms must spend more time further apart. On average then, there is a tendency for a solid to expand
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Chemical Free Moisturizers For Men

Video link (see supported sites below). Please use the original link, not the shortcut, e.g. www.youtube.com/watch?v=abcde

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Money talks: Is the anger over trade justified?
Soumaya Keynes speaks to leading economist Richard Baldwin about how to mitigate globalisation's destructive effects. Also on the show: South Africa’s debt rating is just one notch above junk. How might the country bounce back? And why golf is no longer cool in Japan. Simon Long hosts
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2.1 The importance of sine waves

For much of the rest of this unit we shall be concerned with the properties of a type of sound wave that when represented as a graph has a characteristic shape known as a sine wave. Figure 1 shows you what a sine-wave graph looks like. For the moment you need not be concerned with what this grap
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