2.3 Appreciating epistemological issues

Common sense tells me my experience and understanding of the world are limited. I am 173 cm in height. That limits my view of the world. It may not matter much that I cannot see what my house looks like from above but it does mean there will be things going on in the roof I may not notice until they impinge on areas that I can experience.

More significantly, there is a real limitation on understanding the experiences of other people. You might tell me about your experience but your desc
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2 Part 1 Starting the unit

Welcome to T306_2 Managing complexity: a systems approach – introduction. As I write, I experience a sense of excitement. For me, as for you, this is the beginning of the unit. These are the first few sentences I'm writing and so, although I have a good idea of how the unit is going to turn out, the details are by no means clear. Nevertheless, the excitement and anticipation I, and maybe you, are experiencing now is an important ingredient in what will become our experiences of the u
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Conclusion

This free course, Systems diagramming, provided an introduction to studying Computing & IT. It took you through a series of exercises designed to develop your approach to study and learning at a distance, and helped to improve your confidence as an independent learner.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 1 study in Author(s): The Open University

5.1 Relativising the Holocaust?

Relativising the Holocaust has been one of the classic techniques of some of those engaged in Holocaust denial; they have sought to minimise Nazi atrocities by listing them alongside the British concentration camps of the Boer War, the terror bombing of German cities during World War II and, perhaps most effectively, the purges and Gulags of the Soviet Union under Stalin. When, during the 1980s, the eminent German historian Ernst Nolte suggested that the Third Reich was a symbiotic product of
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1 The problem with crime: Glasgow

Sean Damer examines the problem of crime in relation to Glasgow. The audio programme was recorded in 2001.

Participants in the audio programme were:

  • Sean Damer Staff Tutor in Politics for The Open University, Scotland and is based in the University of Glasgow;

  • Moira Burgess a pre-eminent bibliographer of Glasgow and analyst of Glasgow in fiction;

  • Jimmy Boyle a graduate of Barlinnie Prison's
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1.2.3 Working with percentages

Table 1 used percentages, rather than actual numbers, to compare the number of people using the internet for each purpose. Numbers are expressed as if they are 'out of a hundred' when using percentages, which makes it easier to compare different values. You can recognise percentages by the % symbol which you can see at the top of the right-hand column of Table 1.

As you can see from halfway down the table, 50% of the people who had used the internet in the previous 3 months used it for
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1.1.6 Multiple operations

Sometimes you may wish to perform several operations in one step (for example: 35 / 10−3).

When you enter a number of operations one after the other, before clicking the '=key', the Windows calculator will evaluate the combination of operations in a particular order. This corresponds to the order used for any calculation that involves several arithmetic operations. Multiplication and division are evaluated first, then addition and subtraction.

In the example given above, this wo
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5.1.6 Languages and Law

Your course will recommend appropriate dictionaries, grammars and reference books.


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4 Conclusion

Finally, a few key messages to take from this course. One is that there is no great mystery about what good writing is. We can recognize it just by reading it. The difficulty is how to produce it. However, since there are different aspects of writing well, you will find it useful to return to the ‘Criteria of good essay wri
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3.2 Answering the question

An essay can be good in almost every other way and yet be judged poor because it ignores the question in the title. Strictly speaking, I should say ‘it ignores the issues presented in the title’ because not every essay title actually contains a question. But, in fact, there is usually a central question underlying an essay title, even when it takes the form of a quotation from a text followed by the instruction ‘Discuss’. And you need to work out what that underlying question is, beca
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1.2 What is an essay?

The different arts and humanities subjects make their own particular demands on you. You may have to do various kinds of writing – diaries, logs, project reports, case-studies – or even write creatively. In this chapter, though, we are going to concentrate on the essay because that is by far the most common form of writing in arts and humanities subjects.

The word ‘essay’ originally meant ‘an attempt’ or try at something, but now it usually means a short piece of writing on
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1.2.4 Personal distress

Another way of defining psychological ‘abnormality’ is to ask whether certain behaviours or styles of functioning cause distress to the individual concerned. Think about your response to what you consider to be ‘normal’ alcohol consumption. Perhaps you specified a maximum number of units per day or week? If so, why did you do this? Is it because of the health problems associated with excessive drinking, or because of its association with antisocial behaviour? Some of you may believe t
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • identify and discuss the issues that relate to the definition, explanation and remediation of ‘abnormal’ psychological functioning

  • understand the complexities involved in identifying, explaining and managing dyslexia.


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1.5 Moving forward?

So far you have read about the development of consultation with service users. Why, then, do service users and their organisations experience a struggle to be heard? What barriers are they encountering?

Service providers may structure consultation around service needs rather than service users' interests. For example, consultation at the planning, delivery and monitoring stages of a new day centre might be informative to service providers as well as a good example of service user involv
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Acknowledgements
What does ‘attention’ mean to you? This unit will help you to examine how we ‘pay attention’. How do we manage to single out sounds and images that require attention and how easy is it to distract someone and why?
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References
What does ‘attention’ mean to you? This unit will help you to examine how we ‘pay attention’. How do we manage to single out sounds and images that require attention and how easy is it to distract someone and why?
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Further reading
What does ‘attention’ mean to you? This unit will help you to examine how we ‘pay attention’. How do we manage to single out sounds and images that require attention and how easy is it to distract someone and why?
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6 Concluding thoughts
What does ‘attention’ mean to you? This unit will help you to examine how we ‘pay attention’. How do we manage to single out sounds and images that require attention and how easy is it to distract someone and why?
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5.4 Summary of Section 5
What does ‘attention’ mean to you? This unit will help you to examine how we ‘pay attention’. How do we manage to single out sounds and images that require attention and how easy is it to distract someone and why?
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5.3 Event-related potentials
What does ‘attention’ mean to you? This unit will help you to examine how we ‘pay attention’. How do we manage to single out sounds and images that require attention and how easy is it to distract someone and why?
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