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2 Contribution and roles

Hilary Cremin et al. (2003), in their evaluation of the ways in which teachers and teaching assistants can work together in teams, suggest that, while there is enthusiasm for additional support, little attention is given to how this actually works in classrooms. It is true that learning support staff have been introduced into classrooms without clear research evidence that they can make a difference to children’s learning, but then life often moves faster than the supply of research evidenc
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Conclusion

In this course, the issues that arise in bringing a project to a close have been examined, and ways of evaluating a project have been discussed. The key components of project closure have been identified and discussed and their importance in ensuring that the aims and objectives of a project have been successfully attained, have been explored. You should now be able to plan an effective project closure. Problems often need to be resolved at the closure stage, and those managing projects need
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3.1 Codes of conduct

One of the principles of the European Union Emissions Trading System discussed by Schultz and Williamson (2005) is that an organisation accepts responsibility for the performance of their suppliers. In an age where multinational corporations are able to reduce the production costs of their goods and services by offshoring it to whoever can meet the specification at the lowest cost, what responsibility do they have for the conditions under which production actually occurs?

One of the fir
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2.2 Regulatory initiatives

Box 2 Political will

‘We know the solution: sustainable development. The issue is political will.’

Prime Minister Tony Blair, World Summit on Sustainable Development, Johannesburg, 2 September 2002


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1.1 Globalisation

Globalisation is something we tend to take for granted, mostly in the form of the remarkably low prices we pay for our consumer goods. When the first pocket calculator was launched in the UK in 1972, it cost £79 plus tax, an amount close to the average monthly take home pay.

Ten years later came the original IBM PC. Replete with a 4.77 MHz processor, 64kB RAM, a 12″ monochrome monitor (and an optional floppy disk drive!), it carried a UK price tag in excess of £1500, at that time a
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • understand the need for organisations to acknowledge the influence of their environments

  • understand the impact organisations have on those environments.


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Keep on learning

Study another free course

There are more than 800 courses on OpenLearn for you to
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Project debriefing

Individual interviews with key members of the project team, for example the managers of key stages, can encourage them to evaluate their performance and identify what they have learned. A structured debriefing process can be helpful, to include stakeholders as well as all the project team. This may take the form of a series of meetings, which draw conclusions about overall project performance and constraints, identify and review any new ways of working that were developed, and consider what c
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Learning outcomes

After studying this course, you should be able to:

  • explain the key components of project closure and their importance

  • plan an effective project closure

  • ensure that the project activities have been completed

  • recognise problems that may need to be resolved at the closure stage

  • contribute to evaluating a project.


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References

Frame, J.D. (1987) Managing Projects in Organizations: How to Make the Best Use of Time, Techniques and People, San Francisco, Jossey Bass.
Buzan, T. (1982) Use Your Head, London, Ariel Books.

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8 A basis for action and the project brief

Once the initial discussions about the purpose and feasibility of the project have confirmed that the project is worth carrying out, it is essential to establish the basic agreement as a document. The document will provide the reference point for all future work on the project and will be the basis for all judgements about whether the project is finally successful or not. This document is sometimes called the terms of reference, but usually incorporates some additional information in the form
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7.1 Consider the purpose

A project that meets an important need for your organisation will contribute towards meeting wider organisational targets. Consider the purpose – what will the project contribute that will further the goals of the organisation? It is often useful to discuss this with the project sponsor and to align the project objectives with the strategic objectives of the organisation. If the ‘fit’ of the project with the organisational direction is considered at an early stage, it might be possible
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1.1 A definition

One definition is

‘A project is a one-off, non-repeated activity or set of tasks which achieves clearly stated objectives within a time limit.’

Most managers work on projects, often small or short-term projects, rather than large ones that take several years to complete. Size or length of time do not indicate that one project is more important than another – often small projects pave
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Introduction

This course looks at the way people identify and become attached to places, buildings and objects. It also analyses how this attachment can impact on personal well-being. Understanding this is important in assessing the care people of all ages need and how this care should be delivered.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 1 study in Author(s): The Open University

Introduction

This course is made up of four extracts related to social care, social work and the law. The extracts are stand-alone sections but follow on from each other to make up this course. You will be introduced to five main themes that shape practice in the field of social care and social work. The aim of this course is to enhance your understanding of the relationship between social work practice and the law.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 2 study in Author(s): The Open University

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Social work learning practice
This free audio course, Social work learning practice, focuses on the importance of people's backgrounds and experiences in the field of social work. It identifies the diverse ways in which service users and social workers define themselves, helping you to understand how the two groups perceive each other and relate successfully to each other. An understanding of how people make sense of their experiences will help you to define yourself, and your own place within the process. Author(s): Creator not set

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Introduction

In this course, we are going to look at a number of situations which put a strain on the idea that caring is just 'being ordinary', including times when people are giving intimate care. In these special circumstances, since the normal rules do not apply, we have to develop a set of special rules to guide practice.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of Level 1 study in Author(s): The Open University

7.4 Identity in question

Why is identity important and how are identities formed? This course looks at the many different ways in which identity can be categorised. By examining the requirements of the state, how a child views gender, and the importance of race or place of birth, you will start to understand how each individual can have more than one identity. This course focuses upon the individual's perception of self in relation to others; the relationships between multi-ethnicity, cultural diversity and identity;
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6.1 Overview

These courses will introduce you to the Scottish legal system. Scots law today represents centuries of development and growth. Its evolution has been influenced by many factors, social and economic, the effects of war and religious change, political and governmental changes, alliances with overseas powers such as France, and Union with England. Since 1999, the new Scottish Parliament has had its own law-making powers.

The first course in this section provides a taster for a new course o
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