School of Life Sciences
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Federico Dajas-Bailador

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

BSc. (Universidad de la Republica, Uruguay).

PhD. (University of Bath, UK).

Post-doctoral work (University of Manchester, UK).

Research Summary

The capacity of neurons to polarize by developing a long axon and multiple dendrites defines their function and underlies the flow of information in the nervous system. In essence, the formation and… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

The capacity of neurons to polarize by developing a long axon and multiple dendrites defines their function and underlies the flow of information in the nervous system. In essence, the formation and growth of an axon comprise a series of concerted events controlled by intrinsic molecular mechanisms and extracellular cues, which lead to changes in cytoskeleton dynamics. As a whole, the process of neuronal polarization provides not only a model for the understanding of neuron development and brain connectivity, but also for the identification of signalling processes able to promote neuronal survival after injury or disease.

The highly polarized morphology of neurons makes them very sensitive to localized environmental cues, including neurotransmitter release, differential gradients of soluble signals and changes in the extracellular matrix. For this reason, the different physiology and function of somata, axons and dendrites need to be addressed in conditions that allow for micro-environmental control. The manipulation of fluids in channels with dimensions of micrometers (microfluidics) allows bio-analytical studies on axon development, ligand-receptor interactions and the identification of pathophysiological and therapeutic mechanisms. This can be used for studying the molecular and cellular mechanisms that can locally influence axonal plasticity, degeneration and its response to injury.

In brief, work in my lab attempts to address some of the key processes that control axon development by investigating signal integration and the regulation of protein levels in the axonal growth cone. Among other aspects, this encompasses the study of the mechanisms controlling local protein translation by microRNAs and the specific regulation of axonal protein expression by selective degradation.

School of Life Sciences

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Queen's Medical Centre
Nottingham NG7 2UH

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