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Stuart Smith

Clinical Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

Contact

  • workRoom D30 D30, CBTRC, D Floor, Medical School, QMC campus
    Queen's Medical Centre
    Nottingham
    NG7 2UH
    UK
  • work0115 823097

Biography

Neurosurgical training in Bristol and Nottingham, undertaking a PhD under the supervision of Professor R Grundy examining paediatric high grade gliomas. Appointed clinical associate professor in Neurosurgery, working in the Children's Brain Tumour Research Centre and Nottingham University Hospitals.

Expertise Summary

My research has involved a diverse array of techniques including cell culture (2d and 3d); molecular analysis of tumour specimens by immunohistochemistry, rt-PCR, FISH and MRS; bio-informatic analysis; microRNA biology; tumour heterogeneity and drug delivery.

Teaching Summary

Lecturer Graduate Entry Medicince and Cancer Biology courses

PhD supervisor

BMedSci research project supervisor

Research Summary

My current work examines the effects of microRNAs on angiogenesis and tumour growth. Aberrant patterns of microRNA expression are found in malignant brain tumours in children and these are associated… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

My current work examines the effects of microRNAs on angiogenesis and tumour growth. Aberrant patterns of microRNA expression are found in malignant brain tumours in children and these are associated with many key neoplastic features. We seek to characterise and investigate these networks of altered gene regulation and understand how they relate to the aggressive features seen in these cancers. It may be possible to treat these tumours by utilising microRNA biology to alter the expression of a large number of oncogenes.

Our drug delivery work is focusing on efficacy and toxicity studies of chemotherapy loaded PLGA/PEG material, evaluating different drugs and release profiles to optimise combinations for human use.

Future Research

We hope to progress current research to examine further the effects of altered cellular metabolism in high grade glioma brain tumours. These tumours exhibit altered cellular energy metabolism as a key part of their neoplastic nature and this is a key driver of angiogenesis and malignant potential. By targeting these pathways it may be possible to affect a broad range of tumour behaviours, possibly through microRNA control.

We are also moving forward with drug delivery solutions, aiming to commence first in man trials within the next few years of drug loaded PLGA/PEG for adult glioblastoma.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

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