Clinical Epidemiology
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Richard Hubbard

GSK/British Lung Foundation Professor of Respiratory Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

Professor Richard Hubbard studied for his undergraduate degree in Medicine and Immunology at London University, before undertaking clinical postgraduate training at Nottingham. He trained in Epidemiology at London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Expertise Summary

Keywords:

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, drug safety, respiratory epidemiology, interstitial lung disease management, national cancer audits, lung complications of bone marrow transplantation

Teaching Summary

Professor Hubbard currently supervises four PhD students: two researching lung cancer health services, one researching lung fibrosis, and one researching falls. He teaches on the Advanced… read more

Research Summary

Professor Hubbard's current main area of research interest is lung disease, including lung fibrosis and lung cancer. He is also involved in improving general practice data for research, coding free… read more

Selected Publications

  • Thorax Respiratory Journal- Member of the editorial board
  • British Lung Foundation- Scientific Committee Member
  • British Thoracic Society Interstitial Lung Disease Special Advisory Group- Member

Professor Hubbard currently supervises four PhD students: two researching lung cancer health services, one researching lung fibrosis, and one researching falls. He teaches on the Advanced Epidemiology module for the Masters in Public Health/Epidemiology, Clinical Medicine on wards and in clinic. He is also a Advanced Life support (ALS) instructor on an intensive two day course on how to deal with cardiac arrests.

Current Research

Professor Hubbard's current main area of research interest is lung disease, including lung fibrosis and lung cancer. He is also involved in improving general practice data for research, coding free text data. His research aims to find out the following:

What causes lung fibrosis?

This case-control study involves 250 people with lung fibrosis and 250 healthy people to determine whether blood tests, in particular those relating to clotting, increase the risk of developing the disease.

What blood markers predict an adverse outcome in people with lung fibrosis?

This study will be following up a cohort to try and determine what may be associated with a poor prognosis. The results will be used to help design clinical trials.

What trust and patient level factors determine access to surgery and chemotherapy for people with lung cancer?

This involves an analysis of the National Lung Cancer Audit.

Can we diagnose lung cancer earlier?

This study looks at the interaction between GPs and people with lung cancer in the months before the diagnosis is made.

Clinical Epidemiology

The University of Nottingham
School of Medicine

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