INS
Institute for Name-Studies
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Welcome to the INS

The Institute for Name‑Studies (INS) is the home of research into place‑names and personal names at the University of Nottingham.

The English Place‑Name Society (EPNS) is the established national body for the subject; its offices and library are housed in the Institute.

 

stapleford
 

Overview

The INS was established as an umbrella organisation for the research activities of the EPNS and name-studies scholars at the University of Nottingham.

The INS conducts numerous research projects into the origins and meanings of names and place-names, derived from English, Norse, British Celtic, French, and Latin languages. It also provides high-quality resources for both the study and analysis of place-names, which are used by historians, linguists, and geographers alike.

There are many study opportunities relating to the INS for higher education students of all levels
 

Current Research

Travel and Communication in Anglo-Saxon England

The Travel and Communications project is a three-year interdisciplinary research project funded by the Leverhulme Trust investigating travel and communications in Anglo-Saxon England.

The project, a collaborative venture between the Institute of Archaeology at University College London and the Institute for Name-Studies at the University of Nottingham, runs from November 2014 and teams archaeologists, historians, and place-name scholars.  The project team are working to reconstruct Anglo-Saxon England’s overland route-system (and its intersections with the riverine route-system) using textual, landscape archaeological, and onomastic evidence.

Despite its evident importance for understanding several aspects of Anglo-Saxon society, including warfare, commerce and polity formation and extent, the Anglo-Saxon routeway network has not previously been investigated in detail at the national level. There is therefore much that is uncertain about the routeway network during the period.

It has often been assumed that the Roman road network remained in use throughout the Anglo-Saxon period; consequently, travel in Anglo-Saxon England is often discussed in relation to the Roman road network. However, as the majority of the known Roman roads did not survive into use in the early modern period, it is highly likely that some of these roads went out of use during the Anglo-Saxon period. Conversely, some of the non-Roman roads in use by the early modern period may have come into usage during the Anglo-Saxon period.

By combining archaeological, place-name and charter evidence, the project will shed light on the routeways that were in use during the Anglo-Saxon period. This will be made publicly available in a GIS-generated Online Atlas of the Anglo-Saxon route-system.

 

The Staffordshire Place-Name Project

Work has recently begun to restart the county place-name survey for Staffordshire. The first volume of the English Place-Name Society survey was published in 1984 but its editor, J. P. Oakden, unfortunately passed away before any further volumes were completed.

The INS is now running a volunteer study group, based at the Staffordshire Record Office, which is collecting historic place-name forms from documents held in Stafford.

The project has been running since February 2017, with a regular group of volunteers meeting on a weekly basis at the Staffordshire Record Office. The project was launched with a study day on 4 February, and a second study day is planned in July. Data collected during the project will be used in the completion of the EPNS survey of Staffordshire.

The project has a website, Twitter feed and Facebook page which are regularly updated with news and information.

 

Study With Us

Interested in name-studies? The INS at the University of Nottingham is a leading specialist in the study of place-names and personal names.

Students can specialise in name-studies at undergraduate,
masters, and doctoral level

Events

Holme from Home? East Midland Place-Names and the Story of Viking Settlement

Holme from Home? East Midland Place-Names and the Story of Viking Settlement
Date
20/12/2017
Description
What can place-names tell us about Vikings in the East Midlands?

American Name Society annual meeting

Date
04 - 07/01/2018
Description
The American Name Society will hold its annual meeting in conjunction with the Linguistic Society of America from 4–7 January 2018 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Vikings in your Vocabulary

Vikings in your Vocabulary
Date
10/01/2018
Description
Find out how the Vikings influenced the English language.

Society for Name Studies in Britain and Ireland Spring Conference

Date
06 - 09/04/2018
Description
The Society for Name Studies in Britain and Ireland will hold its annual spring conference in Blackwaterfoot, Arran, from 6–9 April 2018.
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News

Last Year

School of English congratulates new Doctoral Graduates

School of English congratulates new Doctoral Graduates
Description
A celebration of PhD students graduating from the School of English, December 2015

Linguistic performance features in clinical skills exams - report published by King's College London with the University of Nottingham

Linguistic performance features in clinical skills exams - report published by King's College London with the University of Nottingham
Description
A research report published today by King's College London with the University of Nottingham has identified linguistic features that contribute to our understanding of the reasons why International Medical Graduates (IMGs) have a lower success rate than their UK counterparts in the UK's General Practice licensing examination. The research focused on linguistic and cultural factors that could affect performance and was designed to have a positive impact on the ongoing concern about differential pass rates.

AHRC Funding available for postgraduate students in English for October 2015 entry

Description
Midlands3Cities consortium funding from the AHRC: postgraduate studentships available for students beginning a postgraduate course in October 2015

School of English congratulates new Doctoral Graduates

School of English congratulates new Doctoral Graduates
Description
A celebration of PhD students graduating from the School of English, July 2014.

PhD funding: application deadline 9 Jan

Description
UK/EU PhD students in English are invited to apply for AHRC-funded studentships through the Midlands3Cities Doctoral Training Partnership.

Skills Development Opportunity for Early Career Researchers - Languages, Myths and Finds: Translating Norse and Viking Cultures for the 21st Century

Description
AHRC Collaborative Skills Development Programme 2013-14. Languages, Myths and Finds: Translating Norse and Viking Cultures for the 21st Century
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School of English

The University of Nottingham
Nottingham NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 951 5919
fax: +44 (0) 115 846 7526
email: name-studies@nottingham.ac.uk