School of Geography
 

Image of Betsabe De la Barreda-Bautista

Betsabe De la Barreda-Bautista

Research Fellow, Faculty of Social Sciences

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Biography

I am an Earth Observation scientist using GIS and statistics for understanding the enviornment. My main research interests are: a) to improve understanding of how vegetation responds to climatological events by exploring remotely sensed data; b) to monitor these changes through time; c) to understand how ecosystem productivity is linked to environmental conditions; d) assessing vegetation condition and land cover change.

I am currently working as a research associate for UK Space Agency PASSES project responsible for mapping peat condition using observations from satellites through the EU Copernicus programme and emerging industrial hosted processing capabilities. I am also responsible for researching and developing workflows (using R, Python and Google Earth Engine) that afterwards will be part of a platform which will analyse condition and subsidence of peatlands in Indonesia.

Expertise Summary

I study environment processes through remote sensing data.

Teaching Summary

Remote Sensing

Research Summary

I am currently working on the Peatland Assessment in SE Asia by Satellite (PASSES) project funded by the UK Space Agency. I am intending to understand peat condition using Earth Observation from EU… read more

Current Research

I am currently working on the Peatland Assessment in SE Asia by Satellite (PASSES) project funded by the UK Space Agency. I am intending to understand peat condition using Earth Observation from EU Copernicus programme, in particular Sentinel-1 and Sentinel-2 data.

Past Research

My Ph.D. dissertation was supervised by Prof Sarah Metcalfe and Dr Doreen Boyd, employing remote sensing for understanding how different types of vegetation respond to droughts and for relating them to other sources of information such as climatological data and land use.

After my PhD I worked as a Research Associate in two projects. One in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico to understand the impact of droughts using different sources of data (e.g. Sentinel data, climatological data, and qualitative data from anthropological work), and the other one mapping and assessing carbon stocks in three wetlands systems in Mexico.

Future Research

I would love to continue researching the scope of remote sensing for understanding better environmental processes and climate change.

School of Geography

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University of Nottingham
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