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Andrew Prayle

Clinical Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Biography

Andrew graduated from Nottingham in 2003 with a BMBS and entered clinical practice. He commenced the paediatric postgraduate training scheme in 2005. In 2009, he commenced a PhD in child health, and was awarded a NIHR Doctoral Research Fellowship in 2010, where he studied biomarkers of toxicity in children and adults with cystic fibrosis. Post PhD, after a further period of clinical practice he returned to research and holds a NIHR Academic Clinical Lecturer post in Child Health.

Expertise Summary

Clinical research studies: Andrew ran the CEFIT study (a cross sectional observational clinical study) and the CRITIC study (a randomised phase IV pharmacokinetic study). Andrew uses MWPharm for pharmaocokinetic modelling.

In the laboratory, Andrew measures biomarkers of kidney toxicity in urine samples and cultured kidney epithelial cells.

Andrew is the study co-ordinator of 3 pulmonary MRI studies (one in Ataxia telangiectasia (currently recruiting) and two in young children and infants (currently in setup). The goal of these separate but related studies is to identify MRI endpoints suitable for use in clinical trials.

Andrew has an interest in understanding how clinical trials influence research practice, and has ongoing projects in this area. Andrew is interested in applying machine learning to clinical problems.

Andrew teaches an informal seminar series on the R language for statistics within his division.

Research Summary

Andrew is currently working on identifying pulmonary endpoints for clinical trials, with the goal of improving the pulmonary health of children. During childhood the lungs develop and grow, and the… read more

Recent Publications

Current Research

Andrew is currently working on identifying pulmonary endpoints for clinical trials, with the goal of improving the pulmonary health of children. During childhood the lungs develop and grow, and the single biggest predictor of your lifespan as an adult is your lung function. Therefore, it is important to optimize the health of the lungs in childhood. In recent years, it has become clear that our current tools for assessing lung health, particularly in young children, are either too invasive for clinical research, or to insensitive to subtle changes in lung function. Andrew is therefore running a number of projects to investigate the application of pulmonary MRI in children as endpoints in clinical trials.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

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