School of Medicine
  • Print
   
   

School staff listing

People listings by divisions

 

Image of Nick Selby

Nick Selby

Associate Professor of Nephrology, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

Contact

Biography

Dr Selby studied medicine at the University of Nottingham, graduating in 1998. After undertaking post-graduate training in the East Midlands, during which time he completed a Doctor of Medicine (DM) under the supervision of Chris McIntyre, he was appointed a full-time NHS consultant nephrologist at the Royal Derby Hospital in 2009. He maintained an active involvement in research, and in 2015 was appointed Associate Professor of Nephrology at the University of Nottingham, based in Centre for Kidney Research and Innovation (CKRI), Division of Medical Sciences and Graduate Entry Medicine at the Royal Derby Hospital Postgraduate Medical School.

Expertise Summary

Acute Kidney Injury, haemodynamic and cardiovascular consequences of dialysis, Renal imaging

Teaching Summary

I deliver teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels, including the Graduate Entry Medicine pre-clinical course and facilitating problem based learning sessions. I have led a number of… read more

Research Summary

I am a clinical researcher with interests in acute kidney injury (AKI), renal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the haemodynamic and cardiovascular consequences of dialysis. My specific interests… read more

Selected Publications

I deliver teaching at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels, including the Graduate Entry Medicine pre-clinical course and facilitating problem based learning sessions. I have led a number of innovative educational programmes for acute kidney injury in both secondary and primary care.

Current Research

I am a clinical researcher with interests in acute kidney injury (AKI), renal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the haemodynamic and cardiovascular consequences of dialysis. My specific interests are:

Long term outcomes of AKI

I am principle investigator for the AKI Risk in Derby (ARID) study, an investigator-instigated study adopted onto the NIHR portfolio, which will examine the long-term outcomes of AKI in 1084 participants with the aim of developing tools (clinical and biomarker based) that will stratify patients into low and high risk of adverse outcomes (ISRCTN25405995).

Improving AKI care delivery

I led the development of the first e-alert system for AKI that has become a useful tool to allow epidemiological study of AKI (now rolled out nationally via an NHS England Patient Safety Alert) and have delivered service improvement programmes in both primary and secondary care (alongside data collection to evidence efficacy). This has led to Tackling AKI, a multi-centre study funded by the Health Foundation that will test the scalability and effectiveness of a complex AKI intervention in networks of hospitals in Yorkshire and Surrey. This study was completed in 2017 and is due to report its results in 2018.

Novel MRI techniques in renal disease

Our research group is working collaboratively with a team from the Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre (led by Professor Sue Franics, School of Physics and Astronomy), currently undertaking a study in which dynamic MR images of the heart, brain and kidney are being obtained during haemodialysis. This will provide insights into how dialysis affects end-organ blood flow and function, and will allow us to compare the effects of dialysate temperatue on these measurements. An MRC-CiC grant has funded a study of the first clinical application of a new MRI protocol of renal imaging that incorporates a number of measures to quantify renal perfusion, blood flow and oxygenation as well as precise measurements of kidney structure including assessment of fibrosis. This is being applied in patients with chronic and acute kidney disease. Future collaborative work includes development and clinical application of 23Na MRI for kidney diseases and the acute effects of dialysis on skeletal muscle.

iTrend

In collaboration with the Institute for Innovation in Sustainable Engineering, University of Derby, we are using advanced haemodynamic modeling during dialysis with the aim of identifying patients who may be showing signs of deterioration earlier. We hope that this will lead to more individualised ways of providing dialysis for patients that is better tolerated.

School of Medicine

University of Nottingham
Medical School
Nottingham, NG7 2UH

Contacts: Please see our 'contact us' page for further details