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Plant roots sense soil compaction through restricted ethylene diffusion

 

Pandey et al. Science  15 Jan 2021. Vol. 371, Issue 6526, pp. 276-280. DOI: 10.1126/science.abf3013

Scientists have discovered a signal that causes roots to stop growing in hard soils which can be ‘switched off’ to allow them to punch through compacted soil - a discovery that could help plants to grow in even the most damaged soils.

An international research team, led by scientists from the University of Nottingham’s Future Food Beacon and Shanghai Jiao Tong University has discovered how the plant signal ‘ethylene’ causes roots to stop growing in hard soils, but after this signal is disabled, roots are able to push through compacted soil. The research has been published in Science.

Hard (compacted) soils represent a major challenge facing modern agriculture that can reduce crop yields over 50% by reducing root growth, causing significant losses annually. Europe has over 33-million-hectares of soil prone to compaction which represents the highest in the world. Soil compaction triggers a reduction in root penetration and uptake of water and nutrients. Despite its clear importance for agriculture and global food security, the mechanism underpinning root compaction responses has been unclear until now.

A video summary of the research is shown below.

 

Posted on Friday 15th January 2021

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