Optics and Photonics Research Group

 PhD Students 

Nadia Afroze 150x120

Nadia Afroze

PhD title: Optical Fibre Sensing for Healthcare

Supervisors: Prof Stephen MorganProf Barrie Hayes-GillDr Serhiy KorposhDr Ricardo Goncalves Correia

Research Summary
Optical fibre-based measurement techniques have attracted a great deal of attention in a variety of analytical areas such as chemical and biological sensing, environmental monitoring and medical diagnosis. The combination of optical fibres with medical devices provides a unique opportunity for fabrication of devices capable of measuring not only physiological parameters (heart rate, blood flow, respiratory) but also the biochemistry of the human body. This PhD project will focus on interdisciplinary research that combines development and fabrication of sensing techniques based upon optical fibre sensors with medical devices such as catheters and needles. The optical fibre sensors will be used to measure in real time various physiological parameters and biochemistry of the human body. The work will also investigate development of fibre-optic chemical sensors utilising long period gratings and methods for the deposition of polymer thin films followed by their characterization. The devices produced, will be developed in close collaboration with clinicians at Nottingham University Hospitals Trust as part of the Centre for Healthcare Technologies.
 
 
 
Jane-Crowley

Jane Crowley

PhD title: Clinically translatable Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging to improve early detection of digestive cancers.

Supervisors: Dr George Gordon and Amanda Wright

Research Summary
Oesophageal cancer and colon cancer have low five-year survival rates. This is due in part to poor early detection during endoscopic screening, with conventional endoscopes providing insufficient information to spot a wide range of tumours. Specific absorption and reduced scattering properties are known to be linked to malignancies in the oesophagus, and shape is an important indicator in colon cancer. This project looks at Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) as an alternative imaging technique that can measure absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, as well as shape, as potential indicators of cancer. We aim to develop a type of low-cost capsule endoscope which uses SFDI to image the gastrointestinal tract for indicators of early-stage cancer.  
 
 
 

 

 

Alice Crossland

PhD title: Develop new wavefront correction approaches to correct for scattering and abberations when imaging deep into biological tissue.

Supervisors: Prof Amanda Wright and Prof Michael Somekh

Research Summary

Working as part of the InLightenUs Project. The aim is to develop the technology required to image deep into the human body using light and optics, improving the diagnosis and treatment of diseases such as cancer, ​osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis. Aberrations and scattering cause image quality to dramatically deteriorate when imaging deeper into tissue. The aim is to correct for these aberrations and recover lost information. The emphasis is on developing fast and robust approaches that can be translated into a healthcare setting. 

 
 
 

 Itzel-Avila

 

Itzel Avila Castro

PhD title: Continuous ambulatory medical devices using optical fibre sensors and Machine Learning models for prediction of physiological parameters.

Supervisors: Prof Barrie Hayes-Gill, Prof Stephen Morgan, Dr Serhiy Korposh, Dr Ricardo Correia and Dr David Gomez. 

Research Summary

This research consists of developing continuous physiological monitoring devices to reduce the risk of irreversible disease persistence, incorporating the latest advances in optoelectronics and material processing with source/detector optimisation and Machine Learning algorithms to predict physiological parameters. 

 
 
 
Sandor Erdody

Sandor Erdody

PhD title: Real time measurements of chemicals in water using innovative sensors

Supervisors:  Prof Stephen Morgan and Dr Serhiy Korposh 

Research summary
This PhD project runs in collaboration with and is partly funded by an industrial partner. Our aim is to design and develop innovative sensors for in-situ measurements in fresh and sea water for aquatic environment applications. The general principle of the sensor operation is based on the measurements of the physical properties of the certain materials that are sensitive to the particular chemical of interest.  
 
 
 
David Gomez

David Gomez

PhD title: Textile based sensing with functionalized optical fibre sensors

Supervisors:  Prof Stephen Morgan,  Prof Barrie Hayes-Gill and  Dr Serhiy Korposh 

Research summary

The research involves the development of optical fibre sensors to monitor parameters such as humidity and pH to provide better prognosis of healing.

A plastic optical fibre humidity sensor has been developed. This sensor was coated with a hydrophilic film based on PAH/SiO2 nanoparticles. The sensor has demonstrated a more accurate response over humidity changes on skin compared with a commercial sensor. Further work will include the miniaturization of the electronic system to analyse the data obtained in order to provide measurements in real-time and embedding the optical fibre sensor within a textile in order to provide measurements on the wound area. 

 
 
 
Shakila Naznin

Shakila Naznin

PhD title: Nano-Engineering photonic sub-structures for sub-optical cellular imaging

Supervisors: Prof Matt Clark,  Dr Chung See and  Dr Richard Smith

Research summary

The research is focused on advanced opto-acoustic transducer technology for the development of very high resolution ultrasonic imaging.

If the frequency goes up to the GHz region then the wavelength of the ultrasound becomes smaller than that of light and there is potential to create ultrasonic imaging systems with greater resolution than that of optical microscopes. The aim is to explore advanced optoacoustic transducer technology to improve the lateral resolution and control of nano-scale ultrasonic imaging.We are eager to use photonic nanostructures that permit the generation and detection of sub-optical acoustic fields with optical techniques. We want to use metallic nanoshells, nanoparticles and metallic nanoarrays to overcome the limit of lateral resolution. A new state-of-art electron beam lithography tool will be installed for making nanostructures, an ineteresting  part of the project

 
 
 
Finlay Nelson

Finlay Nelson

PhD title: High resolution micro-spectroscopic imaging of bioelectrical impedance

Supervisors: Dr. Sidahmed Abayzeed, Dr. Richard Smith, Dr. George Gordon and  Prof. Matt Clark

Research summary
Unlike traditional light microscopes which produce images of a sample’s optical properties, the focus of this PhD is on developing an impedance microspectroscopy technique which instead generates images of a sample's electrical properties. The electrical properties present a largely untapped reservoir of information relating to both cell structure and function; information that is expected to prove invaluable across a multitude of disciplines relating to cell biology. This technique achieves highly accurate and reliable impedance information, with a sub-micrometer resolution that promises to help solve the unanswered questions concerning sub-cellular electrical behaviour
 
 
 
Don Milesh Pieris

Don Milesh Pieris

PhD title: In-line Non-Destructive Evaluation of Additive Layer Manufactured Components

Supervisors: Dr Steve Sharples, Dr Adam Clare and Dr Rikesh Patel

Research summary

The aim of this EngD project is to develop non-destructive methods for inspecting Additive Layer Manufactured (ALM) components. This method of manufacturing inherently lends itself quite well to in-line inspection as the component is built up layer by layer. This means that once a layer is printed it can be fully inspected but once the component is complete, its intermediate layer(s) cannot be inspected as closely as they could have been during the build stage.

Some of the initial ideas on inspection techniques include laser ultrasonic techniques, such as Spatially Resolved Acoustic Spectroscopy (SRAS), laser ultrasonic phased arrays, ultrasonic transducers and ultrasonic phased arrays.Ultimately, this would mean that in the near future a complex component such as a turbine blade with internal cooling passages could be additively manufactured. The component would be accompanied by some paper work describing the internal characteristics of each layer such as: micro structure; grain orientation; residual stress and hopefully much more.

 
 
 
Olabomi Olaosebikan 150x120

Olabomi Olaosebikan E 

PhD title: Investigations of hybrid photonic crystals and acoustic nanoresonators.

Supervisors:  Prof. Eric LarkinsProf. Anthony Kent, Dr R. Mackenzie

Research Summary
This PhD study will investigate nanometer scale opto-acoustic nanoresonators (primarily photonic crystal resonators).
 
 
 
Yihan Zhang

Yihan Zhang

PhD title: Wavefront shaping approaches for imaging deep into biological samples using non-linear microscopy

Supervisors: Prof Amanda Wright and Prof Michael Somekh

Research Summary
The wavefront shaping approaches will be developed using a laser scanning second harmonic and 1P and 2P fluorescence microscope. It is starting with optimisation-based adaptive optics approaches and moving from this to techniques that reduce iteration number and are able to predict the correction required from a minimal number of aberrations. This move will be done using machine learning in collaboration with Computer Science.   
 
 
 
Yijie (Amy) Zheng

Yijie (Amy) Zheng

PhD title: Developing artificial intelligence tools for the next generation of medical endoscopes

Supervisors: Dr George Gordon, Dr Sendy Phang and Prof Matt Clark

Research Summary
Ultra-thin optical fibre imaging technology has significant potential to enable next-generation medical endoscopes that provide high image resolution in difficult-to-access parts of the body such as blood vessels or the brain. The motivation of this project is to build advanced real-time fibre imaging reconstruction algorithms based on single-ended fibre systems that can largely reduce the computational intensity and maintain the advantage of requiring only proximal facet access and supporting arbitrary fibre matrices. This project shows significant promises for future near real-time image reconstruction systems using ultra-thin optical fibres.  
 
 
 

 

Optics and Photonics Research Group

Faculty of Engineering
The University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD


telephone: +44 (0)115 95 15536
email: optics@nottingham.ac.uk