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Katarina Schwarz

PhD Student, Faculty of Social Sciences

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Biography

Katarina is currently reading for a PhD in law at the University of Nottingham, having transferred from Queen's University Belfast in 2017. Her research explores the nature and scope of reparations in public international law and transitional justice in order to consider the claim to redress for 'historical' enslavement.

Her project, funded under the AHRC Antislavery Usable Past award, is supervised by Professor David Fraser (School of Law) and Professor Kevin Bales (School of Politics and International Relations) and supported by Professor Jean Allain (Monash University) and Doctor Luke Moffett (QUB).

Katarina completed two undergraduate degrees at the University of Otago (New Zealand) - a Bachelor of Laws (First Class) and Bachelor of Arts (First Class) in Theatre and Performing Arts - as well as an 'Honours' qualification in Law with a thesis in international law.

Expertise Summary

Katarina's interests and research span multiple fields, including international law, transitional justice, human rights, international criminal law, humanitarian law, 'post-colonial' and 'post-conflict' studies, and legal history. In particular, she focuses upon the prohibition against slavery in both domestic and international contexts and the right to remedy in international and human rights law.

Katarina has been involved in a number of advocacy projects concerned with human exploitation and reparations in international criminal law, including working with Antislavery International in developing legal tools for NGOs in India dealing with bonded labour, and on the development of Model Antislavery Legislation (in collaboration with Professor Jean Allain). She has also been involved in a number of submissions to the International Criminal Court, Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia, and the Special Rapporteur on Contemporary forms of Slavery, and served as the Secretary of the Working Group on Contemporary Slavery at QUB.

Teaching Summary

Katarina is currently working on a module (Policy and Legal Frameworks) for the upcoming Masters in Slavery and Liberation (School of Politics and International Relations) launching in the fall… read more

Research Summary

Reparatory Justice and the Maangamizi: Redressing Historical Enslavement

This AHRC funded doctoral research explores the theory and practice of reparations in public international law and transitional justice to develop an understanding of reparatory justice against which claims for redress for historical enslavement and the Maangamizi may be assessed. It considers the development of 'international law' and the crystallisation of the prohibition against slavery to clarify contemporary dialogue on the claim to reparations for the Maangamizi - the African holocaust of chattel, colonial and neo-colonial enslavement. Katarina's project addresses the residual effects of enslavement in the contemporary world, the intergenerational and continuing harms connected to enslavement, and potential avenues for resolution.

This project is supervised by Professor David Fraser and Professor Kevin Bales.

Slavery in Domestic Jurisdictions

This research, initiated by the Working Group on Contemporary Slavery (Queen's University Belfast), collates the domestic legislation dealing with slavery, servitude, forced and compulsory labour, and human trafficking of all 193 UN Member States. It provides a framework for assessing the implementation of international obligations on human exploitation in domestic law with an expansive dataset covering both international and national laws.

Model Antislavery Legislation

This project, in collaboration with Antislavery International, develops model antislavery provisions and extensive guidance on the implementation of national antislavery laws and the requirements of compliance with international law concerning human exploitation.

Katarina is currently working on a module (Policy and Legal Frameworks) for the upcoming Masters in Slavery and Liberation (School of Politics and International Relations) launching in the fall (2017/2018), both designing and teaching on this module.

She has previously taught at both Queen's University Belfast and the University of Otago in Legal Theory (Jurisprudence), Constitutional Law, Legal History, The Legal System, and Legal Skills (case analysis, statutory interpretation, and research and writing).

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