logo

Faulty 'off-switch' stops children with ADHD from concentrating

   
   
ADHDswitchpr 
06 Jan 2011 13:37:25.260

PA 04/11

Brain scans of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have shown for the first time why people affected by the condition sometimes have difficulty in concentrating. The study, by experts at The University of Nottingham, may explain why parents often say that their child can maintain concentration when they are doing something that interests them, but struggles with boring tasks.

Using a 'Whac-a-Mole' style game, researchers from the Motivation, Inhibition and Development in ADHD Study (MIDAS) group found evidence that children with ADHD require either much greater incentives — or their usual stimulant medication — to focus on a task.

The research, funded by the Wellcome Trust, found that when the incentive was low, the children with ADHD failed to “switch off” brain regions involved in mind-wandering. When the incentive was high, however, or they were taking their medication, their brain activity was indistinguishable from a typically-developing non-ADHD child.

Click here for full story

Professor Chris Hollis, in the School of Community Health Sciences, led the study. He said: “The results are exciting because for the first time we are beginning to understand how in children with ADHD incentives and stimulant medication work in a similar way to alter patterns of brain activity and enable them to concentrate and focus better. It also explains why in children with ADHD their performance is often so variable and inconsistent, depending as it does on their interest in a particular task.” 

ADHD is the most common mental health disorder in childhood, affecting around one in 50 children in the UK. Children with ADHD are excessively restless, impulsive and distractible, and experience difficulties at home and in school. Although no cure exists for the condition, symptoms can be reduced by medication and/or behavioural therapy. The drug methylphenidate (more often known by the brand name Ritalin) is commonly used to treat the condition.

Previous studies have shown that children with ADHD have difficulty in ‘switching-off’ the default mode network (DMN) in their brains. This network is usually active when we are doing nothing, giving rise to spontaneous thoughts or ‘daydreams’, but is suppressed when we are focused on the task before us. In children with ADHD, however, it is thought that the DMN may be insufficiently suppressed on ‘boring’ tasks that require focused attention.

The MIDAS group researchers, which included Dr Martin Batty and Dr Elizabeth Liddle, compared brain scans of 18 children with ADHD, aged between nine and 15 years old, against scans of a similar group of children without the condition as both groups took part in a task designed to test how well they were able to control their behaviour. The children with ADHD were tested when they were taking their methylphenidate and when they were off their medication. The findings are published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

Whilst lying in a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner, which can be used to measure activity in the brain, the children played a computer game in which green aliens were randomly interspersed with less frequent black aliens, each appearing for a short interval. Their task was to ‘catch’ as many green aliens as possible, while avoiding catching black aliens. For each slow or missed response, they would lose one point; they would gain one point for each timely response.

To study the effect of incentives, the reward for avoiding catching the black alien was then increased to five points, with a five-point penalty incurred for catching the wrong alien.

By studying the brain scans, the researchers were able to show that typically developing children switched off their DMN network whenever they saw an item requiring their attention.  However, unless the incentive was high, or they had taken their medication, the children with ADHD would fail to switch off the DMN and would perform poorly. This effect of incentives was not seen in children without ADHD — activity in their DMN was switched off by items requiring their attention regardless of the incentive on offer.

Dr Batty said: “Using brain imaging we have been able to see inside the children’s heads and observe what it is about ADHD that is stopping them concentrating. Most people are able to control their ‘daydreaming’ state and focus on the task at hand. This is not the case with children with ADHD. If a task is not sufficiently interesting, they cannot switch off their background brain activity and they are easily distracted. Making a task more interesting — or providing methylphenidate — turns down the volume and allows them to concentrate.”

Dr Liddle said: “These findings help explain one of the interesting characteristics of ADHD — that children with the condition appear able to control themselves much better when motivated to do so.

“The common complaint about children with ADHD is that ‘he can concentrate and control himself fine when he wants to’, so some people just think the child is being naughty when he misbehaves. We have shown that this may be a very real difficulty for them.  The off-switch for their ‘internal world’ seems to need a greater incentive to function properly and allow them to attend to their task.”

Details of their research can be found at: Task-related Default Mode Network modulation and inhibitory control in ADHD: effects of motivation and methylphenidate. Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry; e-pub in advance, Nov 12 2010.

 

— Ends —

 

Notes to editors: The University of Nottingham, described by The Times as “the nearest Britain has to a truly global university”, has award-winning campuses in the United Kingdom, China and Malaysia. It is ranked in the UK's Top 10 and the World's Top 75 universities by the Shanghai Jiao Tong (SJTU) and the QS World University Rankings.

The University is committed to providing a truly international education for its 39,000 students, producing world-leading research and benefiting the communities around its campuses in the UK and Asia.

More than 90 per cent of research at The University of Nottingham is of international quality, according to the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with almost 60 per cent of all research defined as ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’. Research Fortnight analysis of RAE 2008 ranked the University 7th in the UK by research power.

The University’s vision is to be recognised around the world for its signature contributions, especially in global food security, energy & sustainability, and health.

More news from the University at: www.nottingham.ac.uk/news

University facts and figures at: www.nottingham.ac.uk/about/facts/factsandfigures.aspx

Additional information: For more information about MIDAS, visit

www.midas-adhd.org.uk

 

The Wellcome Trust is a global charity dedicated to achieving extraordinary improvements in human and animal health. It supports the brightest minds in biomedical research and the medical humanities. The Trust's breadth of support includes public engagement, education and the application of research to improve health. It is independent of both political and commercial interests. www.wellcome.ac.uk

Story credits

More information is available from Professor Chris Hollis on +44 (0)115 823 0258, chris.hollis@nottingham.ac.uk; or Craig Brierley, Senior Media Officer at The Wellcome Trust on +44 (0)20 7611 7329, c.brierley@wellcome.ac.uk

Lindsay Brooke

Lindsay Brooke - Media Relations Manager

Email: lindsay.brooke@nottingham.ac.uk Phone: +44 (0)115 951 5751 Location: University Park

Additional resources

No additional resources for this article

Related articles

Breaking down barriers in child mental health

Published Date
Monday 6th December 2010

Early detection of ADHD could relieve long term consequences

Published Date
Monday 13th August 2012

Investigating ADHD in children born prematurely

Published Date
Thursday 18th July 2013

Take smoking completely out of children's lives

Published Date
Wednesday 24th March 2010

Delays in UK child brain tumour diagnosis

Published Date
Thursday 6th August 2009

Road-mapping the Asian brain

Published Date
Tuesday 3rd July 2012

Hosting Malaysia's largest psychology conference

Published Date
Wednesday 19th October 2011

Alice's Wonderland inspires science's Wondermind

Published Date
Friday 4th November 2011

Call for 'Big Society' action on violence to children

Published Date
Monday 14th March 2011

News and Media - Marketing, Communications and Recruitment

The University of Nottingham
C Floor, Pope Building (Room C4)
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 951 5765
email: communications@nottingham.ac.uk