Keeping soft fruit 'fur-free' for longer

   
   
MouldyFruit
11 Mar 2011 00:00:00.000
PA 71/11

A new way of improving the shelf life of soft fruit like strawberries and raspberries is being pioneered by researchers at The University of Nottingham.

Millions of tons of soft fruit go to waste each year through mould developing on the fragile produce which deteriorates rapidly after picking. Now scientists at Nottingham have joined forces with colleagues at Loughborough University and UK fruit growers Berryworld to use cold plasma technology to keep the mould at bay for longer.

Cold plasma is already used in the medical world to clean bacteria from wounds safely. It was a chance discovery that led the team of food scientists and microbiologists to believe that cold plasma might also be useful in the food sector. They had previously been using the technology, which involves a tiny controllable beam of plasma, similar to lightning, to control micro-organisms and to sterilise surfaces.

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Associate Professor in Microbiology at The University of Nottingham, Dr Cath Rees said: “While we were doing that we discovered that we could treat soft fruit with the plasma beam. Soft fruit is notoriously difficult to keep ‘fur free’ for long, as it bruises easily when handled and becomes contaminated. The cold plasma technology would present a way of eradicating moulds early in the packing process.

“Our findings showed that we could prevent that perennial problem of fruit going mouldy once you get it home. This means better value for the customers and fewer losses for the producers, who normally remove the mouldy ones before the fruit is sold.”

The researchers in the Division of Food Sciences in the School of Biosciences at the University’s Sutton Bonington campus are working with the Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering at Loughborough University to see how effective the technique could be. Early results suggest the cold plasma treatment gives the produce an extra five days of shelf-life. It could have a significant impact on the economics of soft fruit production.

The project is one of five Collaborative Research and Development grants worth a total of more than  £235,000 announced by the East Midlands Food and Drink iNet, which co-ordinates innovation support for businesses, universities and individuals working in the food and drink sector in the region. The iNet is funded by the East Midlands Development Agecy (emda) and the European Regional Development Fund.

Food and Drink iNet Director Richard Worrall said: “We are pleased to be able to support this innovative research project which has important potential for the soft fruit sector. Discovering a non-destructive, non-contact and non-residue leaving process that helps extend the shelf-life of soft fruit and prevent wastage could bring major benefits.

“Our Food and Drink iNet Collaborative Research and Development funding is designed to provide help for innovative research schemes that will benefit the food and drink sector in the future, and we are proud to be associated with this project.”

The Food and Drink iNet aims to build on the tradition of innovation in the food and drink industry in the region by helping to create opportunities to develop knowledge and skills, and to help research, develop and implement new products, markets, services and processes. It is managed by a consortium, led by the Food and Drink Forum and including Food Processing Faraday, Nottingham Trent University, the University of Lincoln, and The University of Nottingham. It is based at Southglade Food Park, Nottingham, with advisors covering the East Midlands region.

For more information visit www.eminnovation.org.uk/food

— Ends —

Notes to editors: The University of Nottingham, described by The Sunday Times University Guide 2011 as ‘the embodiment of the modern international university’, has award-winning campuses in the United Kingdom, China and Malaysia. It is ranked in the UK's Top 10 and the World's Top 75 universities by the Shanghai Jiao Tong (SJTU) and the QS World University Rankings. It was named ‘Europe’s greenest university’ in the UI GreenMetric World University Ranking, a league table of the world’s most environmentally-friendly higher education institutions, which ranked Nottingham second in the world overall.

The University is committed to providing a truly international education for its 40,000 students, producing world-leading research and benefiting the communities around its campuses in the UK and Asia.

More than 90 per cent of research at The University of Nottingham is of international quality, according to the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, with almost 60 per cent of all research defined as ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’. Research Fortnight analysis of RAE 2008 ranked the University 7th in the UK by research power. The University’s vision is to be recognised around the world for its signature contributions, especially in global food security, energy & sustainability, and health.

More news from the University at:

www.nottingham.ac.uk/news

Story credits

More information is available from Dr Cath Rees, School of Biosciences, on +44 (0)115 951 6167, cath.rees@nottingham.ac.uk; or Food and Drink iNet interim director Richard Worrall on 0845 521 2066.

EmmaRayner2

Emma Rayner - Media Relations Manager

Email: emma.rayner@nottingham.ac.uk Phone: +44 (0)115 951 5793 Location: University Park

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