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Nottingham leads £2.6m international clinical trial into new stroke treatment

   
   
CT scan of the human brain
18 Mar 2013 15:17:31.333
PA 84/13

Scientists in Nottingham are leading an international study to investigate the effectiveness of a new treatment on a devastating type of stroke.

The team at The University of Nottingham has been awarded £2.6 million by the National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) Programme to lead the clinical trial into the use of the drug tranexamic acid in people who have suffered an intracerebral haemorrhage, a type of stroke caused by bleeding in the brain.

Leading the trial, Dr Nikola Sprigg in the University’s Division of Stroke, said: “This is potentially very exciting — this drug could offer new hope for a condition for which there is currently no effective treatment.
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“If successful, it could potentially improve the lives of thousands of people with haemorrhagic stroke, preventing deaths and reducing disability to increase their chances of leading a full and independent life.”

Around 150,000 people in the UK suffer a stroke every year — the majority of these are ischaemic strokes caused by a blocked blood vessel on the brain which can be treated very successfully in many cases with the use of clot-busting drugs (thrombolysis) administered within 4.5 hours of the stroke.

Debilitating disabilities

However, 15 per cent of all strokes — affecting around 22,000 people every year — are caused by haemorrhagic stroke when a blood vessel in the brain bursts, leading to permanent damage. Whilst all people with acute stroke benefit from treatment on a stroke unit, there is currently no specific treatment for haemorrhagic stroke and unfortunately many people affected will die within a few days. Those who do survive are often left with debilitating disabilities including paralysis and an inability to speak.

The four-year study will recruit around 2,000 people from 120 hospitals and stroke units, initially across the UK and then worldwide — these will be people who come into hospital as an emergency after suffering from a suspected stroke.

It follows a small pilot study last year, funded by The University of Nottingham and charity the Stroke Association, which concluded that a larger study was needed to accurately assess the effectiveness of the drug tranexamic acid. The drug was chosen for the study after previous research showed that it was successful in stopping bleeding in people involved in road traffic accidents.

For the latest trial, people who are diagnosed as having had bleeding on the brain — confirmed by CT scan —will be offered the chance to take part in the study. Where the person is too ill to decide, permission will be asked of their family.

Reducing damage 

Half of those who sign up will be given the drug within eight hours of their stroke while half will receive a placebo. The patient’s progress will be carefully monitored in hospital over the course of the next seven days and they will receive a second CT scan to see whether the amount of blood on the brain has increased.

The study team will then follow up with the person after three months to assess their recovery, level of disability and how independent they are following their stroke.

The rationale behind giving the treatment so quickly (less than eight hours after stroke onset), is in an attempt to reduce the risk of continued bleeding, therefore potentially reducing the amount of permanent brain damage caused.

The Division of Stroke and Nottingham Stroke Trials Unit, based at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust’s City Hospital campus, has an international reputation for clinical and laboratory research in stroke. It also works closely with NHS colleagues in running the nationally-acclaimed clinical stroke service at the hospital.

Recruitment starts this week, initially at 30 UK centres including Nottingham, with further centres across the UK and worldwide expected to join the study in coming months.

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Notes to editors: The University of Nottinghamhas 42,000 students at award-winning campuses in the United Kingdom, China and Malaysia. It was ‘one of the first to embrace a truly international approach to higher education’, according to the Sunday Times University Guide 2013. It is also one of the most popular universities among graduate employers, one of the world’s greenest universities, and winner of the Times Higher Education Award for ‘Outstanding Contribution to Sustainable Development’. It is ranked in the UK's Top 10 and the World's Top 75 universities by the Shanghai Jiao Tong and the QS World Rankings.

More than 90 per cent of research at The University of Nottingham is of international quality, according to the most recent Research Assessment Exercise. The University aims to be recognised around the world for its signature contributions, especially in global food security, energy & sustainability, and health. The University won a Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education for its research into global food security.

Impact: The Nottingham Campaign, its biggest ever fundraising campaign, will deliver the University’s vision to change lives, tackle global issues and shape the future. More news…

 

This article/paper/report presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) Programme funds research about the effectiveness, costs, and broader impact of health technologies for those who use, manage and provide care in the NHS. It is the largest NIHR programme and publishes the results of its research in the Health Technology Assessment journal, with over 600 issues published to date. The journal’s 2011 Impact Factor (4.255) ranked it in the top 10 per cent of medical and health-related journals. All issues are available for download, free of charge, from the website. The HTA Programme is funded by the NIHR, with contributions from the CSO in Scotland, NISCHR in Wales, and the HSC R&D Division, Public Health Agency in Northern Ireland. www.hta.ac.uk.

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government’s strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit the NIHR website (www.nihr.ac.uk).

Story credits

More information is available from Dr Nikola Sprigg and the TICH-2 trials team on +44 (0)115 8231770, tich-2@nottingham.ac.uk
Emma Thorne

Emma Thorne - Media Relations Manager

Email: emma.thorne@nottingham.ac.uk Phone: +44 (0)115 951 5793 Location: University Park

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