£1.1m study to reduce cognitive problems in people with MS

Thoughtful woman looking out of the window
25 Mar 2015 15:33:48.647
PA 48/15

Experts in Nottingham are leading a major new study into how people with multiple sclerosis (MS) could overcome problems with attention and memory associated to their condition.

The Cognitive Rehabilitation for Attention and Memory in people with Multiple Sclerosis (CRAMMS) trial will evaluate the effectiveness of new strategies to improve and compensate for these difficulties and aims to improve the quality of life for the patient.

The trial is being led by Nadina Lincoln, Professor of Clinical Psychology in the Division of Rehabilitation and Ageing at The University of Nottingham and Dr Roshan das Nair, consultant clinical psychologist at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and honorary Associate Professor in the University’s Division of Rehabilitation and Ageing.
Click here for full story
Funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment (HTA) programme, the trial will begin recruiting participants later this month.

Common complaint

Professor Lincoln said: “The purpose of our research is to help people with multiple sclerosis boost their everyday memory so they can get on with their lives and do the things that people take for granted, for example remembering to pick their children up from school, turning the stove off, or knowing where they have put things.

“It will also provide them with strategies to enable them to concentrate on information without getting distracted.”

Memory and attention problems are common complaints for those who have multiple sclerosis. More than 100,000 people in the UK have multiple sclerosis and of these, 50,000 will have problems with attention and memory at some stage in the progression of their condition.

Very few people with multiple sclerosis get treatment for cognitive problems in usual clinical practice, despite some evidence that cognitive rehabilitation may help reduce problems in attention and everyday forgetting. However, cognitive rehabilitation for people with multiple sclerosis has not been demonstrated to be effective or cost-effective in large-scale randomised controlled trials.

Mneumonic memory aids

The study will be exploring the benefits of using internal memory aids, such as mnemonics — using patterns, words and images to remember details — and external aids, such as diaries, mobile phones and cameras. The researchers will also be looking for other imaginative ways to help improve memory and reduce forgetting.

The study is being conducted in collaboration with Nottingham Clinical Trials Unit, Swansea University, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, The Walton Centre NHS Trust, and University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Trust.

They will recruit 400 volunteers, aged 16 to 69 years, from NHS hospitals, rehabilitation centres, multiple sclerosis charities, and web forums. About half the volunteers will then receive a 10-week group intervention at one of the study centres in Nottingham, Sheffield, Liverpool and Birmingham. The groups will focus on strategies to improve attention and to reduce memory problems in daily life. The remaining volunteers will continue to receive their existing level of care.

If this study confirms the benefits of cognitive rehabilitation it could lead to a change in clinical practice in the NHS and abroad. The researchers will also use questionnaires to determine the cost-effectiveness of this intervention, and to get feedback from those taking part in the trial to establish if intervention improved their quality of life.

— Ends —

Our academics can now be interviewed for broadcast via our Media Hub, which offers a Globelynx fixed camera and ISDN line facilities at University Park campus. For further information please contact a member of the Communications team on +44 (0)115 951 5798, email mediahub@nottingham.ac.uk or see the Globelynx website for how to register for this service.

For up to the minute media alerts, follow us on Twitter

Notes to editors: The University of Nottingham has 43,000 students and is ‘the nearest Britain has to a truly global university, with campuses in China and Malaysia modelled on a headquarters that is among the most attractive in Britain’ (Times Good University Guide 2014). It is also one of the most popular universities in the UK among graduate employers, in the top 10 for student experience according to the Times Higher Education and winner of ‘Research Project of the Year’ at the THE Awards 2014. It is ranked in the world’s top one per cent of universities by the QS World University Rankings, and 8th in the UK by research power according to REF 2014.

The University of Nottingham in Malaysia (UNMC) is holding events throughout 2015 to celebrate 15 years as a pioneer of transnational education. Based in Semenyih, UMNC was established as the UK's first overseas campus in Malaysia and one of the first world-wide.

Impact: The Nottingham Campaign, its biggest-ever fundraising campaign, is delivering the University’s vision to change lives, tackle global issues and shape the future. More news…

The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment (NIHR HTA) Programme funds research about the effectiveness, costs, and broader impact of health technologies for those who use, manage and provide care in the NHS. It is the largest NIHR programme and publishes the results of its research in the Health Technology Assessment journal, with over 700 issues published to date. The journal’s 2013 Impact Factor (5.116) ranked it two out of 85 publications in the Health Care Sciences and Services category. All issues are available for download, free of charge, from the website. The HTA Programme is funded by the NIHR, with contributions from the CSO in Scotland, NISCHR in Wales, and the HSC R&D Division, Public Health Agency in Northern Ireland. www.nets.nihr.ac.uk/programmes/hta 

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government’s strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit the NIHR website (www.nihr.ac.uk).

This article presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR or the Department of Health.

Story credits

More information is available from Professor Nadina Lincoln in the School of Medicine, University of Nottingham on +44 (0)115 951 5315, nadina.lincoln@nottingham.ac.uk

Emma Thorne Emma Thorne - Media Relations Manager

Email: emma.thorne@nottingham.ac.uk Phone: +44 (0)115 951 5793 Location: University Park

Additional resources

No additional resources for this article

Related articles

The balancing act between protection and inflammation in MS

Published Date
Friday 17th February 2012

MRI research sheds new light on nerve fibres in the brain

Published Date
Tuesday 23rd October 2012

Breakthrough in the search for new treatments for MS

Published Date
Tuesday 21st June 2011

Media Relations - External Relations

The University of Nottingham
C Floor, Pope Building (Room C4)
University Park
Nottingham, NG7 2RD

telephone: +44 (0) 115 951 5798
email: communications@nottingham.ac.uk