Mixed Reality Laboratory
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MRL at CSCW 2017 

Logo for the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work

The Mixed Reality Lab will present three archival papers at CSCW, the 20th annual ACM conference for Computer-Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing, hosted in Portland, Oregon. A further forward-looking workshop will take place at the conference, to explore the use of conversational agents, such as Siri or Alexa, and how they are– or could be used in collaborative action.




  

Archival Papers

“Do Animals Have Accents?”: Talking with Agents in Multi-Party Conversation 

In this paper we unpack the use of conversational agents, or so-called intelligent personal assistants (IPAs), in multi- party conversation amongst a group of friends while they are socialising in a café. IPAs such as Siri or Google Now can be found on a large proportion of personal smartphones and tablets, and are promoted as ‘natural language’ interfaces. The question we pursue here is how they are actually drawn upon in conversational practice? In our work we examine the use of these IPAs in a mundane and common-place setting and employ an ethnomethodological perspective to draw out the character of the IPA-use in conversation. Additionally, we highlight a number of nuanced practicalities of their use in multi-party settings. By providing a depiction of the nature and methodical practice of their use, we are able to contribute our findings to the design of IPAs.

Image from CSCW 2017 paper "'Do Animals Have Accents?': Talking with Agents in Multi-party Conversation"

Martin Porcheron, Joel E. Fischer, and Sarah Sharples.

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“It’s Not Yet A Gift”: Understanding Digital Gifting

A myriad of digital artifacts are routinely exchanged online. While previous studies suggest that these are sometimes considered to be gifts, CSCW has largely overlooked explicit digital gifting where people deliberately choose to give digital media as gifts. We present an interview study that systematically analyzes the nature of digital gifting in comparison to conventional physical gifting. A five-stage gift exchange model, synthesized from the literature, frames this study. Findings reveal that there are distinctive gaps in people’s engagement with the digital gifting process compared to physical gifting. Participants’ accounts show how digital gifts often involve less labor, are sometimes not perceived as gifts by the recipient and are rarely reflected on and reciprocated. We conclude by drawing out design implications for digital gifting services and rituals.

Image from CSCW 2017 paper '“It’s Not Yet A Gift”: Understanding Digital Gifting'

Hyosun Kwon, Boriana Koleva, Holger Schnadelbach, and Steve Benford.

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“They’re all going out to something weird”: Workflow, Legacy and Metadata in the Music Production Process

In this paper we use results from two ethnographic studies of the music production process to examine some key issues regarding how work is currently accomplished in studio production environments. These issues relate in particular to workflows and how metadata is adapted to the specific needs of specific parts of the process. We find that there can be significant tensions between how reasoning is applied to metadata at different stages of production and that this can lead to overheads where metadata has to be either changed or created anew to make the process work. On the basis of these findings we articulate some of the potential solutions we are now examining. These centre in particular upon the notions of Digital/Dynamic Musical Objects and flexible metadata shells.

Image from CSCW 2017 paper: "'They’re all going out to something weird': Workflow, Legacy and Metadata in the Music Production Process"

Glenn McGarry, Peter Tolmie, Steve Benford, Chris Greenhalgh, Andy Crabtree, and Alan Chamberlain.

 

 

Workshop

Talking with Conversational Agents in Collaborative Action

This one-day workshop intends to bring together both academics and industry practitioners to explore collaborative challenges in speech interaction. Recent improvements in speech recognition and computing power has led to conversational interfaces being introduced to many of the devices we use every day, such as smartphones, watches, and even televisions. These interfaces allow users to get things done, often by just speaking commands, relying on a reasonably well understood single-user model. While research on speech recognition is well established, the social implications of these interfaces remain underexplored, such as how we socialise, work, and play around such technologies, and how these might be better designed to support collaborative collocated talk-in-action. Moreover, the advent of new products such as the Amazon Echo, which are positioned as supporting multi-user interaction in collocated environments such as the home, makes exploring the social and collaborative challenges around these products, a timely topic. In the workshop, we will review current practices and reflect upon prior work on studying talk-in-action and collocated interactions. We wish to begin a dialogue that takes on the renewed interest in research on spoken interaction with devices, grounded in the existing practices of the CSCW community.

Martin Porcheron, Joel E. Fischer, Moira McGregor, Barry Brown, Ewa Luger, Heloisa Candello, and Kenton O’Hara.

Workshop Website

 

 

References

Archival Papers

Martin Porcheron, Joel E. Fischer, and Sarah Sharples. 2017. “Do Animals Have Accents?”: Talking with Agents in Multi-Party Conversation. In Proceedings of the 20th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW ’17). ACM, New York, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.1145/2998181.2998298

Hyosun Kwon, Boriana Koleva, Holger Schnadelbach, and Steve Benford. 2017. “It’s Not Yet A Gift”: Understanding Digital Gifting. In Proceedings of the 20th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW ’17). ACM, New York, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.1145/2998181.2998225

Glenn McGarry, Peter Tolmie, Steve Benford, Chris Greenhalgh, and Alan Chamberlain. 2017. “They’re all going out to something weird”: Workflow, Legacy and Metadata in the Music Production Process. In Proceedings of the 20th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing (CSCW ’17). ACM, New York, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.1145/2998181.2998325

Workshop

Martin Porcheron, Joel E. Fischer, Moira McGregor, Barry Brown, Ewa Luger, Heloisa Candello, and Kenton O’Hara. 2017. Talking with Conversational Agents in Collaborative Action. In Proceedings of the 20th ACM Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing Companion (CSCW ’17 Companion). ACM, New York, NY, USA. https://doi.org/10.1145/3022198.3022666

 

 

Posted on Thursday 1st December 2016

Mixed Reality Laboratory

The University of Nottingham
School of Computer Science
Nottingham, NG8 1BB


telephone: +44 (0) 115 846 6780
email: mrl@cs.nott.ac.uk