School of Veterinary Medicine and Science
   
   
  
 

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Mark Dunning

Clinical Associate Professor in Small Animal Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences

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Teaching Summary

I am currently involved in producing and delivering lectures, practicals and facilitated sessions on a wide range of small animal subjects to undergraduate veterinary students.

I am involved in running the final year small animal referral rotation which focuses on developing clinical reasoning skills and practical techniques.

Research Summary

Some of our current research is focused on the development of diagnostic techniques and analysers to aid with initial screening tests for common conditions to be used by veterinary surgeons based in… read more

Selected Publications

Current Research

Some of our current research is focused on the development of diagnostic techniques and analysers to aid with initial screening tests for common conditions to be used by veterinary surgeons based in primary care practice.

A further area of research is on the epidemiology and genetics of osteosarcoma in susceptible giant breeds of dogs.

We are currently working with a number of susceptible breeds investigating the factors that influence the development and outcome of GDV.

Allied to the above projects, we are also working with a number of breed groups helping to conduct longitudinal health studies.

An additional clinical interest is the development of clinical reasoning skills in veterinary undergraduates and the ways in which this can be augmented.

Past Research

My doctoral research project was in experimental neuroscience. This investigated the potential for CNS glial cells to be labeled with a number of paramagnetic contrast agents. The functional impact of this labeling was assessed both in vitro and in vivo. The ability of the cells to be followed in vivo using MRI was also investigated at various time points and proven to be possible. It was also demonstrated that these cells retained their function.

Some areas of previous research have included:

Investigating the efficacy of hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in the cat secondary to acromegaly.

Investigating the comparative outcomes of medically vs surgically managed portosystemic shunts in dogs.

Investigating the expression of Cox-2 in canine nasal tumours and the prognostic significance thereof.

Investigations into disorders of secondary haemostasis in Weimaraners.

School of Veterinary Medicine and Science

University of Nottingham
Sutton Bonington Campus
Leicestershire, LE12 5RD

telephone: +44 (0)115 951 6116
fax: +44 (0)115 951 6415
email: veterinary-enquiries@nottingham.ac.uk