All about Electrochemistry
Site contains introductory material in basic electrochemistry. Topics include galvanic cells, electrodes, cell potentials and thermodynamics, Nernst, batteries and fuel cells.
Author(s): Stephen Lower

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Dr. Seuss' Birthday Celebrated With Party
Thursday, Mar. 4, 2010 Contact: Angela Wamsley, event coordinator, Student Washington Education Association Educator's Club, wsuswea@gmail.com PULLMAN, Wash. -- Parents and children packed a room at Cleveland Hall to make crafts and listen to books by Dr. Seuss Wednesday night. It was part of a "Family Night" celebrated in the Washington State University campus to encourage reading and celebrate Dr. Seuss. The event was organized by the Student Washington Education Association Educator's Club.
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DRC Plenary: Joan Snyder, 2010-11 Estelle Lebowitz Visiting Artist-in-Residence
Wednesday, February 28, 2011 Joan Snyder received the MacArthur Fellowship Award (popularly known as the "Genius Award") in 2007, and her paintings have been exhibited widely throughout the United States. She founded the Women Artist Series at Douglass College in 1971 (which has since then been renamed the Mary H. Dana Women Artist Series). A concurrent survey exhibition of her small paintings from 1965-2010, Joan Snyder/Intimate Works, is on view at the Mabel Smith Douglass Library Galleries t
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Introduction to Philosophy
This course is an introduction to philosophy for students seeking (or being forced) to fulfill the first of their university philosophy requirements. The course is intended to introduce you to philosophical questions, to make you aware of how some of history's greatest philosophers have approached those questions and what they have had to say about them, to help you articulate philosophical concerns of your own and, most importantly, to learn how to address them. Among the areas of philosophy wi
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Introductory Physics I
Welcome to the NROC Introductory Physics course. This course is divided into two semesters and is designed to acquaint you with topics in classical and modern physics. The first semester discusses topics in Newtonian mechanics including: kinematics, laws of motion, work and energy, systems of particles, momentum, circular motion, oscillations, and gravitation. The first semester concludes with topics in fluid mechanics, thermal physics, and kinetic theory. The second semester discusses the topic
Author(s): Monterey Institute for Technology and Education an

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AP Physics C II
Welcome to the NROC Advanced Placement (AP) Physics C course. This curriculum covers all of the material outlined by the College Board as necessary to prepare students to pass the AP Physics C exam. This course is designed to acquaint you with topics in mechanics and classical electricity and magnetism. The course covers two semesters. The first semester is devoted to Newtonian mechanics including: kinematics, laws of motion, work and energy, systems of particles, momentum, circular motion, osci
Author(s): Monterey Institute for Technology and Education an

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AP Physics C I
This course is designed to acquaint you with topics in mechanics and classical electricity and magnetism. The course covers two semesters. The first semester is devoted to Newtonian mechanics including: kinematics, laws of motion, work and energy, systems of particles, momentum, circular motion, oscillations, and gravitation. The second semester discusses the topics of electricity and magnetism. The course emphasizes problem solving including calculus, and there are numerous interactive examples
Author(s): Monterey Institute for Technology and Education an

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Population Density: How Much Space Do You Have?
Students learn about population density within environments and ecosystems. They determine the density of a population and think about why population density and distribution information is useful to engineers for city planning and design as well as for resource allocation.
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Gerry Wright on the Michael G Degroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research
Gerry Wright, director of the Michael G Degroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research at McMaster University, talks about the work performed in his lab and by his colleagues.
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Dangerous Air
By tracing the movement of radiation released during an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, students see how air pollution, like particulate matter, can become a global issue.
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Travel With Care Safety Tip 4
The City of Auburn and Auburn University have partnered to bring Travel With Care Auburn, a public safety campaign aimed at audiences using all forms of transportation: motorists, pedestrians, cyclists, and transit riders. Throughout the week of April 4-8, members of the Auburn Public Safety - Police Division will be patrolling city streets and the Auburn University campus to bring awareness to traffic issues, while student volunteers will pass out informational brochures.
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Understanding Leukemias
This tutorial is designed to aid medical students at all levels understand the laboratory diagnosis of leukemias. It includes introductory material on the basic laboratory tests specific to diagnoses, their general application and pitfalls in interpretation. The introductory material is followed by a series of short clinical vignettes illustrating the major categories of leukemia. This tutorial focuses on diagnosis and relative little on treatment is included. he tutorial concludes with a short
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Sticks and Stones Will Break That Bone!
Students learn about the strength of bones and methods of helping to mend fractured bones. During a class demonstration, a chicken bone is broken by applying a load until it reaches a point of failure (fracture). Then, working as biomedical engineers, students teams design their own splint or cast to help repair a fractured bone, learning about the strength of materials used.
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Engineering for the Three Little Pigs
The purpose of this activity is to demonstrate the importance of rocks, soils and minerals in engineering and how using the right material for the right job is important. The students build three different sand castles and test them for strength and resistance to weathering. Then, they discuss how the buildings are different and what engineers need to think about when using rocks, soils and minerals for construction.
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General Elections
General elections are the final stage in the presidential election process. General elections are held on the Tuesday following the first Monday in November. By the time of the general election, presidential candidates have campaigned for approximately one year and have raised huge sums of money. (Video is narrated with slides and speeches.)
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1.2: Converting to geometric form
In this unit you will see first how to convert vectors from geometric form, in terms of a magnitude and direction, to component form, and then how conversion in the opposite sense is accomplished. The ability to convert between these different forms of a vector is useful in certain problems involving displacement and velocity, as shown in Section 2, in which you will also work with bearings.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

TRMM Rainmap for September 1998: South and Central America
Monthly average rainfall over South and Central America for September 1998 as measured by TRMM. High rainfall rates are in red.
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No Valve in Vain
In this activity, students will design and create their own heart valves out of a variety of materials given to them, including: waterproof tape, plastic tubing, flexible plastic sheets, foam sheets, scissors, clay, etc. This activity will not only test their understanding of how a one-way valve works and its purpose, but will also allow them a chance to think outside of the box and practice engineering problem-solving.
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7.2.4 Using questions

Questions can be used as a means both of persuasion and of control. Repeatedly telling an individual something that they are unwilling to accept is unlikely to get them to change their mind. It is better instead to ask carefully constructed questions that will lead him or her to realise the strength of your case and the weakness of their own. Asking questions gives the questioner more control over the conversation, forcing the other side to respond. Writing down a list of appropriate question
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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University