Gerry Wright on the Michael G Degroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research
Gerry Wright, director of the Michael G Degroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research at McMaster University, talks about the work performed in his lab and by his colleagues.
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Dangerous Air
By tracing the movement of radiation released during an accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, students see how air pollution, like particulate matter, can become a global issue.
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Travel With Care Safety Tip 4
The City of Auburn and Auburn University have partnered to bring Travel With Care Auburn, a public safety campaign aimed at audiences using all forms of transportation: motorists, pedestrians, cyclists, and transit riders. Throughout the week of April 4-8, members of the Auburn Public Safety - Police Division will be patrolling city streets and the Auburn University campus to bring awareness to traffic issues, while student volunteers will pass out informational brochures.
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Understanding Leukemias
This tutorial is designed to aid medical students at all levels understand the laboratory diagnosis of leukemias. It includes introductory material on the basic laboratory tests specific to diagnoses, their general application and pitfalls in interpretation. The introductory material is followed by a series of short clinical vignettes illustrating the major categories of leukemia. This tutorial focuses on diagnosis and relative little on treatment is included. he tutorial concludes with a short
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Sticks and Stones Will Break That Bone!
Students learn about the strength of bones and methods of helping to mend fractured bones. During a class demonstration, a chicken bone is broken by applying a load until it reaches a point of failure (fracture). Then, working as biomedical engineers, students teams design their own splint or cast to help repair a fractured bone, learning about the strength of materials used.
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Engineering for the Three Little Pigs
The purpose of this activity is to demonstrate the importance of rocks, soils and minerals in engineering and how using the right material for the right job is important. The students build three different sand castles and test them for strength and resistance to weathering. Then, they discuss how the buildings are different and what engineers need to think about when using rocks, soils and minerals for construction.
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1.2: Converting to geometric form
In this unit you will see first how to convert vectors from geometric form, in terms of a magnitude and direction, to component form, and then how conversion in the opposite sense is accomplished. The ability to convert between these different forms of a vector is useful in certain problems involving displacement and velocity, as shown in Section 2, in which you will also work with bearings.
Author(s): The Open University

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

TRMM Rainmap for September 1998: South and Central America
Monthly average rainfall over South and Central America for September 1998 as measured by TRMM. High rainfall rates are in red.
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No Valve in Vain
In this activity, students will design and create their own heart valves out of a variety of materials given to them, including: waterproof tape, plastic tubing, flexible plastic sheets, foam sheets, scissors, clay, etc. This activity will not only test their understanding of how a one-way valve works and its purpose, but will also allow them a chance to think outside of the box and practice engineering problem-solving.
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7.2.4 Using questions

Questions can be used as a means both of persuasion and of control. Repeatedly telling an individual something that they are unwilling to accept is unlikely to get them to change their mind. It is better instead to ask carefully constructed questions that will lead him or her to realise the strength of your case and the weakness of their own. Asking questions gives the questioner more control over the conversation, forcing the other side to respond. Writing down a list of appropriate question
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Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution - NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence - see http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/ - Original copyright The Open University

Do as the Romans: Construct an Aqueduct!
In this activity, students work with specified materials to create aqueduct components that will transport 2 liters of water across a short distance in their classroom. The goal is to build an aqueduct that will supply Aqueductis, a Roman city, with clean water for private homes, public baths, and glorious fountains.
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Use of the Question Mark
This student-created animated slide show defines the question mark and explains its use. Bright, vivid slides are accomapnied by upbeat music.         ( 2:14)
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Etiquette
Aan het einde van deze les kunnen cursisten een conversatie voeren die in overeenstemming is met de regels van de etiquette.
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Eco-living
De hoofdgedachten in drie teksten over alternatieve levensstijlen met elkaar vergelijken.
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Chairman and CEO of General Electric Jeffrey Immelt Speech at the College of Charleston
Jeffrey Immelt, current chairman of the board and chief executive officer of the U.S. based conglomerate General Electric, was the keynote speaker on March 24, 2011 for the College of Charleston Friends of the Library's Winthrop Roundtable. Immelt's appearance was the culminating event in the year-long environmental lecture series, "Going Green: Fad or Forever?". Immelt has played an instrumental role in guiding GE's environmental conservation efforts and led efforts for GE in the areas of p
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