5.1.6 Pulling it all together

The electric and magnetic fields given by Equations 7.21 and 7.23 can satisfy all four of Maxwell's equations in empty space. Gauss's law and the no-monopole law are immediately satisfied because the fields are transverse. Faraday's law and the Ampère–Maxwell law will also be satisfied if we can find electric and magnetic fields that obey Equations 7.24 and 7.26.

We are looking for wave-like solutions, so it is sensible to try

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5.1.4 Getting agreement with the no-monopole law

Substituting Equation 7.23 into the no-monopole law gives immediate agreement because

The no-monopole law is analogous to Gauss's law in empty space, and it leads to a similar conclusion: the magnetic wave must be transverse. This has already been established using Farada
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1.4 Decimal places

If you have less than one unit you should put a zero before the decimal point to make it easier for yourself and others to read the value (e.g. you should write 0.4 rather than just .4, as will be explained later in this unit). However, how many zeros should you put after the last whole number in the series? For instance, is 0.4 the same as 0.40?

The short answer is that on one level, it is. However, by writing 0.40 we are saying that there are four tenths and zero hundredths, an
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Introduction

This sample of S110 material is taken from Module 2, entitled Using numbers and handling data. As you read the material, bear in mind that it is taken from a work-based course, designed for those who are employed in the health services, perhaps as a paramedic or as operating theatre staff. If you were a student on the course, you would have an OU tutor to help you, plus a work-based mentor supplied by the employer – normally the NHS. The aim is to use the workplace as a teaching aren
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Acknowledgements

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions). This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

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4.5 How wide were the oceans?

Once evidence has been found to prove the existence of an ancient ocean, is it possible to calculate its maximum width? Palaeomagnetic studies can give geologists an idea of the palaeolatitude (N–S) of the ocean but not its palaeolongtitude (E–W), so depending on its orientation, an indication of how wide it was may not be possible. However, an approximate indication of how wide the former oceans were can be obtained by examining the fossil faunal assemblages that are present (e.g.
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3 Appendix: Some highlights of physics

c. 624 BC Birth of Thales of Miletus: traditionally ‘the first physicist’.
384 BC Birth of Aristotle: author of Physics.
1543 Nicolaus Copernicus' De Revolutionibus Orbium Celestium.
1600 William Gilbert's De Magnete describing the behaviour of
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3.4.1 Alarm arousal

A potentially life-threatening event, such as a fall in T a to below zero, elicits a transient metabolic response in a hibernator. If the lowered temperature is maintained, the animal responds not just with transient increases in metabolism, but with a sustained rise in T b and complete arousal.

Mechanical stimuli as well as temperature changes can evoke arousal. In animals fitted with electrodes just under the skin to monitor muscle action potentials
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4 From DNA to RNA: transcription

In the process of transcription, the information in a gene, i.e. the DNA base sequence, is copied, or transcribed, to form an RNA molecule. RNA is therefore an intermediary in the flow of information from DNA to protein. Before we consider the details of transcription, we will first look at the structure of RNA.

The name ribonucleic acid suggests that RNA is chemically related to DNA. Like DNA, RNA is a chain of nucleotides.

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2 One gene–one protein

A gene is a short section of a long DNA double helix molecule, which comprises a linear sequence of base pairs.

SAQ 1

What is the basic (primary) structure of a protein?

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1.1.3 Genetic testing of children

Within clinical genetic services, a difference has grown up between the testing of children and the testing of adults. Sometimes the genetic testing of children is relatively uncontroversial. For example, the genetic test may simply be to confirm a medical diagnosis that has been made on clinical grounds. So a three-year-old with low weight, blocked lungs and poor digestion may be given a genetic test to see whether they have CF or not.

There are other cases where a test is used predict
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7 Glossary

Open glossary now...


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5.2 Neural ageing: article 2

In the article presented here by Esteban (2004) entitled ‘Living with the enemy: a physiological role for theβ-amyloid peptide’, Trends in Neurosciences, 27, pp. 1–3, the author introduces us to a very important molecule implicated in the aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. However, the β-am
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4 Why do social workers need to know about the law?

From our discussion of social work and the meaning of law you will already have some answers to this question. We will now bring them together and relate them to wider debates about the content of the social work curriculum.

We have seen that there are few right answers in social work. However, if practitioners do not know where they stand legally they cannot begin to do their job properly because they will not be able to give appropriate advice and support to service users. They will a
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3.5 The language of law

A potential barrier to understanding, which those new to law can find off-putting, is the use of specialist terminology. This contributes to the perception of law as an elitist and difficult area of study and is something that requires further explanation. Many professions (and social groups) develop their own forms of language to communicate effectively and, in some cases, to signify group membership. In this sense legal language is not unique, but is does have a formal character which can s
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should:

  • be able to describe the relationship between social work practice and the law;

  • understand the legal framework that regulates social work in Scotland;

  • have an awareness of the role of law in countering discrimination.


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2.1 Treaties, conventions and constitutions

International human rights are part of a much wider area, public international law, which in broad terms encompasses law relating to the legal rights, duties and powers of one nation state in relation to its dealings with other nation states. These rights, duties and powers are set out in international treaties or conventions. Such treaties and conventions may be global in their application or restricted to certain regions of the world. Reference to a work on international human rights treati
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3.3.1 Try some yourself

1 A friend has been quoted a price of £25.50 per square yard for tarmac surfacing of his yard. The yard measures 6 yards by 10 feet. Here is his calculation of the total cost. What is wrong with it?

cost = £25.50 × 6 × 10 = £1530


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1.9.4 Video task: Taking the A train

Now watch the video.

Video, Click to watch part two

Download this video clip.