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Building and Maintaining the Common Ground in Web-Based Interaction
In this paper, the main purpose is to explore how participants establish and maintain the common ground in the computer-based conferences. Previous studies assume that before the participants can reach the deeper level interaction and learning, they have to gain an adequate level of common ground (Dillenbourg, 1999; Baker et al., 1999; Veerman, 2000). Subjects were 68 pre-service teachers and 7 mentors from three universities who participated in the web-based conferencing course for eight weeks.
Author(s): Mäkitalo Kati,Häkkinen Päivi,Salo Piritta,Järv

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Cooperation scripts for learning via web-based discussion boards and videoconferencing
Computer-supported collaborative learning often means that locally distant learners discuss a task via text-based discussion boards or videoconferencing. Collaborative learning, however, is often suboptimal with respect to how learners work on the concepts that are supposed to be learned and how learners interact with each other. Collaborative learning environments may be improved by scripts that structure epistemic activities and social interactions of learners. Two studies are being reported t
Author(s): Weinberger Armin,Ertl Bernhard,Fischer Frank,Mandl

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Intelligent CALL: The magnitude of the task
The quality of most CALL programs is not well balanced with respect to the use of computer technology and of language content and processing. This imbalance can be explained by a number of constraints pulling CALL developers in diverging directions. For commercial CALLware the poor learner fit and lack of feedback is a serious impediment. So far ICALL approaches trying to overcome this have not been of a sufficiently high quality due to the vast distance between most learner language and the tex
Author(s): Tschichold Cornelia

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Learning Bridges: a role for mobile technologies in education
A project called MyArtSpace, funded by the UK Department for Culture Media and Sport, is today exploring how children can engage in similar enquiry-led learning supported by mobile technology and how this can link to school and home learning. Using MyArtSpace as an example, we discuss the possibilities for mobile technology to form bridges between formal and informal learning. We also offer guidelines, drawn from our experience with MyArtSpace, for designing such bridges.
Author(s): Vavoula Giasemi,Sharples Mike,Rudman Paul,Lonsdale

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Anchored Interactive Learning Environments
Advances in computer technology and multi-media systems have led to widespread interest in computer-based instruction and learning environments. The use of video, animation, graphics, and simulation allow the presentation of material in realistic contexts, thus addressing the problems of inert knowledge while promoting constructive and generative learning. But the true potential and benefits of these systems are yet to be realized. Cognitive studies on learning and transfer suggest that concepts
Author(s): Crews Thaddeus R.,Biswas Gautam,Goldman Susan,Bran

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Implementation of a computer algebra based assessment system
This article describes the design and implementation of the CABLE computer aided assessment system. Introducing a computer algebra system (CAS) to assist in marking allows instructors to design effective assessment schemes that are valid and reliable. A modular design approach allows system components, including a virtual learning environment (VLE), CAS and database, to be used for their respective strengths. Requirements for both interoperability and customisation for particular learning contex
Author(s): Naismith Laura,Sangwin Christopher J

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Cognitive processes in solving variants of computer-based problems used in logic teaching
The effect of two instructional variables, visualisation and manipulation of objects, in learning to use the logical connective, conditional, was investigated. Instructions for 66 first-year social science students were varied in the computer-based learning environment Tarski's World, designed for teaching first-order logic (Barwise & Etchemendy, 1992. The language of first-order logic: including the Microsoft Windows program Tarski's World 4.0 for use with IBM-compatible computers. Stanford, CA
Author(s): Eysink Tessa,Dijkstra Sanne,Kuper Jan

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When less is sometimes more: Optimal learning conditions are required for schema acquisition from mu
While it is usually claimed that multiple examples for the illustration of problem categories are a necessary prerequisite for schema acquisition, there is a lack of conclusive empirical evidence supporting this claim. Moreover, there are findings indicating that carefully designed one-example conditions may allow for profitable processes of example comparison as well. In line with this reasoning, we present an experiment – that builds up on a series of studies conducted by Quilici and Mayer (1
Author(s): Scheiter Katharina,Gerjets Peter

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Cognitive tools for discovery learning
Cognitive tools, defined here as instruments that support or perform cognitive processes for learners in order to support learning, can bridge the difference between open learning environments, like discovery learning environments and traditional supportive instructional environments. This article discusses a definition of the concept of cognitive tool and its use in learning. Two examples of cognitive tools for discovery environments are presented, and it is made clear how these tools can serve
Author(s): Van Joolingen Wouter

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Towards Web 2.0 Schools: Rethinking the Teachers Professional Development
This paper aims at analyzing the Web 2.0 based distance education in the K-12 schools as an emerging phenomenon that catalyzes a new educational reform all over the world. Some pre-Web 2.0 best practice examples are analyzed in order to draw the main findings in the paper. The teacher’s professional qualification designed to meet the new challenges is considered as a key problem for a successful penetration of this phenomenon in the schools. It is emphasized on the importance of designing a lif
Author(s): Nikolov Roumen

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Challenges of implementing CSCL designs in the Greek classrooms
not available,Paper presented at the 10th Biennial Conference of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI), 2003, Padova, Italy.
Author(s): Kollias Vassilis,Mamalougos Nectarios,Vamvakoussi

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Computer support for collaborative learning: foundations for a CSCL community
Proceedings of CSCL 2002 Boulder, Colorado, USA January 7-11, 2002
Author(s): Stahl Gerry

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A Framework for Assessing Self, Peer and Group Performance in e-Learning
In this chapter we propose a framework that supports the analysis and assessment of collaborative learning of online groups of students working on a complex task (software project, or case study) in a real web-based, distance learning context. On the one hand, our approach is based on principled evaluation criteria that involve and measure a variety of elements and factors as well as on a combination of a basic qualitative process and a quantitative method that provide a grounded and holistic fr
Author(s): Daradoumis Thanasis,Xhafa Fatos,Juan Perez A.

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Enabling Efficient Real Time User Modeling in On-line Campus
User modelling in on-line distance learning is an important research field focusing on two important aspects: describing and predicting students’ actions and intentions as well as adapting the learning process to students’ features, habits, interests, preferences, and so on. The aim is to greatly stimulate and improve the learning experience. In this context, user modeling implies a constant processing and analysis of user interaction data during long-term learning activities, which produces l
Author(s): Caballé Santi,Xhafa Fatos,Daradoumis Thanasis,Fer

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Collaboration Activity Function: An interaction analysis’ tool for Computer Supported Collaborative
During the last years, an increased interest has been observed on tools analyzing collaborative interactions that could be useful for researchers, teachers, or even students. The paper presents such a tool, based on the formally defined collaborative activity function (CAF). The empirical evaluation of CAF is also presented. The evaluation is focused on teachers using CAF during and after sessions of synchronous collaborative problem solving among students.
Author(s): Fessakis George,Petrou Argyroula,Dimitracopoulou A

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Enabling Students to Construct Theories of Collaborative Inquiry and Reflective Learning: Computer S
To develop lifelong learning skills, we argue that students need to learn how to learn via inquiry and understand the sociocognitive and metacognitive processes that are involved. We illustrate how software could play a central role in enabling students to develop such expertise. Our hypothesis is that sociocognitive systems, such as those needed for collaborative inquiry and reflective learning, can best be understood as a community of interacting agents, who each have expertise in accomplishin
Author(s): White Barbara Y.,Shimoda Todd A.,Frederiksen John

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Verbal and Nonverbal communication in computer mediated settings
The paper discusses the verbal and nonverbal communication during a video-recorded meeting between two physically separate teams as part of a 9 month multi-site construction project. In the extract analysed here, the team which was video-recorded contained three members and the project coordinator, whereas the remote team contained a single individual. Communication between the two teams was by means of telephone and shared computer meeting system. The video-recorded team used nonverbal communic
Author(s): Rosenberg Duska,Sillince John A.A.

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ActiveMath: A Generic and Adaptive Web-Based Learning Environment
ActiveMath is a generic web-based learning system that dynamically generates interactive (mathematical) courses adapted to the student's goals, preferences, capabilities, and knowledge. The content is presented in a semantic XML-based format. For each user, the appropriate content is retrieved from a knowledge base and the course is generated individually according to pedagogical rules. Then the course is presented to the user via a standard web-browser. One of the exceptional features of Active
Author(s): Melis Erica,Andres Eric,Budenbender Jochen,Frischa

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Simulating Human Tutor Dialog Moves in AutoTutor
This purpose of this paper is to show how prevalent features of successful human tutoring interactions can be integrated into a pedagogical agent, AutoTutor. AutoTutor is a fully automated computer tutor that responds to learner input by simulating the dialog moves of effective, normal human tutors. AutoTutorâs delivery of dialog moves is organized within a 5-step framework that is unique to normal human tutoring interactions. We assessed AutoTutorâs performance as an effective tutor and conve
Author(s): Person Natalie K.,Graesser Arthur C.,Kreuz Roger J

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Adaptive and Intelligent Web-based Educational Systems
daptive and intelligent Web-based educational systems (AIWBES) provide an alternative to the traditional “just-put-it-on-the-Web” approach in the development of Web-based educational courseware (Brusilovsky & Miller, 2001). AIWBES attempt to be more adaptive by building a model of the goals, preferences and knowledge of each individual student and using this model throughout the interaction with the student in order to adapt to the needs of that student. They also attempt to be more intelligen
Author(s): Brusilovsky Peter,Peylo Christoph

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