Econometría
La econometría se ha convertido en una herramienta fundamental en el análisis económico. Hace ya casi 90 años Joseph Schumpeter afirmaba que "todo economista, le guste o no, es un económetra, ya que necesita tratar de explicar sus argumentos con cifras" y desde entonces la popularidad de los modelos econométricos se ha ido incrementando gracias al aumento de la información estadística y al desarrollo de software estadístico-econométrico.En la actualidad los modelos econométricos son u
Author(s): ANA JESUS LOPEZ MENENDEZ,BLANCA MORENO CUARTAS,RIG

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Shifting tectonic plates of global power
Mark Spelman, Global Head of Strategy at Accenture, explains why you need to look at the world through a multiple lens
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The 2010 W-2s are in the mail
Your 2010 W-2 has been mailed to your current address (typically your home address) on file with Human Resources. The W‐2 HelpLine is available again this year to assist you with questions or problems at 322-3100 (2-3100 on campus.) Please allow the U.S. Postal Service until Feb. 1 to deliver your W‐2 before requesting akeep reading »
Author(s): Vanderbilt News Service

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5.1 Critical questions
Reading is an essential skill for all of us and developing our skills in reading is a good investment. This unit is packed with practical activities which are aimed at making reading more enjoyable and rewarding. This unit also includes sections on how to read actively and critically.
Author(s): The Open University

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9.6.2 Adapt your strategy to overcome difficulties and produce the quality of outcomes required

When you begin to put everything together you may realise you need to go back and find out about things you had not initially considered or just take more time to get things set up. Going backwards and forwards through the stages like this is quite usual, and for complex work or assignments you may need to build in extra time for it.

Use the group to help you identify the reasons for any difficulties and consider the effect of any changes in circumstances, such as availability of resour
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9.5 Monitoring progress

Monitoring progress is about keeping track of how the work with others is going, making sure you are ‘on task’ and ‘on time’. You need to know how to monitor progress in managing a group activity and being a team member. This will involve considering the relationships within the group and managing the quality of the work by using the checkpoints to review the progress towards your goals and outcomes.

Monitoring progress in working with others involves you considering y
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Learning outcomes

Having studied this unit you should be able to set skills targets and provide evidence that you have met these in the following areas:

  • own learning and performance;

  • communication;

  • information technology;

  • information literacy;

  • application of number;

  • problem solving;

  • working with others.

5.3 The rebound effect

When individuals or organisations implement energy efficiency improvements, they usually save money as well as saving energy. However, if the money saved is then spent on higher standards of service, or additional energy-consuming activities that would not have otherwise been undertaken, then some or all of the energy savings may be eliminated. This tendency is sometimes known as the ‘rebound effect’. For example, if householders install improved insulation or a more efficient heating boi
Author(s): The Open University

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1.3 Wider aspects of business and company law

So far, we have touched on just a few of the many aspects of the law which relates to companies and other businesses. It will be useful at this point to consider how these areas fit into some wider issues raised by the study of law in general. For example:

  • The law relating to businesses such as companies and partnerships regulates important areas of daily life, and allows you to see that there is a connection between the law and the way in which people
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • appreciate how chemical processes in the rest of the world affect the Arctic environment and the species inhabiting it;

  • recognise the physical processes that determine atmosphere and oceanic flows in the Arctic;

  • appreciate the scientific research process and the use of scientific evidence;

  • use quantitative scientific evidence to examine the link between atmospheric carbon dioxide levels a
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Introduction

The scientific theory of plate tectonics suggests that at least some of these Arctic lands were once tropical. Since then the continents have moved and ice has changed the landscape. This unit will concentrate on evidence from the last 800,000 years using information collected from ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica, and will use this evidence to discuss current and possible future climate. The cores show that there have been nine periods in the recent past when large areas of the Earth
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San Ildefonso bowl
"Black, highly polished undecorated bowl. Signature on bottom "Maria & Santana" Condition: Excellent"-- From the Museum catalog.,Gift by John A. Morgan, 2002
Author(s): Martínez, María Montoya,Martinez, Santana

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3.2 Stationary states and scattering in one dimension
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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3.1 Overview
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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2.2 Wave packets and scattering in one dimension
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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1 What are scattering and tunnelling?
Scattering is fundamental to almost everything we know about the world, such as why the sky is blue. Tunnelling is entirely quantum-mechanical and gives rise to such phenomena as nuclear fusion in stars. Examples and applications of both these fascinating concepts are investigated in this unit.
Author(s): The Open University

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Next Steps
This unit is intended to develop your understanding of Newtonian mechanics in relation to oscillating systems. In addition to a basic grounding in calculus, this unit assumes that you have some understanding of how to solve second-order linear constant-coefficient differential equations; how to take the dot product of two vectors; of solving statics problems; and of applying Newton's second law to mechanical problems.
Author(s): The Open University

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1 Modelling with differential equations: oscillations
This unit is intended to develop your understanding of Newtonian mechanics in relation to oscillating systems. In addition to a basic grounding in calculus, this unit assumes that you have some understanding of how to solve second-order linear constant-coefficient differential equations; how to take the dot product of two vectors; of solving statics problems; and of applying Newton's second law to mechanical problems.
Author(s): The Open University

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Next Steps
This unit lays the foundation of the subject of mechanics. Mechanics is concerned with how and why objects stay put, and how and why they move. In particular, this unit - Modelling Static Problems - considers why objects stay put. And it assumes that you have a good working knowledge of vectors.
Author(s): The Open University

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