Bush Cites Need to Develop Affordable Hydrogen-Powered Fuel Cells
In his State of the Union Address on January 28, 2003, President Bush made a case for further fuel cell development. Current efforts in this area have not determined how to efficiently produce or extract hydrogen for the cells. In hopes of solving this problem, Bush proposed a $1.2 billion FreedomFUEL initiative. The first site discusses the initiative and its potential to create a nearly pollution-free method of electricity generation.
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QuickMath: Automatic Math Solutions
QuickMath is one of the most useful sites for common but tedious mathematical calculations. It is a free "online calculator that solves equations and does all sorts of algebra and calculus problems." Separated into many different functional sections, this handy tool can simplify expressions, evaluate symbolic integrals, plot equations, and much more. When inputting a problem into QuickMath for it to solve, users have an option to use basic or advanced controls depending on the problem's intricac
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Barbie bungee
In this lesson, students model a bungee jump for a Barbie doll. They collect data in a table (number of rubber bands and jump distance), then create a scatterplot of the data, find its line of best fit, and write an equation of that line. Students go on to analyze the equation, noting its slope in relation to the data collected, and the meaning of the y-intercept. Since the distance to which the doll will fall is directly proportional to the number of rubber bands, the lesson provides a scenario
Author(s): Samuel E. Zordak

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Early Algebra, Early Arithmetic
This site offers a variety of early algebra resources for teachers in grades 1-6, parents, researchers, policy makers, administrators, and curriculum developers. Site includes early algebra activities, handouts and overheads in PDF format (requires Acrobat Reader), articles, short reviews of articles and books focusing on early math and early algebra, news and events, and more. A valuable source for pre algebra activities in the elementary classroom.
Author(s): National Science Foundation (NSF),TERC

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Better buses
How can city buses be made to run more quietly and produce less pollution? This article, part of a series about the future of energy, discusses the use of hydrogen-powered buses in Chicago and Vancouver. Students read about plans to place hydrogen-powered buses in six of the world's smoggiest cities and the potential for reduced air pollution. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse
Author(s): Iowa Public Television. Explore More Project

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Copyright 2004, Iowa Public Television.

Whats It Like Where You Live? Desert
This site provides excellent background information on deserts. Large print and superb pictures make this site very appealing to younger students. Topics include: What is a Desert Like?, Types of Deserts, What causes Deserts?, Deserts of the World, Desert Plants, Desert Animals, and links to other desert sites.
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Copyright 2002, Missouri Botanical Garden

Positive Linear Function Machine
This activity allows the user to explore simple linear functions; the function is determined by looking for patterns in the outputs.
Author(s): The Shodor Education Foundation, Inc.

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Ice Cube of Exotic Microbes
This article describes a permafrost subglacial lake discovered beneath Antarctica. The lake offers scientists a chance to test their sterile drilling techniques before exploring elsewhere in search of exotic microbes. Techniques that avoid contaminating a drill site with microbes, suggests the author, would prove useful for future drilling into Mars polar caps in search of life.
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Copyright 2009, Astrobio.net

What is sugar?
This reading, part of a site about the science of cooking, provides general scientific information about sucrose (white table sugar) together with explanations of the science behind some candy-making procedures. The general information includes the chemical formula of sucrose and a ball-and-stick model that illustrates that sucrose is made of fructose and glucose. Regarding candy, the reading describes how heating a sugar solution produces a supersaturated solution. A discussion about common tec
Author(s): Exploratorium

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Copyright Exploratorium.

Energy and work
What is the difference between energy and work? This reading, part of a series about the future of energy, introduces students to the connection between energy and work. The page defines work and gives several examples of the relationship between work and energy. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse
Author(s): Iowa Public Television. Explore More Project

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Copyright 2004, Iowa Public Television.

Pythagorean puzzle
This web page offers basic illustrated information about Pythagoras and the famous equation he and his followers are credited with developing. The page contains a link to an applet that demonstrates the meaning of the equation. From the applet, links to three problems show the equation's application in baseball, scaling a wall, and in construction. This web page requires the student know what a right triangle is and how area is measured. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse
Author(s): WGBH Science Unit

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Copyright 1997 WGBH.

Observe solar eclipses
This Earth science animation helps students compare three types of solar eclipses: total, partial, and annular. The introduction explains how the type of eclipse is determined by variations in distance and alignment between the Earth, sun, and moon. The animation follows the events of all three eclipses concurrently. Movie controls allow students to repeat, pause, or step through the animation, which can give students more time to compare the eclipse sequences. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National
Author(s): TERC. Center for Earth and Space Science Education

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Science 101 : How Do Microscopes Work?
Microscopes allow scientists to examine everyday objects in extraordinary ways. They provide high-resolution images that show objects in fine detail. This articles includes details on how microscopes work and how they enhance the scientific process.
Author(s): Sarah Zimov

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Permission to reproduce content is granted in advance under the following circumstances: (1) All educators may reproduce up to five copies of an NSTA article for personal use only. This does not inclu

Observe a visual model of Earth's spheres
This Earth science resource enables students to view Earth's four spheres--the geosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere. The visualization is introduced by a paragraph that defines the four spheres. Below the paragraph, there is an image of a globe that a viewer can animate by clicking on it. The globe separates into four globes, each of which shows one sphere and is labeled with the appropriate sphere name. The animation contains a legend to explain the color coding used. Controls allo
Author(s): TERC. Center for Earth and Space Science Education

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EdWeb
This hypertext book by Andy Carvin includes chapters on the role of the Web in education, a crash course in HTML, history and explanations of the Internet, educational reform and information technology, successful case studies, and K-12 resources on the net.
Author(s): Andy Carvin

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How are Earth's spheres interacting?
This Earth science investigation leads students through a brief introduction of the spheres of the Earth and an exploration of the interactions among the spheres. The seven-step investigation incorporates a mixture of informational text, questions, and images. After reading about and interacting with an image of the four main spheres (the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere), students are introduced to the concept of sphere interactions as part of the larger Earth system. Text, que
Author(s): TERC. Center for Earth and Space Science Education

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Ebola infection reported
This article describes cases and outbreaks of Ebola virus. The focus is on how little is known about Ebola and Marberg viruses, especially about how certain people survive those infections. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse
Author(s): Sean Henahan

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All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright 1994-2005 by Access Excellence the National Health Museum.

Ecological Footprint: Overshoot
In this two-minute sound segment, the director of the Sustainability Program for the public policy group Redefining Progress discusses the concept of your ecological footprint. This is the amount of nature it takes to support your lifestyle. He says that if we use more than can be replaced by nature we are in a condition called overshoot. He suggests that this can continue for a while but eventually someone will have to pay with a lower standard of living. This site is from an archive of a daily
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Copyright 2002 Jim Metzner Productions, Inc. All rights reserved.

Seed Dispersal 101
This two-minute radio program introduces listeners to the variety of agents that disperse seeds. The program's guest, a plant biologist, cites examples of nonliving and living dispersal agents that include the wind, water, and such animals as birds and bats. He also explains that a plant's fruits or seeds often offer clues about how they are dispersed. The program, which is available here in audio and text, is the first in a series about seed dispersal. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearin
Author(s): Pulse of the Planet

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Copyright 2004 Jim Metzner Productions, Inc. All rights reserved.

Etymologies of Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry
What are the origins and roots of the words geometry, algebra, and trigonometry?
Author(s): Math Forum,Nikki

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