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References

Durant, J., Bauer, M., Gaskell, G., Midden, C., Liakopoulos, M. and Scholten, L. (2000) ‘Two cultures of public understanding of science andtechnology in Europe’ in Dierkes, M. and Von Grote, C. (eds) Between Understanding and Trust: the Public, Science and Technology, Amsterdam: Harwood Academic Publishers.
Eurobarometer
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4.3 Phenotypic changes that appeared without being selected

As well as these behavioural changes, many of the selected foxes had unusual white markings (Figures 13c and d). The first colour change that the Russian investigators noted in their foxes was a white ‘star’ on the forehead similar to that of other domesticated mammals (Author(s): The Open University

2.6 End-of-unit questions

Question 1

What is the approximate wavelength range (in metres) of microwaves?

2 Inside the Sun

To account for its brightness and activity, the Sun must contain a power source. However, the nature of that power source was a great puzzle in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Fossil records and ideas about evolution were beginning to provide firm evidence that the Earth must be at least hundreds of millions of years old, rather than thousands of years as was previously thought, and the Sun must be at least as old as the Earth. The only fuels known at the time were coal, wood, o
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2.5 Tree squirrels

Coevolution also underpins the relationship between many tree squirrels and the trees that house them. The creation of food caches as a ‘winter-larder’ is mutually beneficial, partly because squirrels are sufficiently profligate in their habits to ensure that many stores are overlooked. Stealing by neighbours is so common that such over-provision may be essential – it's not through forgetfulness or lack of skill; grey squirrels appear able to detect nuts buried as deep as 30 cm below th
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5.3 Hindgut fermenters

The odd-toed ungulates (comprising the order Perissodactyla), the horses, tapirs and rhinoceroses, are hindgut fermenters, as are elephants. Update Table 2 with this information. These animals have a relatively simple, small undivided stomach, but this time an even larger caecum and colon where the microbes are housed and whe
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3.1 Introduction

How evolution proceeds is obviously of central importance when studying mammals. Of fundamental importance to the way evolution works is the notion of natural selection, and in S182_3 Studying mammals: chisellers I'll be talking about what most researchers regard as this ‘single most important idea in biology’. But before that, I want to describe some of the adaptations evident in insect eaters.

From your reading of LoM you'll appreciate that natural selection promotes the ev
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5.3 The redshift of the 3 K radiation

The temperature, T, of the radiation is proportional to the most probable photon energy, E, which as we have said is proportional to f, and hence inversely proportional to the wavelength λ. Thus,

According to Equation 1, we have for the redshift, z


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4.2 Evidence for a big bang

Having interpreted the redshift as indicating a recessional speed proportional to distance, one may extrapolate into the future to predict how the positions of the galaxies will evolve with time. One can also run the sequence backwards, so to speak, to discuss what their positions were in the past. Clearly, at former times the galaxies were closer to each other.

But not only that. Because of the proportional relationship between speed and distance (Equation 6), at a certain time in the
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3.2 Some general properties of galaxies

Firstly, we note that galaxies tend to occur in clusters rather than singly. The mutual gravitational attraction of galaxies naturally tends to hold them on paths that remain close to each other. Typically a cluster contains tens or hundreds of galaxies. There are, however, large clusters with thousands of galaxies, and there are some solitary galaxies. Our own Galaxy is a member of a smallish cluster of about 36 galaxies called the Local Group (see Author(s): The Open University

1 Introducing cosmology

General relativity has a very different conceptual basis from that of Newtonian mechanics. Its success in accounting for the precession of Mercury's orbit, and the bending of light by massive objects like the Sun, gives us confidence that our picture of space and time should be Einstein's rather than Newton's. In this and the following units, we turn our attention to the study of the large-scale structure of spacetime. We see how spacetime as a whole is curved by the gross distribution of mas
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5.1.5 Getting agreement with the Ampère–Maxwell law

Finally, our electric and magnetic fields must satisfy the Ampère–Maxwell law in empty space. Using Equations 7.21 and 7.23, we obtain

which requires that

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4.5 Endocrine disruptors

Then he was a she…

(Lou Reed, American rock singer)

In 1996, a book called Our Stolen Future was published, bringing to public attention a debate that had been simmering among biologists for some time. Written by Theo Colborn and two colleagues at the World Wildlife Fund (WWF), this book presented the hypothesis that certain industrial chemicals, commonly found as environmental pol
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3.2 The impact of climate change on global freshwater resources

The availability of freshwater will be significantly altered in a future world affected by climate change (Houghton, 2004). In some regions, water availability will decrease; in others it will increase. Precise predictions about the extent and exact location of such changes cannot be made because they are based on climate models, the accuracy of which is uncertain. However, there is wide agreement that probable changes will include:

  • More rain in north
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Introduction

This unit examines why water shortages are predicted as a result of the world's growing population and the importance of access to clean and safe drinking water in public health. It looks at the distribution of water throughout the world and problems with contamination, topics of wide general interest.

Introducing health sciences: a case study approachI (SDK125)


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3.6.1 Radioactivity and bugs!

Many natural processes involve repeated doublings or halving at regular intervals. You may have come across this already in your work, in the context of bacterial growth or radioactivity. In this section, we are going to look in more detail at bacterial growth and radioactivity and we will be using graphs to examine how the numbers of bacteria or numbers of radioactive atoms change over time.


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3.2.2 Choice of scale

It's important to choose a scale that covers the range of values you have recorded for that particular axis. If the scale is too big, then all of your measurements will be bunched up at one end of the graph, making it difficult to read. It is also very important to keep the scale consistent all along the axis, i.e. don't suddenly change the spacing between the units of measurement on an axis.


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7 Unit questions

Now you have completed this unit, try the following questions to test your understanding of this material.

Question 19

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