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Introduction

This course extends the ideas introduced in the course on first-order differential equations to a particular type of second-order differential equation which has a variety of applications. The course assumes that you have previously had a basic grounding in calculus, know something about first-order differential equations and have some familiarity with complex numbers.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of level 2 study in Author(s): The Open University

The Finance Crisis: Part Five
Melody Barnes, Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy at the White House, speaks with Robin Harding, U.S. Economics Editor for the Financial Times, about the strategies behind the Obama administration's policies for economic recovery at The Finance Crisis: Lessons Learned from Canada and the Way Forward conference at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, D.C.
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3.2.1 Try some yourself

Activity 37

Introduction

Consciousness is at once the most important and most baffling aspect of the mind. It is the very heart of our existence yet it is extraordinarily difficult to describe and explain. This unit introduces consciousness, and the ‘hard problem’ it presents for a science of the mind.

This study unit is an adapted extract from the Open University course AA308 Thought and experience: themes in the philosophy of mind, which is no longer taught by the University. If you want to
Author(s): The Open University

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3.9 Being on the receiving end

Case Study 2: The Cameron family

David and Marie Cameron, a married couple in their 40s, live in a middle-class suburb. Marie teaches French at the local secondary school, while David is a full-time official for a clerical workers’ union. Both are active in the local Labour
Author(s): The Open University

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Introduction

Active galaxies provide a prime example of high-energy processes operating in the Universe. This course introduces the evidence for activity from the spectra of some galaxies, and the concept of a compact active galactic nucleus as a unifying model for the observed features of several types of active galaxy. It also develops the key skill of applying arithmetic and simple algebra to solving scientific problems.

This OpenLearn course is an adapted extract from the Open University course
Author(s): The Open University

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3.6 Oil industry in Scotland

Photographs can solicit powerful emotional responses and are often used to draw people's attention to issues or to raise awareness of demands. This course takes a look at how one set of photographs, used as part of a particular demand, was created. It looks at the process of producing images by exploring a series of photographs made with the intention of affecting the way a globalised industry is seen and understood. The industry in question is the oil industry based in Aberdeen, on Scotland'
Author(s): The Open University

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Reducing your ecological footprint
Concerned about your impact on the environment? Interested in learning how to shape a more sustainable future? This album shows you simple ways to adapt your lifestyle and how to think globally. Five video tracks demonstrate how to assess the ‘ecological footprint’ of your household, examine the effects of personal transport on the environment, and explore how your decisions as food consumers are part of a supply chain stretching across Europe and the rest of the world. They feature an energ
Author(s): The iTunes U team

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Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see http://www.open.ac.uk/conditions terms and conditions), this content is made available under a http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2

Why Does Helium Change Your Voice?
Why does sucking on helium make your voice sound funny? See if this question can stump Dr. Charlotte Grayson. Helium is a colorless and odorless gas, and lighter than air.  It changes your voice by altering the environment where sounds are formed. Run time 01:27.
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6.4 The principle of proportionality

This principle has been developed and refined by the ECJ and is also covered by Article 5 EC:

Any action of the Community shall not go beyond what is necessary to achieve the objectives of this Treaty.

However, given that the objectives of the Community are defined very widely in Article 2 EC, the principle of proportionality is not always the easiest tool for curbing EU legislative enthusiasm.
Author(s): The Open University

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The week ahead: Outgoing presidents
President Obama gives his final State of the Union address, Taiwan votes for a new president and The European Commission questions Poland's press and legal freedoms
Author(s): The Economist

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4.3 Character code functions

Many programming languages provide two functions associated with the character codes (see Table 2). We shall call these functions ASC and CHR. ASC takes a character as input, and returns the integer giving the ASCII code of the input character. CHR returns the character whose ASCII code is the input integ
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BLOSSOMS - Out For Shopping - Understanding Data Structures
BLOSSOMS - shopping - Understanding Data Structures uploaded 2016feb10
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Virología
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Author(s): María Teresa Cubo Sánchez

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2.1 Unfamiliar words

Salim, Erin, Lewis and Kate all mentioned various difficulties encountered as they read the Layard article. Perhaps your experience was similar. If so, how did you respond? Was your progress held up, or did you manage to keep going? With lots of reading to do, it is important to have ways of finding your way round the obstacles you encounter.

Kate was put off by the word ‘paradox’ and Erin did not know what ‘marginal tax’ meant. I, too, noted down ‘real income’, ‘norm’,
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6.4.1 Implications

What does this all imply for decision making? First, the importance of control perceptions to decision makers' perceptions of risk suggests an important source of bias. In a study of managers' risk taking, Zur Shapira (1995) found that managers would often discount risks on the basis that they felt they could control them. In my own research on traders' decision making, I found traders to suffer from control illusions and their risk judgement and performance to suffer in consequence: illusory
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2 Creationism in disguise

In recent years, creationists have re-branded their hypothesis as 'intelligent design', which asserts that the apparently designed fit of organisms to their conditions of life necessarily implies the existence of an intelligent designer. This idea is no more than the old 'argument from design', promulgated most famously by William Paley in his fable of chancing upon a watch and inferring a watchmaker, which the theory of evolution by natural selection refutes, as brilliantly explained by Rich
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10 Hold that space!

The caesura is the stress which falls at a moment of silence. It's the equivalent of a musical rest and is usually delineated by punctuation. Composers and poets recognise the importance of the space between notes.

The house that Jack or Jill might build

We know that poems

are made of lines

and lines need line-

breaks,

which we've already discussed.<
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Introduction

This unit is an adapted extract from the course Pure mathematics (M208)

The idea of vectors and conics may be new to you. In this unit we look at some of the ways that we represent points, lines and planes in mathematics.

In Section 1 we revise coordinate geometry in two-dimensional Euclidean space,
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