1.5.3 Sedimentary strata

We've seen that the detective work of piecing together a part of Earth's history from sedimentary rocks involves detailed investigation of rock samples, but this can give only a partial picture. On the larger scale of a rock exposure, there can be plenty for us to see and to interpret. Sedimentary rocks are usually found as layers referred to as strata (Author(s): The Open University

1.5.2 Sedimentary processes

Sedimentary grains are formed when the rocks at the Earth's surface are slowly broken up physically by exposure to wind and frost, and decomposed (chemically) by rainwater or biological action. These processes are collectively termed weathering. Once a rock has been broken up by weathering, the small rock fragments and individual mineral grains can be eroded from their place of origin by water, wind or glaciers and transported to be deposited elsewhere as roughly horizontal layers of sediment
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1.6.5 RSS

RSS (‘Really Simple Syndication’ or ‘Rich Site Summary’) newsfeeds supply headlines, links, and article summaries from various websites. By using RSS ‘feedreader’ software you can gather together a range of feeds and read them in one place: they come to you, rather than you having to go out and look for breaking news. The range of RSS feeds on offer is growing daily. There is probably a feed to cover all aspects of your life where you might need the latest information, and you may
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1.4.4 O is for Objectivity

One of the characteristics of ‘good’ information is that it should be balanced and present both sides of an argument or issue. This way the reader is left to weigh up the evidence and make a decision. In reality, we recognise that no information is truly objective.

This means that the onus is on you, the reader, to develop a critical awareness of the positions represented in what you read, and to take account of this when you interpret the information. In some cases, authors may be
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13 Post-compulsory science education

In a speech to the Institute of Economic Affairs in 2001, the then UK Secretary of State for Education said:

Young people choosing vocational study will be able to see a ladder of progression that gives structure, purpose and expectation to their lives, in the same way that a future pathway is clear to those who leave school to gain academic A-levels and enter university. Over-16s in full-time education will be abl
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12 Science in secondary schools

The first three readings in this unit use the context of secondary education, particularly in the UK and Australia. In this section, I'll be looking again at the issues highlighted in the previous section on primary science and drawing comparisons with experiences in secondary schools; I'll re-visit much the same issues when I consider post-compulsory science education in Author(s): The Open University

11 Primary science

Primary science has grown in importance in many countries in recent years and all programmes have faced similar problems of improving the science knowledge of primary teachers, lack of equipment, and, just as significantly, lack of agreement about what sort of science should be taught to young pupils. To illustrate some of the similar issues that have confronted policy makers in many areas of the world, let's look at the establishment of primary science in the UK.

Before 1988, England,
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10 ‘Science for all?’ A look at some contexts

The following statement is from the science National Curriculum in England published in 2000.

The importance of science

Science stimulates and excites pupils’ curiosity about phenomena and events in the world around them. It also satisfies this curiosity with knowledge. Because science links direct practical experience with ideas, it can engage learners at many levels. Scientific meth
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9 Evidence of progress?

The new one-year science course for 16–18 year olds Science for Public Understanding, (SPU) has recently been developed and trialled in the UK. It embodies much of the thinking behind Science 2000. Central to the course is the notion that students would use interesting and engaging topics and issues in science, many with a contemporary feel, to develop ‘key science ideas and ideas-about-science’. As with all syllabuses of this (AS) type, SPU is split into modules. The firs
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7.4.2 Assumptions within models

  • recognise that theoretical models carry in-built assumptions that limit the contexts to which the theoretical models can be applied;

  • recognise that the application of theoretical models to a particular context often involves approximations concerning the phenomenon under study.


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Making and using rules
Rules affect us all, and the way they are made and interpreted could effect how we live. This unit explores how we could interpret and apply rules, and provides you with a basic understanding of rules and rule making within the English legal system. First published on Mon, 25 Jul 2011 as Author(s): Creator not set

4 Key players in law enforcement

If a law is broken, who has the responsibility for ensuring that the individual or company who has broken the law is ‘brought to justice’?

Activity 5: Who enforces the law?

0 hours 10 minutes
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3.6 The law of negligence

We will now explore the law of negligence, using a Y166 family example.

Activity 4: The law of negligence

0 hours 20 minutes

Read the box below and answer the question that follows.


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3.3 Members of the UK Parliament

Before we look at what an MP does, have a go at this activity.

Activity 2: The work of a Member of the UK Parliament

0 hours 10 minutes

Take a few moments to think about what you have read s
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7 Review of unit learning outcomes

After studying this unit, you should be able to:

  • explain how Acts of Parliament originate:

     

    • party manifestos, national emergency or crisis, Royal Commissions, the Law Commission, Private Members' Bills

  • discuss the process by which rules become law and the role of Parliament in making legal rules:

     

    • first reading, second read
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The House of Commons

The members of the House of Commons are elected by the public, with the country being divided into constituencies and each of these returning one Member of Parliament (known as an MP). There must be a general election every five years, though an election can be called sooner by the Prime Minister. The Government of the day is generally formed by the political party which has the most MPs elected to the House of Commons. The Prime Minister will usually be the leader of the largest political pa
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2.1 Key themes and learning outcomes

The key themes of Part A are:

  • company;

  • business;

  • capital.

After studying Part A, you should be able to:

  • describe in general terms what a business is;

  • demonstrate an appreciation of the concept of capital.

 

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4 An overview of the legal history of Scotland

To understand the current system of law making in Scotland it is helpful to know from where it originated. The law in Scotland has a complex history, and has been influenced by a wide range of sources. It has a distinct system from that in England and Wales or Northern Ireland, and remains so today. The distinction comes from both historical developments and the current procedures for law making.

Some of the earliest influences on legal Scotland included native customs, Norse law and We
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