1.3 Active reading

Whatever the specific objective of reading, as a student you will always need to read in an active way. Active reading involves reading with a purpose; that is reading in order to grasp definitions and meanings, understand debates, and identify and interpret evidence. It requires you to engage in reading and thinking at one and the same time in order to:

  • identify key ideas

  • extract the information you want from the text
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1.5 Defining dyslexia
Dyslexia is a condition affecting literacy skills. This unit analyses how our image of normality affects the way we as a society define such conditions. You will learn how important it is to integrate the different psychological accounts of dyslexia in order to provide a full explanation of potential causes and strategies for remediation.
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Introduction

We know that the brain has a hugely important role to play in the students' learning that goes on in our classrooms. However, surprisingly, scientists still know relatively little about the workings of the brain, and most of what we do know has been discovered only in the last 15 years. Our challenge is to ensure that what we do know about the brain is translated into classroom practice and used to maximise student learning – this is the idea at the heart of Accelerated Learning. This unit
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1.3.2 Exploring other activities

After trying Activity 3 you may want to explore some of the other resources given or even develop your own, in which case the Global Dimension section of the ASE site or the New Scientist online may be helpful starting points.

One way of bringing global science into the classroom is by using ‘off-the-shelf’ activities that:

  • exemplify curriculum content – for example, iron was extracted from its ore in a precursor of the blast
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1 6. Conclusion

This unit has explored the ways in which moving and still images may motivate and inspire pupils in their understanding of music. You may find it helpful to share your experiences of using images with your peers, perhaps through a short presentation to your department.

1.5.2 Resources

Resources on film music can be difficult to come by. There has been a gradual increase in the range and number of books available, and the bibliography you can get by clicking on the link below should help guide you towards useful texts.

Click 'View document' to open Indicative film music bibliography

Soundtrack albums are now released for many films, and DVDs occasionally include composer i
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit, you will have:

  • an awareness of methods of introducing film music to secondary school pupils;

  • an understanding of how the concept of music accompanying image can be applied to skills of composition;

  • an awareness of how to develop techniques of appraising and analysing film music through classroom activities.

Introduction

There are many approaches to using film music in the classroom, including:

  • a focus on pupil experience;

  • a focus on the structure of composition;

  • a focus on the relationship between music and image;

This unit will explore some of these approaches through various activities.

Acknowledgements

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Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary and is used under licence.

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Learning outcomes

On completion of this unit you should be able to:

  • understand how the use of objects and museum activities can enhance pupil learning;

  • explore the museum resources and support available to teachers, and the ways of accessing those services.

Introduction

Museums give children experiences above and beyond the everyday – experiences that enrich and build upon classroom teaching and learning. Taking pupils to a museum, or bringing museum artefacts into school, instantly changes the dynamics of the usual learning environment. It gives you as a teacher the opportunity to start afresh with each child, to reach and engage with pupils in new and different ways. This unit explores practical ways in which you can make the most of the UK's extraordina
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References

Asimov, I., ‘In my Own View’ in ed. Beare, H. (2001), The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction, Quoted from ‘Education, Technology and Change’ by Megan Blair (accessed on 22 September, 2005).
http://www.cybertext.net.au/tct2002/disc_papers/organisation/blair.htm
DfES (2002), Extended schools: providing opportunities and services for all, p. 6.

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Learning outcomes

Once you have completed this unit you will be able to:

  • clarify your own ideas on literacy criticism;

  • explore with your pupils what makes a good book;

  • produce a range of writing frames to encourage pupils to write book reviews;

  • encourage your pupils to follow some of the award schemes for children's books and perhaps start one of your own.

Introduction

The activities in this unit are designed to support an individual or group of teachers in preparing a school-based training session for colleagues on creativity and information and communications technology (ICT) in the curriculum.

References

DEA/GA (2004) The Global Dimension: Geography, London, Development Education Association.
Goudie, A. (1993) ‘Schools and Universities – the great divide’, Geography 78(4), pp. 338–9.
Gritzner, C. (2004) ‘The Geographic “Mental Map”: Can “anyone” (really) teach geography?’, Journal of Geography 103, pp. 43
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Introduction

This unit explores school geography, focusing upon how geography is currently being taught and understood. While studying this unit you will read about the significance of geography as a subject, considering what are the defining concepts for school geography and its educational value. The unit also includes a lesson plan and a look at definitions of geography as a medium of education.

Learning outcomes

The learning outcomes for this unit are:

  • Understanding and practical experience of creating opportunities for learners to develop dance skills;

  • Awareness and understanding of safe dance practice;

  • Awareness, understanding and practical experience of giving feedback;

  • Promotion of discussion and debate about dance issues throughout the dance curriculum.

Acknowledgements

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Unit development

This unit has been create
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Acknowledgements

This unit was written by Ms Candida Clark

The content acknowledged below is Proprietary (see terms and conditions). This content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

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Introduction

This unit will help you understand the general issues of children's rights as well as exploring childhood and children's needs. It is also possible to link these ideas to the wider issue of the social construction of difference and power. The materials are primarily an audio file, originally 28 minutes in length and recorded in 1998.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Social policy: welfare, power and diversity (D218) which is no longer taught by The
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