William R. Newman on Why Did Isaac Newton Believe in Alchemy
Indiana University professor of History and Philosophy of Science, William R. Newman presents his lecture, entitled Why Did Isaac Newton Believe in Alchemy? Through historical documents and experiments that demonstrate alchemical processes, this lecture explains why one of the most insightful scientists in history was convinced that alchemical transformations were scientifically plausible. It was delivered at the Perimeter Institute in Waterloo, Ontario, on October 6th, 2010.
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The return of the big three
Our correspondents discuss how Ford, Chrysler and GM are raising their sights, upgrading their models and moving into emerging markets
Author(s): The Economist

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253 GG "Desert" Versus "Dessert"
Do you deserve a dessert? Maybe not. The Grammar Girl print book is now available on Amazon.com! http://tinyurl.com/2pkej7
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Friday Gallery Talk: Christina Schepelmann on Guillermo Kuitca

Christina Scheppelmann, director of artistic operations at Washington National Opera, on Guillermo Kuitca: Everything


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Ways To Study English
This is a video giving study ideas and advice for English Language Learners. (3:08)
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Writing English Alphabet Introduction
A good video for ELL teaching the benefits of recognizing the English alphabet.
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Participial Adjectives -ing/-ed Part 1
Participial Adjectives (a.k.a. verbal adjectives, participles as noun modifiers, -ing/-ed adjectives). This teacher made video uses DVDs and her personal reviews to make up sentences with participal adjectives. (9:51)
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Hair
A new Sesame Street video - featuring a Muppet singing about her hair to teach kids about self-esteem and ethnic pride.
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The Preposition Song
A student made song about prepositions to the tune of "It's in His Kiss."
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SchoolHouse Rock-The Greatest Show on Earth-Weather
This Schoolhouse Rock video will explain different types of weather and how they form. Some of the key vocabulary words include the following: low pressure, high pressure, wind, and humidity. This is a good teaching resource for a science lesson/unit on climate, weather, etc. and would work well in conjunction with a story on weather.  (3:00)
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Schoolhouse Rock: I'm a Victim of Gravity
This is a homemade video using the Schoolhouse Rock song "Gravity" with snippets of the actual video. (3:01)
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Greatest Common Factor (GCF)
A student shows how to find the GCF of two numbers
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The value creation imperative
It's been just over 400 years since a Dutch company became the first organisation to sell shares and became publicly traded. By 2007, more than one billion people owned a stake in the world's companies worth more than $75 trillion.


Kevin Kaiser, INSEAD Affiliate Professor of Finance, says that's a dramatic change from the days when monarchs and dictators owned everything and used their country's resources for their good alone. Now, we own the companies as shareholders and Kaiser s

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Classification Overview
This is video is an overview of the classification system. It defines how we classify living things based on evolutionary relationships. It tells the difference of Domain vs. Kingdom. It gives the hierarchy of how we classify.This video is in lecture format.  Run time 04:26.

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Student focus groups prior to M Learning

This video documents the teaching and learning experiences of a group of art students prior to the introduction of mobile learning.
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Student focus groups prior to M Learning

This video documents the teaching and learning experiences of a group of art students prior to the introduction of mobile learning.
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On pricing anomalies and the limits of arbitrage
Textbooks say that even minuscule differences in the price of identical goods in two places should be short-lived. But anomalies do exist, and they often persist for far longer than theories predict, write Denis Gromb and Dimitri Vayanos.
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Cost innovation and the dragons
INSEAD Affiliate Professor of Asian Business and International Management Peter Williamson says Chinese companies are tapping niche markets and customising products, but instead of looking at premium pricing they’re choosing to go mass market with ‘everyday low prices on steroids.’
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Success: A huge business vulnerability?
Former Microsoft Chief Operating Officer Bob Herbold says success creates nine dangerous traps for companies around the world today. “Once they reach some level of success they tend to lose their sense of urgency,” the INSEAD senior executive in residence says. Many companies “think they have found the secret that will lead to everlasting success. Little do they know that by turning their previously successful practices into legacy practices that they follow continually, they’re putting
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The Experience Trap
When companies look for a manager, they should look for experience, right?

Well, maybe not. INSEAD professors Kishore Sengupta and Luk Van Wassenhove say their research has revealed what they call the 'experience trap.' "Conventional wisdom holds that as we do more things more often, we learn from experience and get better and better, and what we found in our research was that actually some of it may not be the case," Sengupta says.

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