Activity 8: Exploring cultural dimensions on Hofstede's website

Allow 60 minutes for this activity.

You have now explored how different people can have different perceptions and how national culture may be one reason why this is the case. You have spent some time too looking at one explanation of national culture and the differences between countries. Hofstede's ideas are quite complex and, for this reason, this activity is an opportunity for you to consolidate your understanding of Geert Hofstede's research.

In this activity you will d
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Activity 7: Hofstede's way of thinking about national culture

Allow 60 minutes for this activity.

Activity 6 introduced you to Hofstede's academic writing. This activity takes this further by giving you the chance to take a closer look at what he actually said.

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Activity 4: What do you see?

Allow 60 minutes for this activity.

Now that you have understood the nature of national culture and how it is manifested in your context, the following activities will help you to appreciate why it matters. Culture influences your way of thinking. Indeed Hofstede argues that it is a ‘given’ for organisations and therefore also influences the way in which organisations are managed.

This activity will help you to understand why culture matters by helping you to see how di
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Activity 2: Differences between national culture and organisational culture

Allow 30 minutes for this activity.

Activity 1 introduced you to national and organisational culture by helping you to develop suitable definitions. This activity will help you to understand more about culture. It looks at differences between national culture and organisational culture. It wil
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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • identify some fundamental dimensions of national and organisational culture;

  • differentiate between various national and organisational cultures;

  • discuss ways in which culture influences organisational environments;

  • critically apply theories on culture to organisations and the environments in which they operate;

  • demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which organisationa
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Acknowledgements

Except for third party materials and otherwise stated (see terms and conditions), this content is made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Licence

Grateful acknowledgement is made to the following sources for permission to reproduce material in this unit:

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Conclusions

You have learned about different work settings and the broader understanding of work used in BU130. We expect that most of the learning and studying students do for BU130 will relate to job settings, but this need not necessarily be the case. Studying this module gives you the opportunity to identify the learning that you want to do and where you want to do it.

References

Touching
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Activity 3: Where is the learning?

Allow 40 minutes for this activity.

What we call ‘learning’ has three very important characteristics. These are:

  • learning is an ongoing process
  • learning is linked to experience
  • learning is the development of skills and new approaches to what we do.

Learning as a process

Learning is an ongoing process and not simpl
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Learning outcomes

Work, of course, does not just mean the work you do when you are employed by an organisation. Many people are self-employed, do voluntary work or work to care for others in unpaid roles. You will read more about this broader definition of work below. There may also be a number of reasons why you would want to use this module to improve your working life. You might, for example, want to:

  • improve your work performance

  • enhance your promotion chances

  • c
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Module team

Dr Terry O'Sullivan, Course Chair

Barry Jones, Course Manager

Sue Treacy, Course Team Assistant

Sam Cooper, OU Business School Regional Coordinator

Joan Hunt, OU Business School Regional Manager

Amanda Shepard, Institute of Fundraising

Production Team

Simon Ashby, Editor

Paul Beeby, Media Project Manager

Martin Brazier, Graphic Design
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References

Institute of Fundraising (2006) The Good Fundraising Guide: Where to start… London [online], Institute of Fundraising, http://www.institute-of-fundraising.org.uk/documents/good_fundraising_guide.pdf (Accessed 20 April 2007).
Lloyd, T. (2006) Cultural Giving, London, Directory of Social Change.
Mellor, P. (1983) ‘Advertising for legacy income’ in Norton, M
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6 Summary

Here is a summary of the main learning points from this unit:

  • The vast majority of people only become donors by being asked.

  • Acknowledging your own feelings about asking is an important step in becoming confident in this key skill.

  • A behavioural approach to asking concentrates on analysing and performing a sequence of activity: choosing the moment, setting the participants at ease, establishing mutuality, explanation,
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5 Legacy fundraising

Legacies are an extremely important source of income for many charities. In the UK they represent well over a quarter of the total income from individuals of the top 500 fundraising charities, with a particularly strong showing in healthcare and animal charities (Sargeant and Jay, 2004). Slightly fewer than half of adults in the UK have written wills, but more than one in ten of those who do, leave charitable bequests (Radcliffe, 2007). Figures like this suggest there is plenty of potential t
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4.3 The ‘maximum potential’ or ‘major support’ approach

It may be that your organisational resources and contacts do not permit a ‘top-down’ strategy of this nature. But that should not prevent you from adopting a big gift orientation. As you saw in relation to the donor matrix, it is better to think of a big gift as ‘the maximum contribution a donor can make’ rather than a fixed sum of money or measure of active support. The Pareto principle predicts that in any appeal or programme you are likely to secure the bulk of your target from a r
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3.6.3 Balancing emotional commitment with awareness and understanding

People's first donation is often prompted by an instinctive and emotional response to a direct appeal. Very rarely is it an informed or carefully calculated decision. Building on that initial response requires you to balance a recognition of your donors’ emotional investment with a need to develop their understanding and awareness of your cause and concerns – the head and heart messages central to your case statement. See Author(s): The Open University

3 The Efficient Markets Hypothesis (EMH)

The classic statements of the Efficient Markets Hypothesis (or EMH for short) are to be found in Roberts (1967) and Fama (1970).

An ‘efficient’ market is defined as a market where there are large numbers of rational, profit ‘maximisers’ actively competing, with each trying to predict future market values of individual securities, and where important current information is almost freely available to all particip
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3.2 The project plan

Although there are many approaches to planning a project, there are seven elements that are normally included in a project plan:

  • a work breakdown structure to show separate tasks and activities;

  • the team structure and responsibilities of key people;

  • an estimate of effort and duration for each task;

  • a schedule to show the sequence and timing of activities;

  • details of resources to be al
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Introduction

This unit will help you to develop the skills required when planning a project. You will examine the various components of a project plan, and be introduced to a number of tools and techniques to aid planning.

This material is from our archive and is an adapted extract from Fundamentals of Senior Management (B713) which is no longer taught by The Open University. If you want to study formally with us, you may wish to explore other courses we offer in this Author(s): The Open University

6.5 RSS

RSS (‘Really Simple Syndication’ or ‘Rich Site Summary’) newsfeeds supply headlines, links, and article summaries from various websites. By using RSS ‘feedreader’ software you can gather together a range of feeds and read them in one place: they come to you, rather than you having to go out and look for breaking news. The range of RSS feeds on offer is growing daily. There is probably a feed to cover all aspects of your life where you might need the latest information, and you may
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6.3 Mailing lists and newsgroups

Mailing or discussion lists are email-based discussion groups. When you send an email to a mailing list address, it is sent automatically to all the other members of the list.

The majority of academic-related mailing lists in the UK are maintained by JISCMail  You will find details of joining these mailing lists on the JI
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