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Machines and Tools, Part II
In this activity, students gain first-hand experience with the mechanical advantage of pulleys. Students are given the challenge of helping save a whale by moving it from an aquarium back to its natural habitat into the ocean. They set up different pulley systems, compare the theoretical and actual mechanical advantage of each and discuss their recommendations as a class.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Sugar Spill!
In this activity, students act as environmental engineers involved with the clean up of a toxic spill. Using bioremediation as the process, students select which bacteria they will use to eat up the pollutant spilled. Students learn how engineers use bioremediation to make organism degrade harmful chemicals. Engineers must make sure bacteria have everything they need to live and degrade contaminants for bioremediation to happen. Students learn about the needs of living things by setting up an ex
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Household energy audit
Students review the electrical appliances used at home and estimate the energy used for each. The results can help to show the energy hogs that could benefit from conservation or improved efficiency.
Author(s): Office of Educational Partnerships,

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Copyright 2011 - Office of Educational Partnerships, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Egg Drop
A process for technical problem solving is introduced and applied to a fun demonstration. Given the success with the demo, the iterative nature of the process can be illustrated.
Author(s): Office of Educational Partnerships,

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Copyright 2011 - Office of Educational Partnerships, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

News Flash!
This activity illustrates the interrelationship between science and engineering in the context of extinction prevention. There are two parts to the activity. The first part challenges students to think like scientists as they generate reports on endangered species and give presentations worthy of a news channel or radio broadcast. The second part puts students in the shoes of engineers, designing ways to help the endangered species.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Our Amazing, Powerful Sun
The purpose of this lesson is to introduce the students to the Sun. They explore various aspects of the Sun including its composition, its interior workings, and its relationship to the Earth.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Both Fields at Once?!
This lesson discusses the result of a charge being subject to both electric and magnetic fields at the same time. It covers the Hall effect, velocity selector, and the charge to mass ratio. Given several sample problems, students learn to calculate the Hall Voltage dependent upon the width of the plate, the drift velocity, and the strength of the magnetic field. Then students learn to calculate the velocity selector, represented by the ratio of the magnitude of the fields assuming the strength o
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineeri

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

May the Magnetic Force be with You
This lesson begins with a demonstration of the deflection of an electron beam. Students then review their knowledge of the cross product and the right hand rule with sample problems. After which, students study the magnetic force on a charged particle as compared to the electric force. The following lecture material covers the motion of a charged particle in a magnetic field with respect to the direction of the field. Finally, students apply these concepts to understand the magnetic force on a c
Author(s): VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineeri

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Copyright 2011 - VU Bioengineering RET Program, School of Engineering, Vanderbilt University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Muscles, Oh My!
Students are introduced to how engineering closely relates to the field of biomechanics and how the muscular system produces human movement. They learn the importance of the muscular system in our daily lives, why it is important to be able to repair muscular injuries and how engineering helps us by creating things to benefit our muscular health, movement and repair.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Breathe In, Breathe Out
Students are introduced to the respiratory system, the lungs and air. They learn about how the lungs and diaphragm work, how air pollution affects lungs and respiratory functions, some widespread respiratory problems, and how engineers help us stay healthy by designing machines and medicines that support respiratory health and function.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Designing a Spectroscopy Mission
Students find and calculate the angle that light is transmitted through a holographic diffraction grating using trigonometry. After finding this angle, student teams design and build their own spectrographs, researching and designing a ground- or space-based mission using their creation. At project end, teams present their findings to the class, as if they were making an engineering conference presentation. Student must have completed the associated Building a Fancy Spectrograph activity before
Author(s): Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP

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Copyright 2011 - Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Don’t Confuse Your Qs!
Students investigate the difference between qualitative and quantitative measurements and observations. By describing objects both qualitatively and quantitatively, students learn that both types of information are required for complete descriptions. Students discuss various the characteristics of many objects, demonstrating how engineers use both qualitative and quantitative information in product design.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Rock Cycle
Through five lessons, students are introduced to all facets of the rock cycle. Topics include rock and mineral types, material stresses and weathering, geologic time and fossil formation, the Earth’s crust and tectonic plates, and soil formation and composition. Lessons are in the context of the related impact on humans in the form of roadway and tunnel design and construction, natural disasters, environmental site assessment for building structures, and measurement instrumentation and tools.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Integrated Teaching and Learning Program, College of Engineering, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Sudsy Cells
Students culture cells in order to find out which type of surfactant (in this case, soap) is best at removing bacteria. Groups culture cells from unwashed hands and add regular bar soap, regular liquid soap, anti-bacterial soap, dishwasher soap, and hand sanitizer to the cultures. The cultures are allowed to grow for two days and then the students assess which type of soap did the best job of removing bacteria cells from unwashed hands. Students extend their knowledge of engineering and surfacta
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Product Development and the Environment
In this activity, students investigate the life cycle of an engineered product and how the product impacts the environment. They analyze a product using a simple life cycle assessment that assigns fictional numerical values for different steps in the life cycle. They use their analysis to compare the impacts of their product to other products, as well as suggest ways to reduce the product’s environmental impact based on their analysis.
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Move It!
Mechanical energy is the most easily understood form of energy for students. When there is mechanical energy involved, something moves. Mechanical energy is a very important concept to understand. Engineers need to know what happens when something heavy falls from a long distance changing its potential energy into kinetic energy. Automotive engineers need to know what happens when cars crash into each other, and why they can do so much damage, even at low speeds! Our knowledge of mechanical ener
Author(s): Duke University, Pratt School of Engineering K-PhD

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Copyright 2011 - Duke University, Pratt School of Engineering K-PhD, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Riding the Radio Waves
Through this lesson students learn how AM radios work through basic concepts about waves and magnetic fields. Waves are first introduced by establishing the difference between transverse and longitudinal waves, as well as identifying the amplitude and frequency of a given waveform. Students then learn general concepts about magnetic fields, leading into how radio waves are created and transmitted. Several demonstrations can be performed in order to help students better understand these concepts.
Author(s): Techtronics Program,

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Copyright 2011 - Techtronics Program, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

Floating and Falling Flows
Students discover fluid dynamics related to buoyancy through experimentation and optional photography. Using one set of fluids, they make light fluids rise through denser fluids. Using another set, they make dense fluids sink through a lighter fluid. In both cases, they see and record beautiful fluid motion. Activities are also suitable as class demonstrations. The natural beauty of fluid flow opens the door to seeing the beauty of physics in general.
Author(s): Flow Visualization Laboratory, Department of Mecha

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Copyright 2011 - Flow Visualization Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Colorado at Boulder,http://www.teachengineering.org/poli

Survive That Tsunami!
Students use a table-top-sized tsunami generator to observe the formation and devastation of a tsunami. They see how a tsunami moves across the ocean and what happens when it reaches the continental shelf. Students make villages of model houses and buildings to test how different material types are impacted by the huge waves. They further discuss how engineers design buildings to survive tsunamis. Much of this activity setup is the same as for the Mini-Landscape activity in Lesson 4 of the Natur
Author(s): Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

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Binary and Communication Systems
Through this activity, students are introduced to the concept of binary coding as a language and its practical applications in digital and communication systems.This project is intended to give students a deeper appreciation for communication systems and an understanding of how binary symbols are used to transmit information.
Author(s): Center for Engineering Educational Outreach,

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Copyright 2011 - Center for Engineering Educational Outreach, Tufts University,http://www.teachengineering.org/policy_ipp.php

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