4.1 Introduction

In the theory of plate tectonics there are three main types of plate boundary, namely: constructive, destructive and conservative plate boundaries.

Figure 5
Figure
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3 A global view of Earth history

Figure 3, below, shows how the Earth's continents have drifted across the globe over the past 550 million years. This is a reconstruction of continental configurations of the Earth's landmasses during the Phanerozoic Eon. Note how northern and southern parts of the British Isles (red) were dispersed over two continents/tectonic plates until the end of the Devonian (a–d), and that all the landmasses formed one supercontinent during the Permo-Triassic (f).


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Learning outcomes

By the end of this unit you should be able to:

  • summarise and identify descriptions of the principal features of the main lithotectonic units of the British Isles, namely the Precambrian Basement, the Caledonian Orogenic Belt, the Variscan Orogenic Belt, the Older Cover and the Younger Cover;

  • identify any of the main terranes making up the British Isles on the basis of a description of its age, main rock types, dominant structures, and plate tectonic setting.


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3.14 Questions on the Moon

Now try to answer the following questions, to remind you of some of the things you have learned and test your understanding of them.

Question 1

3.9 Moon41: Apollo 15 station 2

The panorama was collected by James B. Irwin at Station 2. David Scott is to the left of the rover. He is examining a boulder. The large hill to the left of the rover is the summit of Mt. Hadley Delta. (QuickTime, 400KB, note: this may take some time to download depending on your connection speed)

3.8 Moon40: Apollo 14 station H

The panorama was collected by Edgar Dean at station H. Alan Shepard is to the left of the lander aiming the TV camera at the MESA. (QuickTime, 500KB, note: this may take some time to download depending on your connection speed)

3.7 Moon39: Apollo 14 station C

The panorama was collected by Alan Shepard at station C-Prime. (QuickTime, 500KB, note: this may take some time to download depending on your connection speed)

3.5 Moon37: Apollo 12 station 3

The panorama was collected by Charles "Pete" Conrad. (QuickTime, 500KB, note: this may take some time to download depending on your connection speed)

3.4 Moon36: Apollo 12 station 2

Pete Conrad took this pan early in EVA-1 from a position due west of the Lunar Module. Al Bean can be seen in several frames taking documentation photos of the Solar Wind Collector (SWC) that he has just deployed. (QuickTime, 500KB, note: this may take some time to download depending on your connection speed)

2.6 The surface

David A. Rothery Teach Yourself Planets, Chapter 6, pp. 66–75, Hodder Education, 2000, 2003.

Copyright © David Rothery

Look at the Moon even with the unaided eye, and you will see that it has dark patches on a paler background (Figure 2). This simple observation picks out the two distinct types of crust on the Moon. The paler areas are the lunar highlands, and the darker areas are the lunar ‘seas’ or maria (singular: mare). Both the highla
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6.4.1 Writing a chemical equation to describe a chemical process

Natural gas, which is largely methane, is burned to provide heat for cooking and domestic heating and as an industrial power source. This process of burning involves the reaction of methane with oxygen in air to produce carbon dioxide and water.

A chemical equation can be constructed for the reaction of methane with oxygen to give carbon dioxide and water as the products.

  1. The first step is to write the formulas of the reactants on the left and t
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6.1 Introduction

The previous sections in this unit include many terms which may have been unfamiliar to you: for example, atom, element, compound, molecule and bond. Chemistry has a language all of its own and grasping the terminology can be as much of a problem as understanding the chemistry itself. In Section 6, you will consider the language of chemistry before returning to the examination of bonding.


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3 What are compounds?

Activity 1: Elements and compounds

0 hours 10 minutes

Click on the video clip to watch Elements and Compounds, which focuses on water and its constituent elements.

Click below to v
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Enacting European Citizenship (ENACT)
The term European citizenship triggers an immediate association with the European Union, its member states, and people who are citizens of those states. This unit develops another way of thinking about European citizenship whereby European citizenship need not be granted by the state, limited to the territory within the EU borders or acted out by people who are already citizens.Author(s): Creator not set

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Environmentalist and former leader of the Australian Greens Dr Bob Brown is interviewed by Associate Professor Frank Jotzo of the Crawford School of Public Policy at ANU. This interview was recorded on 3 December 2012, ahead of Dr Brown's Crawford School Reflections Lecture that evening.
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Invasive weed a serious concern in the Pacific Northwest
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Introduction

Models are mechanisms for communication. This course looks at what a model is and what the process of modelling is about. The techniques discussed here are applicable to a wide range of systems and have one thing in common: they are all commonly used diagramming techniques. The five techniques are: data flow diagrams, use case modelling, activity diagrams, entity–relationship diagrams and state machines.

This OpenLearn course provides a sample of postgraduate study in Author(s): The Open University

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Copyright © 2016 The Open University

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How to enlarge a PDF document during printing, or printing a single page across multiple sheets of paper in Acrobat or Adobe Reader X (not 10.1.2 or later).
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GS-19: Editing text
Edit text by changing its font, color, size or content. Learn how to select a text layer for editing and use the type tools to make your changes. Use with either Photoshop Elements version 7 or 8.
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Domaine: Sciences de la vie et ingénierie du vivant
CLE D’IDENTIFICATION DES ARBRES ET ARBUSTES DE LA REGION PARISIENNE et du Nord de la France

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